0
Diane Craig
Chris Bigby
November 2013





On-going social exclusion of people with
intellectual disabilities from the life of the
wider community
Continue t...





Participant-observation study
Supported five people with moderate level of
impairment to participate on an individ...
Community

Organisational

group

context

Cooking group Neighbourhood

Leadership

Central
participant

Paid co-

Helen

...
Hours of
observation
in group

Time period of First group
Word
observations observation
count of
field notes
in group
from...




What influences how community group
participants respond to and support a person
with an intellectual disability to ...



Marketing, negotiating access and planning
Group support
◦ Identifying mentors, contextually based
interpretation of ...








(1) the opportunity to interact in ways that
could facilitate meaningful relationships
(personal, frequent, su...


Leadership response

◦ Differentiated or non-differentiated



Initial anxiety

◦ Fitting in, being manageable
◦ Condi...


Community kitchen as exception
◦ Difference dilemma
◦ Access to expertise
◦ Presence of integrating activity



Featur...
Equal status
membership
Mutually
rewarding
Working
cooperativelycommon goal
Effective use
of expertise to
develop
capacity...
Domain

Mechanism

Operation in group
context

Domain of polity/

Classification

economy

(competence level)

Domain of c...
1.

Dilemmas:
What do you think are some of the tensions for disability
support staff who wish to promote community inclus...


Tensions for disability support staff

◦ Beliefs and practices do not promote active
participation

 Ambivalence about...


Approaching groups and early negotiation
◦ Conditions for meaningful contact (frequency, duration,
structured activity ...


Adequate preparation of people with
intellectual disabilities
◦ Role of person-centred active support



Commitment of...
For more information please contact:

djcraig@students.latrobe.edu.au
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Supporting Inclusion in Community Groups of People with Intellectual Disability - Craig 11 Nov 2013

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Presentation at one day Research to Practice workshop on inclusion for people with intellectual disability held at LaTrobe University in collaboration with ASID vic, 11 Nov 2013.

Published in: Education, Health & Medicine
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Transcript of "Supporting Inclusion in Community Groups of People with Intellectual Disability - Craig 11 Nov 2013"

  1. 1. Diane Craig Chris Bigby November 2013
  2. 2.    On-going social exclusion of people with intellectual disabilities from the life of the wider community Continue to occupy a distinct social space Lack of opportunity to engage in freely chosen relationships with people in the wider community
  3. 3.    Participant-observation study Supported five people with moderate level of impairment to participate on an individual basis in mainstream community groups Data in the form of field notes collected 5-10 months over two years. Supplemented by interviews and secondary documents
  4. 4. Community Organisational group context Cooking group Neighbourhood Leadership Central participant Paid co- Helen house ordinator Men’s shed Community Health Centre Opportunity Paid coordinator and staff Paid manager, voluntary staff National charity and not-forprofit service provider National ‘healthy Voluntary ageing’ interest leadership group Matthew Christian church: Paid leader local parish (church initiative minister) Ruth shop Walking group Community kitchen Phil Sol
  5. 5. Hours of observation in group Time period of First group Word observations observation count of field notes in group from groups Word count of field notes from other sources Helen 54 10 months 08/2010 44,346 13,011 Phil 38 6.5 months 12/2010 34,935 19,455 Matthew 30 4.5 months 04/2011 32,037 11,713 Sol 28 7 months 03/2011 43,786 4,769 Ruth 31 7 months 09/2011 23,144 41,704 other Totals 8,173 181 178,248 75,681
  6. 6.   What influences how community group participants respond to and support a person with an intellectual disability to participate in a community group? What changes to social processes are necessary to promote the active participation of people with intellectual disabilities who have a moderate level of impairment?
  7. 7.   Marketing, negotiating access and planning Group support ◦ Identifying mentors, contextually based interpretation of cues and behaviours, finding activities for the central participant to do in the group and then modelling processes of person centred active support  Support of central participants ◦ Transport, familiar face, reading cues from groups, helping to change behaviour   Getting out of the way Facilitating meaningful contact
  8. 8.     (1) the opportunity to interact in ways that could facilitate meaningful relationships (personal, frequent, sustained over time) (2) contact leads to equal status between people in both groups (3) conditions of contact foster cooperation (4) there is authority support.
  9. 9.  Leadership response ◦ Differentiated or non-differentiated  Initial anxiety ◦ Fitting in, being manageable ◦ Conditions imposed  Discernment process ◦ Group social processes      Expectations (beliefs about right place, wrong place) Taking responsibility (shared across group or designated) Accurate feedback (to adjust to group norms) Familiarity (prior contact-level of comfort and modelling for others) Kindness (presence of genuine warmth and positive regard) ◦ Skills and characteristics of central participant  Use of initiative, be willing to try, people skills. ◦ Access to expertise ◦ Presence of integrating activity
  10. 10.  Community kitchen as exception ◦ Difference dilemma ◦ Access to expertise ◦ Presence of integrating activity  Features of active participation ◦ Equal membership status ◦ Mutually rewarding for participants with and without intellectual disability ◦ Working cooperatively toward a common goal ◦ Effective use of expertise to develop capacity  Continuum of participation
  11. 11. Equal status membership Mutually rewarding Working cooperativelycommon goal Effective use of expertise to develop capacity Community kitchen yes Cooking group yes Op shop Men’s shed no Walking group no yes yes no yes no yes yes no no no yes yes no yes no no
  12. 12. Domain Mechanism Operation in group context Domain of polity/ Classification economy (competence level) Domain of culture Protectionism Inaccuracy of feedback Domain of social Role differentiation Taking responsibility Authority support Positive leadership Expectations settings response Domain of situated activity Meaningful contact Domain of the Empathy person Perspective-taking Familiarity Kindness
  13. 13. 1. Dilemmas: What do you think are some of the tensions for disability support staff who wish to promote community inclusion? What are some of the tensions for community groups who are willing to mentor a person with intellectual disability? 2. 3. Identifying and supporting a group What would you look for in a potential group? What do you think are the first steps to take in negotiation and preparation of groups? How can groups be supported to enable active participation? What are the implications of the findings of the study for policy and practice? How to prepare people with intellectual disabilities for active participation, addressing staff commitment, key structural issues, resources etc.
  14. 14.  Tensions for disability support staff ◦ Beliefs and practices do not promote active participation  Ambivalence about community response to intellectual disability and benefits of individualised, communitybased activity  Desire to protect from discrimination  Resource allocation prioritises group based activity  Risk management culture  Tensions for community groups ◦ Participation of person with intellectual disability may threaten group status quo ◦ Genuine desire to help set against protection of group purpose or level of comfort
  15. 15.  Approaching groups and early negotiation ◦ Conditions for meaningful contact (frequency, duration, structured activity that fosters cooperation) ◦ Authority support ◦ Mentoring role that facilitates shared responsibility ◦ Effective use of expertise ◦ Presence of integrating activity  Group interventions ◦ Shaping expectations, accurate feedback, taking responsibility, building on familiarity, conditions for kindness
  16. 16.  Adequate preparation of people with intellectual disabilities ◦ Role of person-centred active support  Commitment of disability support staff ◦ Addressing ambivalence  Attending to structure ◦ Cooperation between group homes and day centres ◦ Flexible funding options  Resource allocation for promotion of participation ◦ Skilled facilitator and support person
  17. 17. For more information please contact: djcraig@students.latrobe.edu.au
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