Community Media Christopher E. Renner Citizens for Independent Media
Agenda <ul><li>Points of Departure </li></ul><ul><li>Public Interest Obligations </li></ul><ul><li>Will America’s Democrac...
<ul><li>“Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for dinner.  Liberty is a well-armed lamb, contesting t...
State of Television and Radio <ul><li>Media – radio, television, film, internet, and print –has never played a more import...
Public Interest Obligations <ul><li>The government provides broadcasters free and exclusive access to a portion of the pub...
Erosion of Public Interest <ul><li>In 1981, broadcasters abandoned their voluntary code of conduct, which had established ...
Erosion of Public Interest <ul><li>In 1987, the FCC repealed provisions of the Fairness doctrine, which required broadcast...
Further Erosion <ul><li>In 1996, Congress passed a telecommunications deregulation bill, under great pressure from corpora...
Consolidation <ul><li>In 2003, under Republican and corporate pressure, the FCC eliminated a wide range of media concentra...
What consolidation did…
Take from: Mother Jones, Vol 32, No. 2, March- April 2007.  Graph by Dmitry Krasny.
Results <ul><li>The erosion of broadcaster public interest obligations and consolidation has left Americans to ask whether...
Will America’s Democracy Get Covered? Putting Democracy Back in the Hands of the Views & Voters <ul><li>“ A popular govern...
Will America’s Democracy Get Covered? Putting Democracy Back in the Hands of the Views & Voters <ul><li>Broadcasters are r...
Will America’s Democracy Get Covered? Putting Democracy Back in the Hands of the Views & Voters <ul><li>Voters rely on loc...
Will America’s Democracy Get Covered? Putting Democracy Back in the Hands of the Views & Voters <ul><li>Coverage of Congre...
Will America’s Democracy Get Covered? Putting Democracy Back in the Hands of the Views & Voters <ul><li>When asked where t...
Will America’s Democracy Get Covered? Putting Democracy Back in the Hands of the Views & Voters <ul><li>That Iraq and al-Q...
Will America’s Democracy Get Covered? Putting Democracy Back in the Hands of the Views & Voters <ul><li>Media Matters issu...
Will America’s Democracy Get Covered? Putting Democracy Back in the Hands of the Views & Voters <ul><li>Key Findings: </li...
The Media Reform Movement <ul><li>Our Democracy is now put to a vital test, for the conflict is between human rights on th...
Media Reform <ul><li>The birth of the media reform movement reflects a growing awareness that media reform is essential to...
Media Reform Organizations <ul><li>Fairness & Accuracy In Reporting  (FAIR) (the #1 media watchdog group) </li></ul><ul><l...
Media Reform Goals <ul><li>Media reform means gaining the power to speak and be heard, and that means taking some of that ...
Media Reform Means Change <ul><li>I want truly democratic media because 45 million Americans don’t have health insurance, ...
National Conference on Media Reform <ul><li>The conference is for anybody who wants to be involved in efforts to reform ou...
National Conference on Media Reform  <ul><li>Moving beyond critique to action, the 2003 National Conference on Media Refor...
Community Bridge: the progressive alternative to talk radio <ul><li>Community Bridge  is an example of &quot;open content&...
Goal and objectives <ul><li>The goals of  Community Bridge  are: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>to increase awareness and understan...
Program planning <ul><li>I work one semester out - am already planning summer shows; by July will have autumn schedule pla...
PR and webpage <ul><li>Member of the National Federation of Community Broadcasters and a faithful reader of  Hear 2.0 </li...
What is Community Media? <ul><li>Freedom of speech is vital to a democratic society and is a right guaranteed in the U. S....
Community Media Resources <ul><li>National Federation of Community Broadcasters  http://www. nfcb .org  </li></ul><ul><li>...
Community Radio Stations <ul><li>Prometheus Radio Project   believes that a free, diverse, and democratic media is critica...
Flint Hills Community Radio <ul><li>In early Spring 07, the FCC announced they would accept applications for full-power no...
Mission Statement: <ul><li>We envision developing a station that uses an independent community-radio model to stimulate, e...
Service Area
Citizen Journalism <ul><li>The station will be ran by volunteers, with a small paid staff for administrative needs. </li><...
Programming Mock-Up
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Community Media

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Community presentation about the role media plays in US democracy and why media reform is necessary for our democracy to remain healthy and sound.

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Transcript of "Community Media"

  1. 1. Community Media Christopher E. Renner Citizens for Independent Media
  2. 2. Agenda <ul><li>Points of Departure </li></ul><ul><li>Public Interest Obligations </li></ul><ul><li>Will America’s Democracy Get Covered? </li></ul><ul><li>Media Reform </li></ul><ul><li>Community Bridge radio show </li></ul><ul><li>Flint Hills Community Radio </li></ul>
  3. 3. <ul><li>“Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for dinner. Liberty is a well-armed lamb, contesting the vote.” </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Benjamin Franklin </li></ul></ul></ul>
  4. 4. State of Television and Radio <ul><li>Media – radio, television, film, internet, and print –has never played a more important role in our lives. </li></ul><ul><li>It is our primary source of news and entertainment. 1 </li></ul><ul><li>It shape how we see the world and how the world see us. </li></ul><ul><li>1. Horrigan, J., Garret, K., & Resnick, p. (2004). The Internet and Democratic Debate. Pew Internet and American Life Project and the University of Michigan School of Information; Cooper, M. (n. d.) Media Ownership and Democracy in the Digital Information Age, Center for Internet & Society, Stanford Law School; Carter, S., Fico, F., & McCabe, J. (2002). Partisan and Structural Balance in Local Television Election Coverage, Journalism and Mass Communications Quarterly, Vol. 79, p, 42; Norris, P. (2002). Revolution, What Revolution? The Internet and U. S. Elections, 1992 – 2000. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Public Interest Obligations <ul><li>The government provides broadcasters free and exclusive access to a portion of the public airwaves – “spectrum” – for broadcasting. </li></ul><ul><li>The profitable licenses come in exchange for broadcaster’s commitment to serve the “public interest, convenience, or necessity.” </li></ul><ul><li>These basic obligations, called public interest obligations, are critical tools designed to ensure that television and radio are at least partially grounded in today’s reality. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Erosion of Public Interest <ul><li>In 1981, broadcasters abandoned their voluntary code of conduct, which had established programming and advertising standards through industry self-regulation. </li></ul><ul><li>In 1984, the FCC eliminated the ascertainment requirements whereby broadcasters had to reach out to the public, determine local community needs, address those needs through their programming and defend those choices in their license renewal process. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Erosion of Public Interest <ul><li>In 1987, the FCC repealed provisions of the Fairness doctrine, which required broadcasters to provide reasonable opportunities for contrasting and dissenting views on controversial topics. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Further Erosion <ul><li>In 1996, Congress passed a telecommunications deregulation bill, under great pressure from corporate giants, that allows further consolidation in radio and television markets. </li></ul>
  9. 9. Consolidation <ul><li>In 2003, under Republican and corporate pressure, the FCC eliminated a wide range of media concentration protections, allowing a single company to own: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>eight radio stations, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>three television stations, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>the only daily newspaper, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>the dominate cable TV provider, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>and the largest Internet Service Provider in a single community. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>It allows media conglomerates to control TV stations that serve up to 90 percent of all Americans. </li></ul>
  10. 10. What consolidation did…
  11. 11. Take from: Mother Jones, Vol 32, No. 2, March- April 2007. Graph by Dmitry Krasny.
  12. 12. Results <ul><li>The erosion of broadcaster public interest obligations and consolidation has left Americans to ask whether broadcasters are: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>really serving their local communities, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>whether they are meeting the diverse needs of all Americans who own the airwaves, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>and whether they are contributing to a vibrant and well informed democracy. </li></ul></ul>
  13. 13. Will America’s Democracy Get Covered? Putting Democracy Back in the Hands of the Views & Voters <ul><li>“ A popular government without popular information, or the means of acquiring it, is but a prologue to a farce, or a tragedy, or perhaps both.” </li></ul><ul><li>- James Madison, 1822. </li></ul>
  14. 14. Will America’s Democracy Get Covered? Putting Democracy Back in the Hands of the Views & Voters <ul><li>Broadcasters are required to afford “reasonable access” to legally qualified candidates for federal elected office, or to “permit the purchase of reasonable amounts of time.” </li></ul><ul><li>But what about news coverage of candidates and issues of importance to voters? </li></ul>
  15. 15. Will America’s Democracy Get Covered? Putting Democracy Back in the Hands of the Views & Voters <ul><li>Voters rely on local television and radio to help them make decisions. 3 </li></ul><ul><li>In the 2002 election, over half of the evening local newscasts contained no campaign coverage at all in the seven weeks leading up to the election. 4 </li></ul>3. The Tough Job of Communicating with Voters. Pew Research Center for the People & the Press (February 5, 2000). 4. Local TV News Coverage of the 2002 General; Elections (2003). The Lear Center Local News Archive at the Annenburg School of Communication, University of Southern California.
  16. 16. Will America’s Democracy Get Covered? Putting Democracy Back in the Hands of the Views & Voters <ul><li>Coverage of Congressional, state, and local issues is even worse. Less than one-half of one percent of programming is devoted to local public affairs. 5 </li></ul><ul><li>The average Presidential sound bite fell from 43 seconds in 1968 to 8-9 seconds in 2004. 6 </li></ul>5. All Politics is Local, But You Wouldn’t Know It by Watching Local TV: Less than One Half of One Percent of Programming is Local Public Affairs (2003). Alliance for Better Campaigns. 6. Copps, M., (2004). Referenced from speech given at Public Interest, Public Airwaves Coalition Meeting. Available at: http://hraunfoss.fcc.gov/edocs_public/attachmatch/DOC-249769A1.doc.
  17. 17. Will America’s Democracy Get Covered? Putting Democracy Back in the Hands of the Views & Voters <ul><li>When asked where they get most of their news, 19 percent said newspapers and 80 percent said radio and TV. 7 </li></ul><ul><li>“Those who received most of their news from Fox News were three times more likely” to hold the following misconceptions: 8 </li></ul>7. Misperceptions, the Media and the Iraq War (2003). Program on International Policy Attitudes, Center on Policy Attitudes and the Center for international and Security Studies, University of Maryland. 8. Ibid.
  18. 18. Will America’s Democracy Get Covered? Putting Democracy Back in the Hands of the Views & Voters <ul><li>That Iraq and al-Qaeda are linked together (they are not) </li></ul><ul><li>The existence of weapons of mass destruction (there have been none found) </li></ul><ul><li>The nature of world public opinion (Fox portrays the world as supporting US efforts in Iraq; the fact is that the world does not.) 8 </li></ul>8. Misperceptions, the Media and the Iraq War (2003). Program on International Policy Attitudes, Center on Policy Attitudes and the Center for international and Security Studies, University of Maryland.
  19. 19. Will America’s Democracy Get Covered? Putting Democracy Back in the Hands of the Views & Voters <ul><li>Media Matters issued If It’s Sunday, It’s Still Conservative in April ‘07. </li></ul><ul><li>This report looks at the four major Sunday news programs: Meet the Press, This Week, Face the Nation, and Fox News Sunday. </li></ul>
  20. 20. Will America’s Democracy Get Covered? Putting Democracy Back in the Hands of the Views & Voters <ul><li>Key Findings: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Republicans and conservatives had the advantage on every show in every category measured by a margin of 44 to 27 percent. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Counting only elected officials and administration representatives Republicans had a 62 to 37 percent advantage. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Conservative journalist were twice as likely to appear as their progressive counterparts. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>To download the report go to: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>mediamatters.org/sundayshowreport/ </li></ul></ul>
  21. 21. The Media Reform Movement <ul><li>Our Democracy is now put to a vital test, for the conflict is between human rights on the one side, and on the other, special privilege asserted as property rights. The parting of the ways has come.” </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Theodore Roosevelt </li></ul></ul></ul>
  22. 22. Media Reform <ul><li>The birth of the media reform movement reflects a growing awareness that media reform is essential to fostering a functional democracy and advancing issues that most people actually care about. </li></ul><ul><li>Numerous organizations are working to make the media reform movement a more bold and proactive force to advance meaningful media policy in the public interest. </li></ul>
  23. 23. Media Reform Organizations <ul><li>Fairness & Accuracy In Reporting (FAIR) (the #1 media watchdog group) </li></ul><ul><li>Media Channel (check out their Issue Guides) </li></ul><ul><li>Free Press </li></ul><ul><li>Center for Public Integrity </li></ul><ul><li>Media Matters (exposes conservative misinformation in media) </li></ul><ul><li>Media Transparency (exposes the right-wing foundations and institutes that influence much of when ends up in the mass media) </li></ul><ul><li>Reclaim the Media (working on federal media policy and local media reform in Seattle area) </li></ul><ul><li>Media Tank (working on federal media policy and local media reform in Philadelphia area) </li></ul><ul><li>Center for Media and Democracy </li></ul>
  24. 24. Media Reform Goals <ul><li>Media reform means gaining the power to speak and be heard, and that means taking some of that power from those who have it now. </li></ul><ul><li>Done right, media reform is dangerous. </li></ul>
  25. 25. Media Reform Means Change <ul><li>I want truly democratic media because 45 million Americans don’t have health insurance, and many of them believe it’s their fault. </li></ul><ul><li>I want better media because black and brown kids go to jail because of what people read in the paper about “superpredators.” </li></ul><ul><li>I want democratic media because public TV has said that a family with lesbian mothers is unfit to be acknowledged on the network you and I pay for. </li></ul><ul><li>I want a truly democratic media system because if we had one, tens of thousands of people who have died in Iraq might be alive today. </li></ul>
  26. 26. National Conference on Media Reform <ul><li>The conference is for anybody who wants to be involved in efforts to reform our media. Activists, policymakers, journalists and other media workers, scholars, students, artists, and concerned citizens will all find opportunities to learn, share, network, and engage at the conference. </li></ul>
  27. 27. National Conference on Media Reform <ul><li>Moving beyond critique to action, the 2003 National Conference on Media Reform in Madison, WI was a groundbreaking forum attended by over 1700 participants striving work together toward solutions for our broken media system. </li></ul><ul><li>The 2005 Conference was held in St. Louis and had more than 2,500 activists, educators, policymakers, journalists and concerned citizens from across the country and around the world. </li></ul><ul><li>The 2007 Conference was held in Memphis, TN; had over 3,500 in attendance and another 2,000 connected via streaming video and audio. </li></ul><ul><li>Website: http://www.freepress.net/conference/ </li></ul>
  28. 28. Community Bridge: the progressive alternative to talk radio <ul><li>Community Bridge is an example of &quot;open content&quot; media. </li></ul><ul><li>It is the direct result of a comment on a KSDB talk show in which Brokeback Mountain was referred to as “bareback” mountain. </li></ul><ul><li>That comment resulted in a formal complaint being filed with the FCC as well as protest letters being placed in KSDB’s public file. </li></ul>
  29. 29. Goal and objectives <ul><li>The goals of Community Bridge are: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>to increase awareness and understanding on current issues from a progressive point of view </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>to promote collaboration and engagement between the KSU community and the broader community of Manhattan </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>to demonstrate community-radio programming that models civil public discourse on a broad variety of issues. </li></ul></ul>
  30. 30. Program planning <ul><li>I work one semester out - am already planning summer shows; by July will have autumn schedule planned </li></ul><ul><li>Focus on voices not heard on mainstream media </li></ul><ul><li>Keep programming local in focus </li></ul>
  31. 31. PR and webpage <ul><li>Member of the National Federation of Community Broadcasters and a faithful reader of Hear 2.0 </li></ul><ul><li>Use a variety of PR to promote the program - ads, announcements, flyers </li></ul><ul><li>Webpage </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Currently use plogspot.com </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>http://communitybridge.blogspot.com </li></ul></ul>
  32. 32. What is Community Media? <ul><li>Freedom of speech is vital to a democratic society and is a right guaranteed in the U. S. Constitution. Community Media allows access to the tools of free speech. </li></ul><ul><li>Community Media is a movement to take back the airwaves/presses from corporate interests. </li></ul><ul><li>Community Media can be public, educational and governmental (PEG) access television channels; non-commercial radio; the Internet, or newspapers. </li></ul>
  33. 33. Community Media Resources <ul><li>National Federation of Community Broadcasters http://www. nfcb .org </li></ul><ul><li>Alliance for Community Media (PEG access TV) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>http:// ourchannels .org </li></ul></ul><ul><li>National Center for Community Media http:// huckboyd . jmc . ksu .edu/ </li></ul><ul><li>Community Media Center of Grand Rapids http://www. mediamouse .org/ griid </li></ul><ul><li>Portland Community Media http://www.pcmtv.org/ </li></ul><ul><li>Community Media Association (United Kingdom) http://www.commedia.org.uk/ </li></ul>
  34. 34. Community Radio Stations <ul><li>Prometheus Radio Project believes that a free, diverse, and democratic media is critical to the political and cultural health of our nation. </li></ul><ul><li>Salina Community Access Television </li></ul><ul><li>KKFI 90.1 FM Kansas City http://www. kkfi .org/ </li></ul><ul><li>KGNU Bolder/Denver http://www.kgnu.org/ </li></ul><ul><li>WDYN Independent Radio Rochester NY http://www.wdyn.net/ </li></ul><ul><li>WORT Madison WI http:// wort -fm.org/ </li></ul><ul><li>WERU Maine http://www. weru .org/ </li></ul><ul><li>KAFI Mennapolis-St. Paul http://www. kfai .org/ </li></ul>
  35. 35. Flint Hills Community Radio <ul><li>In early Spring 07, the FCC announced they would accept applications for full-power non-commercial stations. </li></ul><ul><li>An ad hoc committee was formed to support the application process with UFM Community Learning Center as the applicant and representatives from the League of Women Voters, Manhattan Alliance for Peace and Justice, the Campaign for Nonviolence, Citizens for Independent Media, Flint Hills Human Rights Project, Manhattan Mennonite Church, with participation from the African American and Hispanic communities. </li></ul><ul><li>A construction permit was awarded in October ‘08. </li></ul>
  36. 36. Mission Statement: <ul><li>We envision developing a station that uses an independent community-radio model to stimulate, educate and entertain our audience; to reflect the diversity of the local and world community; and, to provide a channel for individuals and groups, issues and music that have been overlooked, suppressed or under-represented by other area media. </li></ul>
  37. 37. Service Area
  38. 38. Citizen Journalism <ul><li>The station will be ran by volunteers, with a small paid staff for administrative needs. </li></ul><ul><li>Volunteers will participate in citizen journalism class and will have to complete a set curriculum before going on air. </li></ul>
  39. 39. Programming Mock-Up

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