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Exploring a Route Toward Adoption of the Common Core. University of Wisconsin-Madison, Christopher Lehman, American Education Week, November 20, 2013
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Exploring a Route Toward Adoption of the Common Core. University of Wisconsin-Madison, Christopher Lehman, American Education Week, November 20, 2013

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University of Wisconsin-Madison American Education Week address by Christopher Lehman, "Exploring a Route Toward Adoption of the Common Core." Live and online audience.

University of Wisconsin-Madison American Education Week address by Christopher Lehman, "Exploring a Route Toward Adoption of the Common Core." Live and online audience.

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  • 1. Exploring a Route Toward Adoption of the Common Core ! Christopher Lehman ! American Education Week University of Wisconsin-Madison November 20, 2013 All contents of this presentation: © Christopher Lehman 2013 unless otherwise stated. Every effort has been made to cite material adherent to copyright law. If an error appears to have been made please contact and the request will be handled immediately.
  • 2. #AEW2013 ! @UWMadEducation ! @iChrisLehman
  • 3. image by mistagregory
  • 4. “Boys who have known how difficult school can be from the very start, boys who have always had to work harder and longer than everyone else just to receive marginal grades, boys who have had to give up their summers to school sessions because their test scores are not deemed sufficient, boys who know what it is to be intellectually impaired and to try their hardest despite their difficulties; these boys cried. ! Testing: Are percentage of students crying valuable data? Christopher Lehman, SmartBrief SmartBlog on Education May 2013
  • 5. “I consoled them as well as I could. I promised them that doing their best was something to be proud of. I gave them time to compose themselves before they returned to class after three hours of giving everything they had to a task they could not complete. I told them I would call home to let their parents know that they worked as hard as they could. ! Testing: Are percentage of students crying valuable data? Christopher Lehman, SmartBrief SmartBlog on Education May 2013
  • 6. When I left them in their classrooms, I talked to other teachers and learned that a student threw up, another child banged his head against the wall, and many other students across the grades could not finish their tests within the time allotted. ! ! Testing: Are percentage of students crying valuable data? Christopher Lehman, SmartBrief SmartBlog on Education May 2013
  • 7. “I thought about the third day of testing to take place tomorrow, another three hours of a test that these students cannot read and understand. I also thought about these boys and their small heroic acts of tackling tests so far above their ability that to even finish them became impossible, and I cried. What are we teaching these children, and why?” Testing: Are percentage of students crying valuable data? Christopher Lehman, SmartBrief SmartBlog on Education May 2013
  • 8. NAEP 2012 Trends in Academic Progress http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/subject/publications/main2012/pdf/2013456.pdf
  • 9. NAEP 2012 Trends in Academic Progress http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/subject/publications/main2012/pdf/2013456.pdf
  • 10. Highlights from PISA 2009: Performance of 15 Y.O. http://nces.ed.gov/pubs2011/2011004.pdf
  • 11. Highlights from PISA 2009: Performance of 15 Y.O. http://nces.ed.gov/pubs2011/2011004.pdf
  • 12. UNICEF Innocenti: Child Poverty in Rich Countries 2005 http://www.unicef-irc.org/publications/pdf/repcard6e.pdf
  • 13. “When the tests are aligned with the common standards, the curriculum will line up as well—and it will unleash a powerful market of people providing services for better teaching. For the first time, there will be a large uniform base of customers looking at using products that can help every kid learn and every teacher get better. Imagine having the people who create electrifying video games applying their intelligence to online tools that pull kids in and make algebra fun.” ! - Bill Gates 2009 National Conference of State Legislatures gatesfoundation.org
  • 14. “Dear world, I just want to teach. That's it. I'm a good teacher but my life is being taken over by paperwork/ minutia in order to prove it.” – Sarah
  • 15. image by mistagregory
  • 16. DECIDE ASK CHANGE GO LEARN CHALLENGE LISTEN REFLECT QUESTION GUIDE FIGHT HEAR WONDER GROW BELIEVE SUPPORT BE image by gregor y text by Christopher Lehman
  • 17. Route to achievement?
  • 18. Pedagogical Shifts demanded by the Common Core State Standards There are twelve shifts that the Common Core requires of us if we are to be truly aligned with it in terms of curricular materials and classroom instruction. There are six shifts in Mathematics and six shifts in ELA/ Literacy. Shifts in ELA/Literacy Shift 1 Balancing Informational & Literary Text Students read a true balance of informational and literary texts. Shift 2 Knowledge in the Disciplines Students build knowledge about the world (domains/ content areas) through TEXT rather than the teacher or activities Shift 3 Staircase of Complexity Students read the central, grade appropriate text around which instruction is centered. Teachers are patient, create more time and space and support in the curriculum for close reading. Shift 4 Text-based Answers Students engage in rich and rigorous evidence based conversations about text. Shift 5 Writing from Sources Writing emphasizes use of evidence from sources to inform or make an argument. Shift 6 Academic Vocabulary Students constantly build the transferable vocabulary they need to access grade level complex texts. This can be done effectively by spiraling like content in increasingly complex texts. Shift 1 Focus Teachers significantly narrow and deepen the scope of how time and energy is spent in the math classroom. They do so in order to focus deeply on only the concepts that are prioritized in the standards. Shift 2 Coherence Principals and teachers carefully connect the learning within and across grades so that students can build new understanding onto foundations built in previous years. Shift 3 Fluency Students are expected to have speed and accuracy with simple calculations; teachers structure class time and/or homework time for students to memorize, through repetition, core functions. Shift 4 Deep Understanding Students deeply understand and can operate easily within a math concept before moving on. They learn more than the trick to get the answer right. They learn the math. Shift 5 Application Students are expected to use math and choose the appropriate concept for application even when they are not prompted to do so. Shift 6 Dual Intensity Students are practicing and understanding. There is more than a balance between these two things in the classroom – both are occurring with intensity. Shifts in Mathematics www.engageNY.org EngageNY.org Pedagogical Shifts demanded by the CCSS
  • 19. Pedagogical Shifts demanded by the Common Core State Standards There are twelve shifts that the Common Core requires of us if we are to be truly aligned with it in terms of curricular materials and classroom instruction. There are six shifts in Mathematics and six shifts in ELA/ Literacy. Shifts in ELA/Literacy Shift 1 Balancing Informational & Literary Text Students read a true balance of informational and literary texts. Shift 2 Knowledge in the Disciplines Students build knowledge about the world (domains/ content areas) through TEXT rather than the teacher or activities Shift 3 Staircase of Complexity Students read the central, grade appropriate text around which instruction is centered. Teachers are patient, create more time and space and support in the curriculum for close reading. Shift 4 Text-based Answers Students engage in rich and rigorous evidence based conversations about text. Shift 5 Writing from Sources Writing emphasizes use of evidence from sources to inform or make an argument. Shift 6 Academic Vocabulary Students constantly build the transferable vocabulary they need to access grade level complex texts. This can be done effectively by spiraling like content in increasingly complex texts. EngageNY.org Shifts in Mathematics Shift Teachers Pedagogical 1 Focusdemanded by significantly narrow and deepen in order to focus deeplyand only theis Shifts the CCSS They do so the scope of how time on energy spent in the math classroom. concepts that are prioritized in the standards.
  • 20. page 6
  • 21. Revised Publishers’ Criteria for the Common Core State Standards in English Language Arts and Literacy, Grades 3–12 David  Coleman  •  Susan  Pimentel INTRODUCTION Developed by two of the lead authors of the Common Core State Standards and revised through conversations with teachers, researchers, and other stakeholders, these criteria are designed to guide publishers and curriculum developers as they work to ensure alignment with the standards in English language arts (ELA) and literacy for history/social studies, science, and technical subjects. The standards are the product of a state-led effort — coordinated by the National Governors Association Center for Best Practices and the Council of Chief State School Officers — and were developed in collaboration with teachers, school administrators, and experts to provide a clear and consistent framework to prepare students for college and the workforce. The criteria articulated below concentrate on the most significant elements of the Common Core State Standards and lay out their implications for aligning materials with the standards. These guidelines are not meant to dictate classroom practice but rather to help ensure that teachers receive effective tools. They are intended to guide teachers, curriculum developers, and publishers to be purposeful and strategic in both what to include and what to exclude in instructional materials. By underscoring what matters most in the standards, the criteria illustrate what shifts must take place in the next generation of curricula, including paring away elements that distract or are at odds with the Common Core State Standards. At the heart of these criteria are instructions for shifting the focus of literacy instruction to center on careful examination of the text itself. In aligned materials, work in reading and writing (as well as speaking and listening) must center on the text under consideration. The standards focus on students reading closely to draw evidence and knowledge from the text and require students to read texts of adequate range and complexity. The criteria outlined below therefore revolve around the texts that students read and the kinds of questions students should address as they write and speak about them. Revised Publisher’s Criteria for the Common Core State Standards http://www.corestandards.org/assets/Publishers_Criteria_for_3-12.pdf The standards and these criteria sharpen the focus on the close connection between comprehension of text and acquisition of knowledge. While the link between comprehension and
  • 22. Tri-State Quality Review Rubric for Lessons & Units: ELA/Literacy (Grades 3-5) and ELA (Grades 6-12) Grade: Literacy Lesson/Unit Title: Version 5 Overall Rating: ! ! ! ! I.!Alignment!to!the!Depth!of!the!CCSS! II.!Key!Shifts!in!the!CCSS! III.!Instructional!Supports! IV.!Assessment! The(lesson/unit(aligns(with(the(letter(and( spirit(of(the(CCSS:( Targets(a(set(of(grade,level(CCSS( ELA/Literacy(standards.(( Includes(a(clear(and(explicit(purpose( for(instruction.(( Selects(text(s)(that(measure(within( the(grade,level(text(complexity(band( and(are(of(sufficient(quality(and(scope( for(the(stated(purpose.(( (i.e.,(presents(vocabulary,(syntax,(text( structures,(levels(of( meaning/purpose,(and(other( qualitative(characteristics(similar(to( CCSS(grade,level(exemplars(in( Appendices(A(&(B)(( In(addition,(for(units:( Integrates(reading,(writing,(speaking( and(listening(so(that(students(apply( and(synthesize(advancing(literacy( skills.( (Grades(3,5)( knowledge(and(their(understanding(of( reading(and(writing(in(social(studies,( the(arts,(science(or(technical(subjects( through(the(coherent(selection(of( texts.(( The(lesson/unit(addresses(key(shifts(in(the(CCSS:( Reading!Text!Closely:(Makes(reading(text(s)(closely,(examining( textual(evidence,(and(discerning(deep(meaning(a(central(focus(of( instruction.(( Text@Based!Evidence:(Facilitates(rich(and(rigorous(evidence,based( discussions(and(writing(about(common(texts(through(a(sequence(of( specific,(thought,provoking,(and(text,dependent(questions( (including,(when(applicable,(questions(about(illustrations,(charts,( diagrams,(audio/video,(and(media).(( Writing!from!Sources:(Routinely(expects(that(students(draw( evidence(from(texts(to(produce(clear(and(coherent(writing(that( informs,(explains,(or(makes(an(argument(in(various(written(forms( (notes,(summaries,(short(responses,(or(formal(essays).(( Academic!Vocabulary:! vocabulary(in(context(throughout(instruction.( In(addition,(for(units:( Increasing!Text!Complexity:!Focuses(students(on(reading(a( progression(of(complex(texts(drawn(from(the(grade,level(band.( Provides(text,centered(learning(that(is(sequenced,(scaffolded(and( supported(to(advance(students(toward(independent(reading(of( complex(texts(at(the(CCR(level.( Building!Disciplinary!Knowledge:((Provides(opportunities(for( students(to(build(knowledge(about(a(topic(or(subject(through( analysis(of(a(coherent(selection(of(strategically(sequenced,(discipline, specific(texts.( Balance!of!Texts:!Within(a(collection(of(grade(level(units(a(balance(of( informational(and(literary(texts(is(included(according(to(guidelines(in( the(CCSS((p.(5).( Balance!of!Writing:(Includes(a(balance(of(on,demand(and(process( writing((e.g.,(multiple(drafts(and(revisions(over(time)(and(short,( focused(research(projects,(incorporating(digital(texts(where( appropriate.( The(lesson/unit(is(responsive(to(varied(student(learning(needs:( Cultivates(student(interest(and(engagement(in(reading,(writing,(and( speaking(about(texts.(( Addresses(instructional(expectations(and(is(easy(to(understand(and(use.( Provides(all(students(with(multiple(opportunities(to(engage(with(text(of( appropriate(complexity(for(the(grade(level;(includes(appropriate( scaffolding(so(that(students(directly(experience(the(complexity(of(the( text.(( Focuses(on(challenging(sections(of(text(s)(and(engages(students(in(a( productive(struggle(through(discussion(questions(and(other(supports(that( build(toward(independence.( Integrates(appropriate(supports(in(reading,(writing,(listening(and(speaking( for(students(who(are(ELL,(have(disabilities,(or(read(well(below(the(grade( level(text(band.( Provides(extensions(and/or(more(advanced(text(for(students(who(read(well( above(the(grade(level(text(band.( In(addition,(for(units:( Includes(a(progression(of(learning(where(concepts(and(skills(advance(and( deepen(over(time.( Gradually(removes(supports,(requiring(students(to(demonstrate(their( independent(capacities.( Provides(for(authentic(learning,(application(of(literacy(skills,(student, directed(inquiry,(analysis,(evaluation,(and/or(reflection.(( Integrates(targeted(instruction(in(such(areas(as(grammar(and( conventions,(writing(strategies,(discussion(rules,(and(all(aspects(of( foundational(reading(for(grades(3,5.(( Includes(independent(reading(based(on(student(choice(and(interest(to( build(stamina,(confidence,(and(motivation;(indicates(how(students(are( accountable(for(that(reading.( Uses(technology(and(media(to(deepen(learning(and(draw(attention(to( evidence(and(texts(as(appropriate.( The(lesson/unit(regularly( assesses(whether(students( are(mastering(standards5 based(content(and(skills:(( Elicits(direct,(observable( evidence(of(the(degree( to(which(a(student(can( independently( demonstrate(the(major( targeted(grade(level( CCSS(standards(with( appropriately(complex( text(s).(( Assesses(student( proficiency(using( methods(that(are( unbiased(and(accessible( to(all(students.((( Includes(aligned(rubrics( or(assessment(guidelines( that(provide(sufficient( guidance(for(interpreting( student(performance.(( In(addition,(for(units:( Uses(varied(modes(of( assessment,(including(a( range(of(pre,(formative,( summative,(and(self, assessment(measures. Rating:!!!!3!!!!!!2!!!!!!1!!!!!!0( Rating:!!!!3!!!!!!2!!!!!!1!!!!!!0( Rating:!!!!3!!!!!!2!!!!!!1!!!!!!0( Rating:!!!!3!!!!!!2!!!!!!1!!!!!!0( Quality(Review(Rubric(developed(by(the(Tri5State(Collaborative((MA,(NY,(RI( (facilitated(by(Achieve)(Version(5,(January(2013( (rubric(for(EQuIP(Quality(Review(( View(Creative(Commons(Attribution(3.0(Unported(License(at(http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/."Educators(may(use(or(adapt.(If(modified,(please(attribute(Tri5State(and(re5title.( Tri-State/EQuiP Rubric http://www.engageny.org/resource/tri-state-quality-review-rubric-and-rating-process
  • 23. Tri-State Quality Review Rubric for Lessons & Units: ELA/Literacy (Grades 3-5) an Grade: Literacy Lesson/Unit Title: ! ! I.!Alignment!to!the!Depth!of!the!CCSS! II.!Key!Shifts!in!the!CCSS! The(lesson/unit(aligns(with(the(letter(and( spirit(of(the(CCSS:( Targets(a(set(of(grade,level(CCSS( ELA/Literacy(standards.(( Includes(a(clear(and(explicit(purpose( for(instruction.(( Selects(text(s)(that(measure(within( the(grade,level(text(complexity(band( and(are(of(sufficient(quality(and(scope( for(the(stated(purpose.(( (i.e.,(presents(vocabulary,(syntax,(text( structures,(levels(of( meaning/purpose,(and(other( qualitative(characteristics(similar(to( CCSS(grade,level(exemplars(in( Appendices(A(&(B)(( In(addition,(for(units:( Integrates(reading,(writing,(speaking( and(listening(so(that(students(apply( and(synthesize(advancing(literacy( skills.( (Grades(3,5)( knowledge(and(their(understanding(of( reading(and(writing(in(social(studies,( the(arts,(science(or(technical(subjects( through(the(coherent(selection(of( texts.(( The(lesson/unit(addresses(key(shifts(in(the(CCSS:( Reading!Text!Closely:(Makes(reading(text(s)(closely,(examining( textual(evidence,(and(discerning(deep(meaning(a(central(focus(of( instruction.(( Text@Based!Evidence:(Facilitates(rich(and(rigorous(evidence,based( discussions(and(writing(about(common(texts(through(a(sequence(of( specific,(thought,provoking,(and(text,dependent(questions( (including,(when(applicable,(questions(about(illustrations,(charts,( diagrams,(audio/video,(and(media).(( Writing!from!Sources:(Routinely(expects(that(students(draw( evidence(from(texts(to(produce(clear(and(coherent(writing(that( informs,(explains,(or(makes(an(argument(in(various(written(forms( (notes,(summaries,(short(responses,(or(formal(essays).(( Academic!Vocabulary:! vocabulary(in(context(throughout(instruction.( In(addition,(for(units:( Increasing!Text!Complexity:!Focuses(students(on(reading(a( progression(of(complex(texts(drawn(from(the(grade,level(band.( Provides(text,centered(learning(that(is(sequenced,(scaffolded(and( supported(to(advance(students(toward(independent(reading(of( complex(texts(at(the(CCR(level.( Building!Disciplinary!Knowledge:((Provides(opportunities(for( students(to(build(knowledge(about(a(topic(or(subject(through( analysis(of(a(coherent(selection(of(strategically(sequenced,(discipline, specific(texts.( Balance!of!Texts:!Within(a(collection(of(grade(level(units(a(balance(of( informational(and(literary(texts(is(included(according(to(guidelines(in( the(CCSS((p.(5).( Balance!of!Writing:(Includes(a(balance(of(on,demand(and(process( writing((e.g.,(multiple(drafts(and(revisions(over(time)(and(short,( focused(research(projects,(incorporating(digital(texts(where( appropriate.( Tri-State/EQuiP Rubric Rating:!!!!3!!!!!!2!!!!!!1!!!!!!0( Rating:!!!!3!!!!!!2!!!!!!1!!!!!!0( The(lesson/unit(is(respo Cultivates(student(in speaking(about(texts Addresses(instructio Provides(all(students appropriate(complex scaffolding(so(that(st text.(( Focuses(on(challengi productive(struggle(t build(toward(indepe Integrates(appropria for(students(who(are level(text(band.( Provides(extensions( above(the(grade(leve In(addition,(for(units:( Includes(a(progressio deepen(over(time.( Gradually(removes(s independent(capacit Provides(for(authent directed(inquiry,(ana Integrates(targeted(i conventions,(writing foundational(reading Includes(independen build(stamina,(confid accountable(for(that Uses(technology(and evidence(and(texts(a http://www.engageny.org/resource/tri-state-quality-review-rubric-and-rating-process
  • 24. “Let go,” I say XXXX, because this is XXXX me and I don’t want to cry. When they XXXX the XXXX of the XXXX tonight, everyone will make XXXX of my XXXX, and I’ll be XXXX as an easy XXXX. A XXXX. I will give no one that XXXX. “Let go!” I can feel XXXX XXXX her from my back. I turn and see XXXX has lifted XXXX off the ground and she’s XXXX in his arms. “Up you go, XXXX,” he says, in a voice he’s XXXX to keep XXXX, and then he carries XXXX off towards my mother.
  • 25. “Let go,” I say harshly, because this is upsetting me and I don’t want to cry. When they televise the replay of the reapings tonight, everyone will make note of my tears, and I’ll be marked as an easy target. A weakling. I will give no one that satisfaction. “Let go!” I can feel someone pulling her from my back. I turn and see Gale has lifted Prim off the ground and she’s thrashing in his arms. “Up you go, Catnip,” he says, in a voice he’s fighting to keep steady, and then he carries Prim off towards my mother. Excerpt from The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins
  • 26. 1. Quality of state standards historically has no effect on student achievement 2. Cut score placement is unrelated to achievement 3. Standards show little historical ability to mitigate achievement variation 4. Within-state differences are greater then across state differences 2012 Brown Center Report on American Education http://www.brookings.edu/~/media/research/files/reports/2012/2/brown%20center/ 0216_brown_education_loveless.pdf
  • 27. “The empirical evidence suggests that the Common Core will have little effect on American students’ achievement. The nation will have to look elsewhere for ways to improve its schools.” 2012 Brown Center Report on American Education http://www.brookings.edu/~/media/research/files/reports/2012/2/brown%20center/ 0216_brown_education_loveless.pdf
  • 28. Pedagogical Shifts demanded by the Common Core State Standards There are twelve shifts that the Common Core requires of us if we are to be truly aligned with it in terms of curricular materials and classroom instruction. There are six shifts in Mathematics and six shifts in ELA/ Literacy. Shifts in ELA/Literacy Shift 1 Balancing Informational & Literary Text Students read a true balance of informational and literary texts. Shift 2 Knowledge in the Disciplines Students build knowledge about the world (domains/ content areas) through TEXT rather than the teacher or activities Shift 3 Staircase of Complexity Students read the central, grade appropriate text around which instruction is centered. Teachers are patient, create more time and space and support in the curriculum for close reading. Shift 4 Text-based Answers Students engage in rich and rigorous evidence based conversations about text. Shift 5 Writing from Sources Writing emphasizes use of evidence from sources to inform or make an argument. Shift 6 Academic Vocabulary Students constantly build the transferable vocabulary they need to access grade level complex texts. This can be done effectively by spiraling like content in increasingly complex texts. Shift 1 Focus Teachers significantly narrow and deepen the scope of how time and energy is spent in the math classroom. They do so in order to focus deeply on only the concepts that are prioritized in the standards. Shift 2 Coherence Principals and teachers carefully connect the learning within and across grades so that students can build new understanding onto foundations built in previous years. Shift 3 Fluency Students are expected to have speed and accuracy with simple calculations; teachers structure class time and/or homework time for students to memorize, through repetition, core functions. Shift 4 Deep Understanding Students deeply understand and can operate easily within a math concept before moving on. They learn more than the trick to get the answer right. They learn the math. Shift 5 Application Students are expected to use math and choose the appropriate concept for application even when they are not prompted to do so. Shift 6 Dual Intensity Students are practicing and understanding. There is more than a balance between these two things in the classroom – both are occurring with intensity. Shifts in Mathematics www.engageNY.org EngageNY.org Pedagogical Shifts demanded by the CCSS images by Christopher Lehman
  • 29. “Our students drive our instruction and the pathway to achieve the CCSS is by engaging them and inspiring them to care about their learning and wonder about their world, asking and answering complex and meaningful questions.” – Melanie
  • 30. Route to achievement is the road of ‘doing.’
  • 31. BecauseISaidIWould.com
  • 32. BecauseISaidIWould.com
  • 33. BecauseISaidIWould.com
  • 34. BecauseISaidIWould.com
  • 35. BecauseISaidIWould.com
  • 36. Doing. • I promise to learn about you, build my curriculum in your honor.
  • 37. image by Christopher Lehman
  • 38. image by Christopher Lehman
  • 39. 11/18/11 V is for Vegetarian Remember that field trip to the farm in second grade? How you petted the friendly lamb, or when you and your friends moo-ed at the silly cow? Yep, those are the same exact animals that might be on your dinner plate tonight. Vegetarianism is the practice of not eating meat, where you eat fruits, vegetables, nuts, and anything not meat related instead. A stricter form of vegetarianism is veganism, where you avoid meat and anything animal related, like honey (which is related to bees) or dairy products (which is related to cows and other animals). I think that more people should become vegetarian. It is eco-friendly, animal-friendly, and health-friendly making it a win-win-win situation. I myself want to go vegetarian, but unfortunately I am not in total control of my life right now and my mom won’t let me. But I’ll show her and all of the meat-eaters of the world, meat doesn’t equal survival! Section One: “I Am Not a Nugget!” Student work from One of the big reasons vegetarianism is supported is to save and protect animals. Energize Research Reading and Writing, Lehman 2012 Whether it’s a cat purring in your lap or cows grazing in the field, they are still living
  • 40. We teach: with respect for our communities and our students. We teach: with an eye on the beauty and fierceness of the human experience. We teach: with deference to a stunningly diverse and complex Earth. No amount of testing should deter us from providing enriching learning experiences for our students. -Susan
  • 41. Doing. • I promise to learn about you, build my curriculum in your honor. ! • I promise to teach to you (not near you, over you, or through you).
  • 42. Teaching “Over or At” You AchieveTheCore.org http://www.achievethecore.org/content/upload/The%20Great%20Fire%20-%20Teacher %20Materials%20-%20v11%20-%20current.pdf
  • 43. Teaching versus telling.
  • 44. Teaching “To” You Decide to stop and reread (close reading) Decide how to reread (lens) Study what you have found (patterns) Have new ideas (understandings) from Falling in Love with Close Reading, Lehman and Roberts, 2013
  • 45. “No matter what the standards are, our focus is still on our students. Not all of our students have been educated with such high standards as these and by doing so, we are working together as a community of teachers and learners to build upon what our students already know and are able to do.” – Brian
  • 46. Doing. • I promise to learn about you, build my curriculum in your honor. ! • I promise to teach to you (not near you, over you, or through you). ! • I promise to allow you time to read, to write, to speak, to listen, and so on.
  • 47. Time
  • 48. Access
  • 49. Access to Books High correlation between reading and test scores (Allington et al, 2010; TCRWP, 2010).
  • 50. Access to Books Study of 70,000 families in 27 nations (Evans et al, 2010): Effect of home access to books = parental education level 2x as father’s occupation > family SES Children in high book count homes more likely to attend 3 more years of schooling than low book count homes
  • 51. Access: Summer Loss Studies Summer loss is not correlated to race, IQ, or gender (Cooper, 1996) Low-income students lose more than two months in reading achievement over the summer, more than any other income group (Cooper, 1996) More than half of the achievement gap between lower and higher income students can be explained by unequal access to summer learning opportunities during elementary school years (Alexander et al. 2007)
  • 52. image by Christopher Lehman
  • 53. image by Christopher Lehman
  • 54. image by Christopher Lehman
  • 55. image by Christopher Lehman
  • 56. image by Julia Reynolds
  • 57. logos property of their respective organizations, their inclusion does not imply endorsement of this presentation
  • 58. “[The CCSS are] still too broad. There is a lack of spiraling...which makes me wonder about the validity, but I see it as still very broad. If teachers try to "master" or "dig deeper" on every standard they will move too slow. In some ways it feels like a rat race! So what do we do? Well, this week we began to take positive steps forward. ” – Ben
  • 59. • Doing. I promise to learn about you, build my curriculum in your honor. ! • I promise to teach to you (not near you, over you, or through you). ! • I promise to allow you time to read, to write, to speak, to listen, and so on. ! • I promise to learn from you, for you, and fight for your future.
  • 60. “Educators across 45 states are openly sharing ideas, increasing their knowledge of the skills needed for students, and working very long and very hard to provide quality instruction for ALL students everywhere! ….Our students are our curriculum.” – Fran
  • 61. public domain
  • 62. image by masaki ikeda
  • 63. “Look at Pinterest, Facebook or Twitter to find creative ideas of how to use objects in useful ways. Tires become planters. Candy containers become a filing system… Whether it’s the CCSS or anything else, one must look at the sunshine instead of the clouds.” – Chris
  • 64. DECIDE ASK CHANGE GO LEARN CHALLENGE LISTEN REFLECT QUESTION GUIDE FIGHT HEAR WONDER GROW BELIEVE SUPPORT BE image by gregor y text by Christopher Lehman
  • 65. Time for Questions ! ! #AEW2013 @iChrisLehman