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Transcript

  • 1. Día de los Muertos y Halloween.Por: Ciera Johnson Periodo: 7
  • 2. What is Day of the Dead?It is celebrated in Mexico, Central America,and the United States, on Nov. 1 and 2. Dayof the Dead is mainly known as a holiday ofLatino culture, but it evolved from Aztecroots, surviving the Spanish conquest ofMexico, to encompass Catholic traits, whichbroaden its plane of worship, festivity, andhonor.
  • 3. What is Day of the Dead?It is celebrated in Mexico, Central America,and the United States, on Nov. 1 and 2. Dayof the Dead is mainly known as a holiday ofLatino culture, but it evolved from Aztecroots, surviving the Spanish conquest ofMexico, to encompass Catholic traits, whichbroaden its plane of worship, festivity, andhonor.
  • 4. What is Day of the Dead?It is celebrated in Mexico, Central America,and the United States, on Nov. 1 and 2. Dayof the Dead is mainly known as a holiday ofLatino culture, but it evolved from Aztecroots, surviving the Spanish conquest ofMexico, to encompass Catholic traits, whichbroaden its plane of worship, festivity, andhonor.
  • 5. ✦Brightly decorated altars, laden with skullsmade out of sugar, bread, flowers andcandles, create a circle of respect for theirancestors and the recently departed.✦ Young and old faces, peering out fromantique scrapbooks, are displayed in greeting.✦The dead are treated like guests of honorat a feast, their favorite dishes set upon thealtar.
  • 6. ✦Brightly decorated altars, laden with skullsmade out of sugar, bread, flowers andcandles, create a circle of respect for theirancestors and the recently departed.✦ Young and old faces, peering out fromantique scrapbooks, are displayed in greeting.✦The dead are treated like guests of honorat a feast, their favorite dishes set upon thealtar.
  • 7. ✦Brightly decorated altars, laden with skullsmade out of sugar, bread, flowers andcandles, create a circle of respect for theirancestors and the recently departed.✦ Young and old faces, peering out fromantique scrapbooks, are displayed in greeting.✦The dead are treated like guests of honorat a feast, their favorite dishes set upon thealtar.
  • 8. History
  • 9. History-When the Spanish Conquistadors landed in what is nowMexico, they encountered natives practicing a ritualthat seemed to mock death.-A ritual known today as Día de los Muertos, or Day ofthe Dead had been practicing at least 3,000 years bythe indigenous people. The ritual has since beenmerged with Catholic theology. It still maintains thebasic principles of the Aztec ritual, such as the use ofskulls.
  • 10. History-When the Spanish Conquistadors landed in what is nowMexico, they encountered natives practicing a ritualthat seemed to mock death.-A ritual known today as Día de los Muertos, or Day ofthe Dead had been practicing at least 3,000 years bythe indigenous people. The ritual has since beenmerged with Catholic theology. It still maintains thebasic principles of the Aztec ritual, such as the use ofskulls.
  • 11. History-When the Spanish Conquistadors landed in what is nowMexico, they encountered natives practicing a ritualthat seemed to mock death.-A ritual known today as Día de los Muertos, or Day ofthe Dead had been practicing at least 3,000 years bythe indigenous people. The ritual has since beenmerged with Catholic theology. It still maintains thebasic principles of the Aztec ritual, such as the use ofskulls.
  • 12. History-When the Spanish Conquistadors landed in what is nowMexico, they encountered natives practicing a ritualthat seemed to mock death.-A ritual known today as Día de los Muertos, or Day ofthe Dead had been practicing at least 3,000 years bythe indigenous people. The ritual has since beenmerged with Catholic theology. It still maintains thebasic principles of the Aztec ritual, such as the use ofskulls.
  • 13. History
  • 14. HistoryThe Spaniards considered the ritual to besacrilegious. They perceived the indigenouspeople to be barbaric. In their attempts toconvert them to Catholicism, the Spaniardstried to kill the ritual. But the ritualrefused to die. To make the ritual moreChristian, the Spaniards moved it so itcoincided with All Saints Day and All SoulsDay (Nov. 1 and 2). Previously it fell on theninth month of the Aztec Solar Calendar,approximately the beginning of August, andwas celebrated for the entire month.
  • 15. HistoryThe Spaniards considered the ritual to besacrilegious. They perceived the indigenouspeople to be barbaric. In their attempts toconvert them to Catholicism, the Spaniardstried to kill the ritual. But the ritualrefused to die. To make the ritual moreChristian, the Spaniards moved it so itcoincided with All Saints Day and All SoulsDay (Nov. 1 and 2). Previously it fell on theninth month of the Aztec Solar Calendar,approximately the beginning of August, andwas celebrated for the entire month.
  • 16. HistoryThe Spaniards considered the ritual to besacrilegious. They perceived the indigenouspeople to be barbaric. In their attempts toconvert them to Catholicism, the Spaniardstried to kill the ritual. But the ritualrefused to die. To make the ritual moreChristian, the Spaniards moved it so itcoincided with All Saints Day and All SoulsDay (Nov. 1 and 2). Previously it fell on theninth month of the Aztec Solar Calendar,approximately the beginning of August, andwas celebrated for the entire month.
  • 17. Halloween
  • 18. Halloween- Adults and children go out to haunted houses or scary places.Children like to go trick-or-treating to different houses asking for candy.- Some people carve out pumpkins that will have different shapes in thepumpkin.- They will dress up in different costumes like mythical creatures, differentaction figurers, characters from different movies/shows, and people they lookup to.
  • 19. Halloween- Adults and children go out to haunted houses or scary places.Children like to go trick-or-treating to different houses asking for candy.- Some people carve out pumpkins that will have different shapes in thepumpkin.- They will dress up in different costumes like mythical creatures, differentaction figurers, characters from different movies/shows, and people they lookup to.
  • 20. Halloween- Adults and children go out to haunted houses or scary places.Children like to go trick-or-treating to different houses asking for candy.- Some people carve out pumpkins that will have different shapes in thepumpkin.- They will dress up in different costumes like mythical creatures, differentaction figurers, characters from different movies/shows, and people they lookup to.
  • 21. Halloween- Adults and children go out to haunted houses or scary places.Children like to go trick-or-treating to different houses asking for candy.- Some people carve out pumpkins that will have different shapes in thepumpkin.- They will dress up in different costumes like mythical creatures, differentaction figurers, characters from different movies/shows, and people they lookup to.
  • 22. Halloween- Adults and children go out to haunted houses or scary places.Children like to go trick-or-treating to different houses asking for candy.- Some people carve out pumpkins that will have different shapes in thepumpkin.- They will dress up in different costumes like mythical creatures, differentaction figurers, characters from different movies/shows, and people they lookup to.
  • 23. HalloweenHalloween is also known as All Hallows Eve. It is ayearly holiday observed around the world onOctober 31, the night before All Saints Day. Muchlike Day of the Dead celebrations, the Christian feastof All Hallows Eve, according to some scholars,incorporates traditions from pagan harvest festivalsand festivals honoring the dead.
  • 24. Día de los muertos
  • 25. Día de los muertos- For day of the dead they have sugar skulls like we get candy. There arejust decorated sugar skulls and chocolate skulls.- They have a parade that fills the streets- People decorate graves in honor of dead loved ones wiht flowers andcandles.
  • 26. Día de los muertos- For day of the dead they have sugar skulls like we get candy. There arejust decorated sugar skulls and chocolate skulls.- They have a parade that fills the streets- People decorate graves in honor of dead loved ones wiht flowers andcandles.
  • 27. Día de los muertos- For day of the dead they have sugar skulls like we get candy. There arejust decorated sugar skulls and chocolate skulls.- They have a parade that fills the streets- People decorate graves in honor of dead loved ones wiht flowers andcandles.
  • 28. Día de los muertos- For day of the dead they have sugar skulls like we get candy. There arejust decorated sugar skulls and chocolate skulls.- They have a parade that fills the streets- People decorate graves in honor of dead loved ones wiht flowers andcandles.
  • 29. Symbolism
  • 30. • Orange: sun Symbolism• Red: the blood of life• Purple: pain, suffering, grief, and mourning.• Pink: celebration• White: purity and hope• Yellow: cempazuchitl are marigolds that symbolize death. Petals are used to make a trail so that the spirits can see the path to their altars.• Skulls symbolize death and rebirth.• Pan de muerto represents the souls of the dead.• Incense represents the changing of the physical to the spiritual.• Salt and water represent ongoing life.
  • 31. • Orange: sun Symbolism• Red: the blood of life• Purple: pain, suffering, grief, and mourning.• Pink: celebration• White: purity and hope• Yellow: cempazuchitl are marigolds that symbolize death. Petals are used to make a trail so that the spirits can see the path to their altars.• Skulls symbolize death and rebirth.• Pan de muerto represents the souls of the dead.• Incense represents the changing of the physical to the spiritual.• Salt and water represent ongoing life.
  • 32. • Orange: sun Symbolism• Red: the blood of life• Purple: pain, suffering, grief, and mourning.• Pink: celebration• White: purity and hope• Yellow: cempazuchitl are marigolds that symbolize death. Petals are used to make a trail so that the spirits can see the path to their altars.• Skulls symbolize death and rebirth.• Pan de muerto represents the souls of the dead.• Incense represents the changing of the physical to the spiritual.• Salt and water represent ongoing life.
  • 33. • Orange: sun Symbolism• Red: the blood of life• Purple: pain, suffering, grief, and mourning.• Pink: celebration• White: purity and hope• Yellow: cempazuchitl are marigolds that symbolize death. Petals are used to make a trail so that the spirits can see the path to their altars.• Skulls symbolize death and rebirth.• Pan de muerto represents the souls of the dead.• Incense represents the changing of the physical to the spiritual.• Salt and water represent ongoing life.
  • 34. Día de los muertos
  • 35. Día de los muertosMexican Day of the Dead are hugeparades that fill the street andshut the city down for one or twofull days. A parade is a publicmarch or procession honoring aparticular occasion. A typical Day ofthe Dead (Día de los Muertos) dayends at the cemetery. Offerings arebrought to the graves and includethe favorite foods, beverages andbelongings of the dead.
  • 36. Día de los muertosMexican Day of the Dead are hugeparades that fill the street andshut the city down for one or twofull days. A parade is a publicmarch or procession honoring aparticular occasion. A typical Day ofthe Dead (Día de los Muertos) dayends at the cemetery. Offerings arebrought to the graves and includethe favorite foods, beverages andbelongings of the dead.
  • 37. Día de los muertosMexican Day of the Dead are hugeparades that fill the street andshut the city down for one or twofull days. A parade is a publicmarch or procession honoring aparticular occasion. A typical Day ofthe Dead (Día de los Muertos) dayends at the cemetery. Offerings arebrought to the graves and includethe favorite foods, beverages andbelongings of the dead.
  • 38. Día de los muertosMexican Day of the Dead are hugeparades that fill the street andshut the city down for one or twofull days. A parade is a publicmarch or procession honoring aparticular occasion. A typical Day ofthe Dead (Día de los Muertos) dayends at the cemetery. Offerings arebrought to the graves and includethe favorite foods, beverages andbelongings of the dead.
  • 39. How to Celebrate
  • 40. How to Celebrate Today, people wear wooden skull masks called calacas and dance in honor of their deceased relatives. Sugar skulls, made with the names of the dead person on the forehead. In rural Mexico, people visit the cemetery where their loved ones are buried. They decorate grave sites with marigold flowers and candles. They bring toys for dead children and bottles of tequila to adults. In the United States and in Mexicos larger cities, families build altars in their homes, dedicating them to the dead.
  • 41. How to Celebrate Today, people wear wooden skull masks called calacas and dance in honor of their deceased relatives. Sugar skulls, made with the names of the dead person on the forehead. In rural Mexico, people visit the cemetery where their loved ones are buried. They decorate grave sites with marigold flowers and candles. They bring toys for dead children and bottles of tequila to adults. In the United States and in Mexicos larger cities, families build altars in their homes, dedicating them to the dead.
  • 42. How to Celebrate Today, people wear wooden skull masks called calacas and dance in honor of their deceased relatives. Sugar skulls, made with the names of the dead person on the forehead. In rural Mexico, people visit the cemetery where their loved ones are buried. They decorate grave sites with marigold flowers and candles. They bring toys for dead children and bottles of tequila to adults. In the United States and in Mexicos larger cities, families build altars in their homes, dedicating them to the dead.
  • 43. How to Celebrate Today, people wear wooden skull masks called calacas and dance in honor of their deceased relatives. Sugar skulls, made with the names of the dead person on the forehead. In rural Mexico, people visit the cemetery where their loved ones are buried. They decorate grave sites with marigold flowers and candles. They bring toys for dead children and bottles of tequila to adults. In the United States and in Mexicos larger cities, families build altars in their homes, dedicating them to the dead.