The Boulter                                  House                               Hypothetical NC Platinum Project         ...
SS p1 Construction Activity                             Pollution Prevention                                Prevent soil ...
SS c1 Site Selection                               Reduces impact from location of   buildingCopyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
SS c2 Development Density &   Community Connectivity        Opt 1 - Is a previously         developed site but not       ...
SS c3 Brownfield   Redevelopment        Site isn’t documented as         contaminated by federal,         state, local or...
SS c4.1 Alternative Transportation –   Public Transportation Access        No bus stops within ¼         mile      Pictu...
SS c4.2 Alternative Transportation –   Bicycle Storage and Changing Rooms        2 FTE (Full Time         Equivalent) Occ...
SS c4.3 Alternative Transportation –   Low-Emission & Fuel-Efficient Vehicles        2 FTE (Full Time         Equivalent)...
SS c4.4 Alternative Transportation –   Parking Capacity        2 FTE (Full Time         Equivalent) Occupants        Opt...
SS c5.1 Site Development –   Protect or Restore Habitat        Opt 1 Greenfield site –         limit disturbance:        ...
SS c5.2 Site Development –   Maximize Open Space        Opt 1 Exceed local         zoning requirement by         25% with...
SS c6.1 Stormwater Design–   Quantity Control        Opt 1 – Existing         imperviousness is less         than or equa...
SS c6.2 Stormwater Design–   Quality Control        Cincinnati receives 40” of         rain per year.      To meet this ...
SS c7.1 Heat Island Effect –   Non-Roof          Opt 1 – At least 50% of           site has shade (paver drive           ...
SS c7.1 Heat Island Effect –   Roof        Opt 1 – Roofing materials         need SRI of 78 for 75% of         roof. Curr...
SS c8 Light Pollution Reduction        For Interior Lighting –         Some interior lighting’s         angle of maximum ...
WE 1.1 – Water Efficient Landscaping   Reduce by 50%        Reduce potable water use         by plant species, drip      ...
WE 1.2 – Water Efficient Landscaping   No Potable Water Use or No Irrigation        Eliminate potable water         use b...
WE 2 – Innovative Wastewater   Technologies        Opt 1 – Reduce building         sewage conveyance by         50%. Even...
WE 3.1 – Water Use Reduction   20% ReductionCopyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
WE 3.2 – Water Use Reduction   30% ReductionCopyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
EA p1 – Fundamental   Commissioning      1. Commisioning Agent: Barb       5. Verify Installation and       Yankee      ...
EA p1 – Fundamental   Commissioning      Owner’s Project Requirements        Basis of Design         Requirement: Resid...
EA p2 – Minimum Energy   Performance      ASHRAE/IESNA       90.1-2004 Doesn’t       apply to low rise       residential ...
EA p2 – Minimum Energy   Performance        Walls are 35% glazing         requiring Solar heat         Gain Coefficients ...
EA p3 – Fundamental   Refrigerant Management      Replace or retrofit       the CFC-based       refrigerants in       exi...
EA c1 – Optimize Energy   PerformanceCopyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
EA c1 – Optimize Energy   Performance      Dual-Pane Metal Frame       tinted low-E glass doors       and windows are    ...
EA c1 – Optimize Energy   Performance      Carport glass needs       to be replaced with       Dual-Pane Metal       Fram...
EA c1 – Optimize Energy   Performance                               Installing NanaWall on both                          ...
EA c2 & ID – On-Site   Renewable Energy      Install geo-thermal and       Solar PV for 17.5%       Cost reductionCopyrig...
EA c3 – Enhanced   Commissioning      Conduct commissioning      Develop systems manual       design review prior to    ...
EA c4 – Enhanced   Refrigerant Management      Specify “Natural refrigerants” including water, carbon dioxide or       am...
EA c5 –     Measurement & Verification        International Performance Measurement and Verification Protocol         IPM...
EA c6 – Green Power      Estimated 2008 energy usage is       $3900      EA p2 provides for Minimum Energy       Perform...
MR p1– Storage &   Collection of Recyclables      Recycle paper, cardboard,       plastics 1 & 2, metal and       glass  ...
MR c1.1 & 1.2 – Building Reuse   Maintain 95% of Existing Walls,   Floors & RoofCopyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
MR c1.3 – Building Reuse Maintain   50% of Interior Non-Structural   ElementsCopyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
MR c2.1 & 2.2 –    Construction    Waste    Management -    Divert 75% from    Disposal      Wood from carport       wind...
MR c3.1& 3.2       Materials Reuse       10%         Glass removed will be           sandwiched           (refurbished) w...
MR c4.1, 4.2 & ID       Recycled Content       40%         New glass has           26% recycled           content $520   ...
MR c5.1 & 5.2       Regional       Materials       20%         Window glass $2000         Paint $250         Window Bot...
MR c6.1 & 6.2       Rapidly       Renewable       Materials 5%         Window Bottom           Rail Rapidly           Ren...
MR c7 – Certified Wood   NanaWall FSC AvailableCopyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
MR Summary c3 thru c7 ValuesCopyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
EQ p1 –   Minimum IAQ Performance      Using ASHRAE       62.2-2004 for low rise       residential      Kitchen and one ...
EQ p2 –   Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ETS)   Control      Opt 1 No smoking      Opt 2 Designated smoking       areas   ...
EQ c1 – Outdoor Air Delivery   Monitoring      For mechanically       ventilated spaces       provide a direct       outd...
EQ c2 – Increased Ventilation      For mechanically       ventilated spaces       increase breathing       zone ventilati...
EQ c3.1 & 3.2 – Construction IAQ   Management Plan      Not       attempting       these credits       because       ther...
EQ c4.1 – Low Emitting Materials   Adhesives and Sealants      All adhesives       and sealants       used to install    ...
EQ c4.2 – Low Emitting Materials   Paints & Coatings      The interior of       the home will       be finally       pain...
EQ c4.3 – Low Emitting Materials   Carpet Systems      This Credit isn’t attempted     Any area carpets installed will  ...
EQ c4.3 – Low Emitting Materials    Composite Wood & Agrifiber    Products      This Credit isn’t attempted      Any pro...
EQ c5 – Indoor Chemical & Pollutant    Source Control      This Credit isn’t attempted      Maintain entry mats      Ha...
EQ c6.1 – Controllability of Systems   Lighting      Provide individual lighting       controls for 90% of the       buil...
EQ c6.2 – Controllability of Systems   Thermal Comfort      Provide individual comfort     And provide comfort system   ...
EQ c7.1 –Thermal Comfort   Design      Evaluate air       temperature,       radiant       temperature, air       speed a...
EQ c7.2 –   Thermal   Comfort   Verification      Survey the spouse       (and Peavey and       Penny) within a       per...
EQ c8.1 & 8.2 –   Daylight & Views   Daylight 75% of   Spaces      The bath tub room       on the second       floor does...
EQ c8.1 & 8.2 –   Daylight & Views   Views for 90% of   Spaces      The narrow       windows needed a       building code...
ID c1.1 to 1.4   Innovation in Design     1.1 Site Development   5.1 –     1.3 On-site Renewable Energy       Restore Ha...
ID c1.5 - LEED APCopyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
ID c1.5 - LEED APCopyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
ID c1.5 - LEED APCopyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
ID c1.5 - LEED APCopyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
ID c1.5 - LEED APCopyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
ID c1.5 - LEED APCopyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
ID c1.5 - LEED APCopyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Boulter House LEED Project, Frank Lloyd Wright design

595 views
470 views

Published on

Hypothetical LEED NC Platinum Project using a Frank Lloyd Wright designed home. The home has registered for LEED for Homes and is in the process of organizing the Integrated Design team in 2012. Web site http://green-cincinnati.com/category/flw-boulter-house/

Published in: Business, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
595
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
13
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Boulter House LEED Project, Frank Lloyd Wright design

  1. 1. The Boulter House Hypothetical NC Platinum Project (LEED NC may not applicable because the home can’t meet the EA p1 Minimum Energy Performance with the single row of block on the north side.Copyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
  2. 2. SS p1 Construction Activity Pollution Prevention   Prevent soil from geo-thermal well digging on south side flowing into storm sewers • • • •Copyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
  3. 3. SS c1 Site Selection   Reduces impact from location of buildingCopyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
  4. 4. SS c2 Development Density & Community Connectivity   Opt 1 - Is a previously developed site but not 60,000 sf per acre   Opt 2 - Is a previously developed site but not 10 units per acre or enough Basic Services within ½ mile   Square is 1 mile per sideCopyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
  5. 5. SS c3 Brownfield Redevelopment   Site isn’t documented as contaminated by federal, state, local or voluntary programCopyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
  6. 6. SS c4.1 Alternative Transportation – Public Transportation Access   No bus stops within ¼ mile   Picture is ½ mile per side   The Middleton Ave. is so wide because it used to have a streetcar line down the middle of it.Copyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
  7. 7. SS c4.2 Alternative Transportation – Bicycle Storage and Changing Rooms   2 FTE (Full Time Equivalent) Occupants   Not a commercial or institutional building requiring racks for 5% of peak users and showers for 0.5% FTE   For residential – One covered bike storage meets requirements for 15% of occupantsCopyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
  8. 8. SS c4.3 Alternative Transportation – Low-Emission & Fuel-Efficient Vehicles   2 FTE (Full Time Equivalent) Occupants   Opt 1 provide vehicle of at least a Green Score of 40 (3% of occupants)   Opt 2 provide preferred parking for one Green Score of 40 vehicle (5% of total parking of 2)   Opt 3 Install electric outlet for electric vehicle (3% of total parking capacityCopyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
  9. 9. SS c4.4 Alternative Transportation – Parking Capacity   2 FTE (Full Time Equivalent) Occupants   Opt 1 Non-Res – Not over code and preferred parking for one place (5% total)   Opt 2 Non-Res - parking for one place (5% total)   Opt 3 Residential – Not over code and facilitate shared vehicle usage   Opt 4 – No new parkingCopyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
  10. 10. SS c5.1 Site Development – Protect or Restore Habitat   Opt 1 Greenfield site – limit disturbance: 40’ bldg, 25’ permeable drive, 15’ roadway, 10’ patios   Opt 2 Previously developed site – 50% to be planted with native or adaptive vegetation   Exemplary Performance 75% of site area excluding building footprintCopyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
  11. 11. SS c5.2 Site Development – Maximize Open Space   Opt 1 Exceed local zoning requirement by 25% with vegetated open space   Opt 2 If no zoning requirements - Provide vegetated open space equal to footprint   Opt 3 – No zoning requirement for open space – provide 20% vegetated open space   Exemplary Performance for open space 2x the building footprintCopyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
  12. 12. SS c6.1 Stormwater Design– Quantity Control   Opt 1 – Existing imperviousness is less than or equal 50% (one- year, 24-hour design storm – about 2.75” for Maryland). 1” of rain would require 890 gal. storage for the 1500 sf roof. Install 8 rain barrels.   Opt 2 – Reduce existing, imperviousness greater than 50%, volume stormwater runoff by 25% (two-year, 24-hour design storm – about 3.5” for Maryland)Copyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
  13. 13. SS c6.2 Stormwater Design– Quality Control   Cincinnati receives 40” of rain per year.   To meet this credit we’ll Rain garden demonstrate that the site can absorb 1” of rainfall. The site can but the roof’s 900 gallons need to be treated.   East rain barrels would need to increase to 400 gallons   West side would need to add a rain gardenCopyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
  14. 14. SS c7.1 Heat Island Effect – Non-Roof   Opt 1 – At least 50% of site has shade (paver drive doesn’t count because it isn’t at least 50%pervious)   Opt 2 – Less than 50% of parking spaces are under cover (None are)Copyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
  15. 15. SS c7.1 Heat Island Effect – Roof   Opt 1 – Roofing materials need SRI of 78 for 75% of roof. Current flat roof’s SRI is 70. Would need to paint it with a 78 SRI material.   Opt 2 – Vegetated roof for 50% of roof area   Opt 3 – 1500 sf = 60 4sf green roof trays for ballast and paint 765 sf with SRI material 78.Copyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
  16. 16. SS c8 Light Pollution Reduction   For Interior Lighting – Some interior lighting’s angle of maximum candela exits out through the windows. Install motion sensors to automatically turn off lights.   For Exterior Lighting – project is 80% below 1.0 w/sf for walkways. Building façade exterior lights are 1500w, above 100w (500 sf * 0.2 w/sf)Copyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
  17. 17. WE 1.1 – Water Efficient Landscaping Reduce by 50%   Reduce potable water use by plant species, drip irrigation and captured rainwater   Site doesn’t recycle wastewater or have access to water supplied by a public agency for non- potable usesCopyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
  18. 18. WE 1.2 – Water Efficient Landscaping No Potable Water Use or No Irrigation   Eliminate potable water use by plant species, drip irrigation and captured rainwater   Site doesn’t recycle wastewater or have access to water supplied by a public agency for non- potable usesCopyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
  19. 19. WE 2 – Innovative Wastewater Technologies   Opt 1 – Reduce building sewage conveyance by 50%. Even replacing 3 water closets with low flow would only reduce flow by 31%.   Opt 2 – Treat 50% of wastewater on-site to tertiary standardsCopyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
  20. 20. WE 3.1 – Water Use Reduction 20% ReductionCopyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
  21. 21. WE 3.2 – Water Use Reduction 30% ReductionCopyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
  22. 22. EA p1 – Fundamental Commissioning   1. Commisioning Agent: Barb   5. Verify Installation and Yankee Performance including: Installation Inspections and   2. OPR and BOD Systems Performance Testing   3. Commissioning   6. Complete Summary Requirements in Construction Commissioning Report Documents especially for geo- thermal and solar PV   4. Commissioning Plan especially for geo-thermal and solar PVCopyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
  23. 23. EA p1 – Fundamental Commissioning   Owner’s Project Requirements   Basis of Design   Requirement: Residential   Primary Design   Sustainability Goal: LEED Assumptions: residential, no Platinum redundancy, humid watershed   Energy Efficiency Goal: Net- zero energy use   Standards: City of Cincinnati building codes, LEED   Indoor Enviro. Req: requirements Occupancy intelligent   Narrative Description: Geo-   System Expectations: Highly thermal HVAC, automatic automated and low lighting systems, geo- maintenance thermal hot water, on-site   Building Occupant Req: Solar PV Medium level of trainingCopyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
  24. 24. EA p2 – Minimum Energy Performance   ASHRAE/IESNA 90.1-2004 Doesn’t apply to low rise residential buildings, single family houses, multi-family structures of three habitable stories or fewer above grade, manufactured housing or buildings that do not use either electricity or fossil fuel.   Min/Existing Above roof R15/40 Walls R13/10 Slab floor R7.5/0Copyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
  25. 25. EA p2 – Minimum Energy Performance   Walls are 35% glazing requiring Solar heat Gain Coefficients of:   North .36   All .25   The Solar Heat Gain Coefficient (SHGC) measures how well a window blocks heat from sunlight. The SHGC is the fraction of the heat from the sun that enters through a window.   The Boulter House SHGC is expressed project can’t as a number comply with this between 0 and 1. The lower a windows prerequisite SHGC, the less solar without adding heat it transmits. additional floor and wall insulationCopyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
  26. 26. EA p3 – Fundamental Refrigerant Management   Replace or retrofit the CFC-based refrigerants in existing base building HVAC&RCopyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
  27. 27. EA c1 – Optimize Energy PerformanceCopyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
  28. 28. EA c1 – Optimize Energy Performance   Dual-Pane Metal Frame tinted low-E glass doors and windows are required with thermal break   Ambient Lighting Power Density should average .898 w/sf   Boulter House living room is 18’ x 28’ = 504 sf   28 40w showcase lamps = 1120 watts   Need to replace with LED showcase lampsCopyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
  29. 29. EA c1 – Optimize Energy Performance   Carport glass needs to be replaced with Dual-Pane Metal Frame tinted low-E glass doors and windows with thermal break. May use NanaWall.   21% Improvement over EA p1 is needed for LEED Platinum 52 PointsCopyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
  30. 30. EA c1 – Optimize Energy Performance   Installing NanaWall on both sides of carport breeze way will allow the space to againCopyright 2009 Chuck Lohre be used as designed by FLW
  31. 31. EA c2 & ID – On-Site Renewable Energy   Install geo-thermal and Solar PV for 17.5% Cost reductionCopyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
  32. 32. EA c3 – Enhanced Commissioning   Conduct commissioning   Develop systems manual design review prior to mid-construction   Verify training requirements documents   Review building operation within 10   Review contractor months after substantial completion submittalsCopyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
  33. 33. EA c4 – Enhanced Refrigerant Management   Specify “Natural refrigerants” including water, carbon dioxide or ammonia for new ACCopyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
  34. 34. EA c5 – Measurement & Verification   International Performance Measurement and Verification Protocol IPMVP  Option B: Direct Measureme nt of On-site Renewable Energy Copyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
  35. 35. EA c6 – Green Power   Estimated 2008 energy usage is $3900   EA p2 provides for Minimum Energy Performance $2700/yr ($1 per sf/yr)   EA c1 provides for at least 21% (6 point) improvement then $2133/yr   EA c2 On-Site Renewable Energy (3 points) provides for at least 17.5% of EAc1 then $1760/yr   EA c6 Green Power – electric is about 47% - $827 * .7 = $578 for the two year contract plus about $170 additional surcharge per year.Copyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
  36. 36. MR p1– Storage & Collection of Recyclables   Recycle paper, cardboard, plastics 1 & 2, metal and glass   Purchase items with minimal or no packaging   Use filtered water   Buy local produce and meat products   Compost all cooking and yard wasteCopyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
  37. 37. MR c1.1 & 1.2 – Building Reuse Maintain 95% of Existing Walls, Floors & RoofCopyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
  38. 38. MR c1.3 – Building Reuse Maintain 50% of Interior Non-Structural ElementsCopyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
  39. 39. MR c2.1 & 2.2 – Construction Waste Management - Divert 75% from Disposal   Wood from carport window replacement will be recycled   Glass removed will be delivered to Tri-State Glass to be sandwiched with a second piece to make the dual pane replacementCopyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
  40. 40. MR c3.1& 3.2 Materials Reuse 10%   Glass removed will be sandwiched (refurbished) with a second piece to make the dual pane replacement   Storm door and screen door for front door will be reused/purchased from Building ValueCopyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
  41. 41. MR c4.1, 4.2 & ID Recycled Content 40%   New glass has 26% recycled content $520   Nana Wall has 10% recycled content $1000   $1330 total required for 40% of material valueCopyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
  42. 42. MR c5.1 & 5.2 Regional Materials 20%   Window glass $2000   Paint $250   Window Bottom Rail Rapidly Renewable Wood $1000   Storm door from Building Value $50   $2660 total neededCopyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
  43. 43. MR c6.1 & 6.2 Rapidly Renewable Materials 5%   Window Bottom Rail Rapidly Renewable Wood $1000   $660 total neededCopyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
  44. 44. MR c7 – Certified Wood NanaWall FSC AvailableCopyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
  45. 45. MR Summary c3 thru c7 ValuesCopyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
  46. 46. EQ p1 – Minimum IAQ Performance   Using ASHRAE 62.2-2004 for low rise residential   Kitchen and one bath have ventilation   Second floor bath needs ventilationCopyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
  47. 47. EQ p2 – Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ETS) Control   Opt 1 No smoking   Opt 2 Designated smoking areas   Option 3 (Residential) Minimize uncontrolled pathwaysCopyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
  48. 48. EQ c1 – Outdoor Air Delivery Monitoring   For mechanically ventilated spaces provide a direct outdoor airflow measurement device   For naturally ventilated spaces monitor CO2 ConcentrationsCopyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
  49. 49. EQ c2 – Increased Ventilation   For mechanically ventilated spaces increase breathing zone ventilation by 30% over EQ p1   Design naturally ventilated spaces for occupied spaces to meet Carbon Trust Good Practice Guide 237 and show system meets CIBSE or use analytic model to predict 90% will meet ASHRAE 62.1-2004Copyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
  50. 50. EQ c3.1 & 3.2 – Construction IAQ Management Plan   Not attempting these credits because there is no interior constructionCopyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
  51. 51. EQ c4.1 – Low Emitting Materials Adhesives and Sealants   All adhesives and sealants used to install windows and NanaWalls will meet South Coast Air Quality Management District VOC limitsCopyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
  52. 52. EQ c4.2 – Low Emitting Materials Paints & Coatings   The interior of the home will be finally painted to match the new color on the fireplace. This credit was needed to meet Regional MR 5 requirementsCopyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
  53. 53. EQ c4.3 – Low Emitting Materials Carpet Systems   This Credit isn’t attempted   Any area carpets installed will meet the Carpet & Rug Institute’s Green Label Plus standardsCopyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
  54. 54. EQ c4.3 – Low Emitting Materials Composite Wood & Agrifiber Products   This Credit isn’t attempted   Any products installed will contain no added urea-formaldehydeCopyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
  55. 55. EQ c5 – Indoor Chemical & Pollutant Source Control   This Credit isn’t attempted   Maintain entry mats   Hazardous gases or chemicals are stored outside the home   Install a MERV 13 air filter on ACCopyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
  56. 56. EQ c6.1 – Controllability of Systems Lighting   Provide individual lighting controls for 90% of the building occupants   And provide lighting system controllability for all shared multi-occupant spacesCopyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
  57. 57. EQ c6.2 – Controllability of Systems Thermal Comfort   Provide individual comfort   And provide comfort system controls for 50% of the controllability for all shared building occupants multi-occupant spacesCopyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
  58. 58. EQ c7.1 –Thermal Comfort Design   Evaluate air temperature, radiant temperature, air speed and relative humidity in an integrated fashion   And coordinate these criteria with EQ Prerequisite 1, EQ Credit 1 and EQ Credit 2Copyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
  59. 59. EQ c7.2 – Thermal Comfort Verification   Survey the spouse (and Peavey and Penny) within a period of six to 18 months after Certification   Agree to develop a plan for corrective action if more than 20% are dissatisfiedCopyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
  60. 60. EQ c8.1 & 8.2 – Daylight & Views Daylight 75% of Spaces   The bath tub room on the second floor doesn’t have a window because the Boulters ask Wright not to install the window because they didn’t like the view of the international style homes to the eastCopyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
  61. 61. EQ c8.1 & 8.2 – Daylight & Views Views for 90% of Spaces   The narrow windows needed a building code waiver because they are too small for egressCopyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
  62. 62. ID c1.1 to 1.4 Innovation in Design   1.1 Site Development 5.1 –   1.3 On-site Renewable Energy Restore Habitat   1.4 Education   1.2 Site Development 5.2 – Maximize Open SpaceCopyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
  63. 63. ID c1.5 - LEED APCopyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
  64. 64. ID c1.5 - LEED APCopyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
  65. 65. ID c1.5 - LEED APCopyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
  66. 66. ID c1.5 - LEED APCopyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
  67. 67. ID c1.5 - LEED APCopyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
  68. 68. ID c1.5 - LEED APCopyright 2009 Chuck Lohre
  69. 69. ID c1.5 - LEED APCopyright 2009 Chuck Lohre

×