L.e.a.r.n....Conflict resolution and guest services

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L.e.a.r.n....Conflict resolution and guest services

  1. 1. L.E.A.R.N.:DAY FOURcreated by and property of christian alexander &lorena perez gomez
  2. 2. THE COMPLAINT IN THIS SECTION, WE WILL ADDRESS DIRECTLY THE MANNER WHICH WE CAN BETTER MANAGE A COMPLAINT SITUATION AND ALSO MAINTAIN CONTROL OVER OUR OWN EMOTIONS WHEN THINGS GET “UGLY”
  3. 3. I’M ALL EARS 3
  4. 4. L.E.A.R.N.. 4 “LEARN” IN ENGLISH OF COURSE MEANS APRENDER. IN THE WORLD OF GUEST SERVICES, L.E.A.R.N. IS A MODEL FOR COMPLAINT RESOLUTION. WHEN FOLLOWED, IT GIVES THE EMPLOYEE A SUCCESSFUL, STEP-BY-STEP MODEL TO RESOLVE ALMOST ANY PROBLEM WHICH THEY MIGHT ENCOUNTER WHEN CONFRONTED WITH A GUEST OR CUSTOMER COMPLAINT. THE LETTERS ACTUALLY REPRESENT FIVE KEY WORDS NECESSARY FOR COMPLAINT RESOLUTION; LISTEN, EMPATHIZE, APOLOGIZE, RESPOND, NOTIFY.
  5. 5. LISTEN 5LISTENING IS THE FIRST KEY STEP TO PROBLEMRESOLUTION. TOO OFTEN, IT IS A TOOL WE IGNORE FORMANY DIFFERENT REASONS. IN ORDER TO UNDERSTANDWHY THE CLIENT IS DISSATISFIED, OR EVEN ANGRY, WEMUST FIRST LISTEN AND FIND OUT WHAT THE PROBLEM IS.WE MUST ALSO LISTEN (AND ASK) TO FIND OUT WHAT THEGUEST WANTS. SOMETIMES, ALL THE GUEST REALLY WANTSIS TO LET US KNOW THAT THERE WAS A PROBLEM AND BEACKNOWLEDGED. OTHER TIMES, THE GUEST EXPECTSSOME TYPE OF COMPENSATION FOR HIS OR HERDISCOMFORT. FAILING TO LISTEN (AND ASK) CAN RESULTIN EITHER NOT SATISFYING THE GUEST OR OVER-COMPENSATING THEM. LISTENING AND BEING LISTENEDTO IS ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT THINGS WE CAN DO TOCREATE STRONG RELATIONSHIPS, WHETHER THOSERELATIONSHIPS BE WITH OUR GUESTS, CO-WORKERS,FRIENDS OR FAMILY.
  6. 6. LISTENING STYLES-OVERVIEW 61. passive/not listening - noise in background - ignoring2. pretend listening - also called responsive listening - using stock nods and smiles and uhum, yes, of course, etc.3. biased/projective listening - selective listening and intentionally disregarding/dismissing the other persons views4. misunderstood listening - unconsciously overlaying your own interpretations and making things fit when they dont5. attentive listening - personally-driven fact gathering and analysis often with manipulation of the other person6. active listening - understanding feelings and gathering facts for largely selfish purposes7. empathic listening - understanding and checking facts and feelings, usually to listeners personal agenda8. facilitative listening - listening, understanding fully, and helping, with the other persons needs uppermost
  7. 7. 1.Passive Listening or Not Listening 7Noise in the background - you are not concentratingon the sounds at all and nothing is registering withyou. Ignoring would be another way to describe thistype of listening. There is nothing wrong with passivelistening if its truly not important, but passivelistening - which we might more aptly call NotListening - is obviously daft and can be downrightdangerous if the communications are important
  8. 8. 2.Pretend Listening. 8You are not concentrating and will not rememberanything because you are actually daydreaming or beingdistracted by something else even though you willoccasionally nod or agree using stock safe replies. Thisis a common type of listening that grown-ups do withchildren. Pretend Listening reflects that there is anelement of deceit on the part of the listener towards thespeaker. You will generally know when you are PretendListening because the speaker will see that glazed look inyour eyes and say firmly something like, "Will you pleaseListen to me. Im talking to you!" Especially if thespeaker is a small child.
  9. 9. 3.Biased Listening or Projective Listening 9You are listening and taking in a certain amount ofinformation, but because you already have such firmopposing or different views, or a resistance to thespeaker, you are not allowing anything that is said orany noises made to influence your attitude and levelof knowledge and understanding. You are projectingyour position onto the speaker and the words. Youwould do this typically because you are underpressure or very defensive. You would normally beaware that you are doing this, which is a bigdifference between the next level and this one.
  10. 10. Misunderstood Listening 10 You have an interest and perhaps some flexibility in respect of the words spoken and your reactions to them, but because you are not thinking objectively and purely you are putting your own interpretation on what you are hearing - making the words fit what you expect or want them to fit. This is a type of projective listening like level three above, but you will not normally be aware that you are doing it until it is pointed out to you. This is a type of listening that is prone to big risks because if you are not made aware of your failings you will leave the discussion under a very wrong impression of the facts and the feelings of the other person. Its a deluded form of listening.Arrogant people like politicians and company directors who surround themselves with agreeable accomplices can fall into seriously ingrained habits of Misunderstood Listening.
  11. 11. Attentive Data-Only Listening 11 . Attentive Listening is a higher level of listening than Misunderstood Listening because it can gather reliable facts, but it fails to gather and suitably respond to emotions and feelings, and the situation of the other person, which is especially risky if the other persons position is potentially troublesome. This is a common form of listening among push and persuade sales people. Attentive Data-Only Listening is typically driven by a strong personal results motive. It can be highly manipulative and forceful. This type of listening wins battles and loses wars - i.e., it can achieve short-term gains, but tends to wreck chances of building anything constructive and sustainable.
  12. 12. Active Listening 12 This is listening to words, intonation, and observing body language and facial expressions, and giving feedback - but critically this type of listening is empty of two-way emotional involvement, or empathy. There is no transmitted sympathy or identification with the other persons feelings and emotional needs. This listening gathers facts and to a limited extent feelings too, but importantly the listener does not incorporate the feelings into reactions. This can be due to the listener being limited by policy or rules, or by personal insecurity, selfishness, or emotional immaturity. Active listening often includes a manipulative motive or tactics, which are certainly not present in the empathic level next and higher, and which is a simple way to differentiate between Active and Empathic listening.
  13. 13. Empathetic Listening 13 You are listening with full attention to the sounds, and all other relevant signals, including: tone of voice other verbal aspects - e.g., pace, volume, breathlessness, flow, style, emphasis facial expression body language feeling - not contained in a single sense - this requires you to have an overall collective appreciation through all relevant senses (taste is perhaps the only sense not employed here) of how the other person is feeling you able to see and feel the situation from the other persons position You are also reacting and giving feedback and checking understanding with the speaker. You will be summarising and probably taking notes and agreeing the notes too if its an important discussion. You will be honest in expressing disagreement but at the same time expressing genuine understanding, which hopefully (if your listening empathy is of a decent standard) will keep emotions civilized and emotionally under control even for very difficult discussions.
  14. 14. Facilitative Listening 14 This goes beyond even empathic listening because it implies and requires that you are able to extend an especially helpful approach to the other person or people. and to weigh the consequences of the other persons behaviour even if the other person cannot. In this respect you are acting rather like a protector or guardian, in the event that the other person is not being true to themselves. This does not mean that you are making decisions or recommendations for the other person - it means you are exercising caution on their behalf, which is vital if you are in a position of responsibility or influence towards them. Facilitative Listening also requires that you have thought and prepared very carefully about what you will ask and how you will respond, even if you pause to think and prepare your responses during the exchange. Many people do not give themselves adequate pause for thought when listening and responding at an empathic level. Facilitative listening contains a strong additional element of being interested in helping the other person see and understand their options and choices. Its a powerful thing. Facilitative Listening is not generally possible if the circumstances (for example organisational rules and policy, matters of law, emergency, etc) demand a faster resolution and offer little or no leeway for extending help. It is devoid of any selfish personal motive, other than to extend help, rather than achieve any sort of normal material gain. The other persons interests are at the forefront, which cannot truthfully be said of any of the preceding levels of listening. Facilitative Listening is not an age or money-related capability. It is an attitude of mind.
  15. 15. EMPATHIZE 15 WHILE YOU ARE LISTENING TO THE GUEST, PUT YOURSELF IN HIS OR HER PLACE. HOW WOULD YOU FEEL ABOUT THE SITUATION? HOW DO YOU IMAGINE THAT PERSON FEELS? WE NEED TO SHOW TO THE GUEST THAT WE UNDERSTAND HIS OR HER DISPLEASURE. LISTENING AND EMPATHY GO HAND-IN-HAND IN THAT THESE ARE THE IMPRESSIONS THE GUEST IS RECEIVING FROM US THAT WILL TELL HIM OR HER WHETHER OR NOT THEY ARE IMPORTANT TO US. LISTEN AND SHOW EMPATHY AS IF YOUR FRIEND HAD TOLD YOU A FAMILY MEMBER HAD DIED. THERE IS NO AGREE/DISAGREE OR JUDGEMENT INVOLVED AT THIS STAGE WHAT COULD WE DO IN A SITUATION WHERE THE COMPLAINT OR BAD EXPERIENCE WAS COMPLETELY OUTSIDE THE HOTEL (BAD EXPERIENCE WITH A TAXI, GUEST GOT ROBBED, ETC.)? WHAT OPPORTUNITIES PRESENT THEMSELVES FOR US TO TAKE CARE OF OUR GUESTS? REMEMBER…OUR GUESTS DON’T CARE HOW MUCH WE KNOW….UNTIL THEY KNOW HOW MUCH WE CARE!
  16. 16. HOW WE PHYSICALLY EXPRESS EMPATHY ( OR LACK OF) 16 EYE CONTACT (OR LACK OF) FACIAL GESTURES BODY LANGUAGE:NODDING AND SHAKING OF HEADOPEN BODY STANCE (EMPATHY)CLOSED BODY STANCE/FOLDED ARMS (APATHY)
  17. 17. APOLOGIZE 17WHAT (MOST) PEOPLE WANT TOBEGIN WITH IS RECOGNITION OF THEERROR OR WRONGDOING THEYSUFFERED. PERHAPS THEY WANTMORE, PERHAPS NOT. IN THE WORLDOF CUSTOMER/GUEST SERVICE,THERE ARE A COUPLE OF TYPES OFAPOLOGIES. THE FIRST ALWAYSOCCURS, WHILE DEPENDING ON THESITUATION, THE SECOND MAY ALSOOCCUR.
  18. 18. APOLOGY- PART 1 18 NOW THAT YOU HAVE LISTENED TO THE GUEST AND EMPATHIZED WITH THEIR DISSATISFACTION, IT IS TIME TO TAKE RESPONSIBILITY ON BEHALF OF THE HOTEL FOR WHAT WENT WRONG.1. KEEP THE APOLOGY BRIEF AND DIRECT.2. MENTION SPECIFICALLY WHAT YOU ARE APOLOGIZING ABOUT (WHY DOES THAT MATTER?! IT VALIDATES THE APOLOGY)3. LOOK AND SOUND SINCERE. BE SINCERE!4. REMEMBER THAT EMPATHY IS STILL PLAYING AN IMPORTANT ROLE IN THE PROCESS “FIRST OF ALL, MR JONES, I WANT TO BEGIN BY APOLOGIZING FOR THE PROBLEMS WITH THE AIR CONDITIONING LAST NIGHT. I KNOW WITH THIS HEAT, IT COULDN’T HAVE HAPPENED AT A WORSE TIME. I ALSO HAVE TROUBLE SLEEPING IN HOT WEATHER, SO I KNOW HOW YOU FEEL. PLEASE BE ASSURED THAT I WILL TALK TO MAINTENANCE TO MAKE SURE THIS GETS FIXED AND THAT IT DOESN’T HAPPEN AGAIN. PLEASE LET ME KNOW IF THERE IS ANYTHING ELSE I CAN DO FOR YOU.”
  19. 19. IMPORTANT: 19 YOU NEED TO REMEMBER THAT IN ALMOST EVERY CASE YOU DEAL WITH, IT ISN’T YOU PERSONALLY THAT THE GUEST IS ANGRY WITH, SO DON’T TAKE THINGS PERSONALLY. LIKEWISE, WHEN YOU APOLOGIZE, YOU’RE PROBABLY NOT ACCEPTING BLAME FOR SOMETHING YOU DID (OR FAILED TO DO) PERSONALLY. YOU ARE ACCEPTING RESPONSIBILITY FOR A FAILURE ON THE HOTEL’S PART AS A GROUP. ACCEPTING RESPONSIBILITY IS NOT A DEFEAT…IT IS PERHAPS THE MOST MATURE THING A HUMAN BEING CAN DO.
  20. 20. APOLOGY PART 2 20 “WHEN I MADE THE RESERVATIONS, I TOLD THE HOTEL THAT I HAD TO HAVE A MINI-FRIDGE IN THE ROOM FOR MY DAUGHTER’S MEDICINE. YOU GUYS TOLD ME THAT ALL THE ROOMS HAD FRIDGES. THE PROBLEM IS THAT OURS DIDN’T WORK AND THE MEDICINE WENT BAD. WE HAD TO GO TO THE AMERICAN HOSPITAL, SPEND THE HALF THE DAY THERE AND BUY MEDICINE. FORTUNATELY THEY HAD THE MEDICINE WE NEEDED AND IT DIDN’T EFFECT MY DAUGHTER”YOU: I APOLOGIZE FOR WHAT HAPPENED WITH YOUR DAUGHTER’S MEDICINE MR. JOHNSON, AND FOR HAVING TO WASTE VALUABLE VACATION TIME AT THE HOSPITAL. WHAT CAN I DO ON BEHALF OF PALLADIUM TO MAKE UP FOR THE SITUATION YOU HAD TO DEAL WITH? WHAT DO YOU FEEL WOULD BE FAIR?
  21. 21. WHAT’S FAIR (PERCEIVED VALUE) 21 WHAT IS PERCEIVED VALUE? IT IS THE VALUE THAT A GUEST PLACES ON THE PRODUCT OR SERVICE IN QUESTION AND CAN DIFFER FROM GUEST TO GUEST DEPENDING ON HOW IMPORTANT THEY VIEW THAT PRODUCT OR SERVICE. PERCEIVED VALUE IS ESPECIALLY IMPORTANT IN AN ALL- INCLUSIVE ENVIRONMENT WHERE THERE ARE NO INDIVIDUAL PRICES PLACED ON THESE SERVICES OR PRODUCTS AND THE HOTEL CANNOT SIMPLY REFUND THE VALUE. THERE NEEDS TO BE FLEXIBILITY, CREATIVITY, AND COMMUNICATION IF YOU WERE IN THIS GUEST’S POSITION, WHAT DO YOU THINK WOULD BE FAIR COMPENSATION? BEING IN GUEST SERVICES, WHAT WOULD YOU OFFER? PERHAPS EVEN THE GUEST DOESN’T KNOW WHAT WOULD BE FAIR.
  22. 22. GOING THE EXTRA MILE 22  “PLEASE LET ME KNOW IF THERE IS ANYTHING ELSE I CAN DO FOR YOU, MR JONES” USE THE GUEST’S LAST NAME WHILE HANDLING THEIR COMPLAINT. IT CONFIRMS THEIR STATUS AS SOMETHING MORE THAN A ROOM NUMBER. THE “IS THERE ANYTHING ELSE…” PHRASE OR QUESTION IS ONE OF, IF NOT THE MOST IMPORTANT THINGS YOU CAN SAY TO A GUEST IN A GUEST OR CUSTOMER SERVICE ENVIRONMENT, ALONG WITH “WELCOME TO____”.
  23. 23. BRAINSTORM 23 REFERRING BACK TO OUR LIST OF COMPLAINTS, CHOOSE ONE FROM EACH LEVEL AND FORM A RESPONSE AND RESOLUTION THAT A FRONTLINE STAFF COULD REFER TO IN DEALING WITH THE SITUATION IN A PRODUCTIVE MANNER RESULTING IN A “WIN- WIN” RESULT
  24. 24. RESPOND 24 REACH A TENTATIVE SOLUTION OR COMPENSATIONBE CLEAR WITH GUEST AS TO YOUR LEVEL OF AUTHORITY IN “MAKING IT HAPPEN”IF YOU HAVE THE AUTHORITY, ACT IMMEDIATELYIF YOU NEED TO DEFER TO A MANAGER OR SUPERVISOR, GIVE GUEST A TIMELINE AS TO WHEN HE OR SHE CAN EXPECT AN ANSWER, AND START PROCESS.YOU: MY MANAGER WENT TO EAT LUNCH. HE SHOULD RETURN IN ABOUT A HALF HOUR. AS SOON AS HE COMES BACK, I WILL TALK TO HIM ABOUT THIS SITUATION. WOULD IT BE OKAY FOR ME TO CONTACT YOU IN YOUR ROOM IN ABOUT AN HOUR?ABOVE ALL, KEEP YOUR WORD. DOING SO CREATES AND/OR RESTORES THE GUEST`S FAITH IN YOU AND THE HOTEL. FAILING TO KEEP YOUR WORD ACHIEVES EXACTLY THE OPPOSITE.
  25. 25. NOTIFY 25 YOU HAVE YOUR SOLUTION. MAYBE IT TOOK FIVE MINUTES OR MAYBE IT TOOK LONGER. YOU NEED TO LET THE GUEST KNOW RIGHT AWAY AS TO THE FINAL SOLUTION OR DECISION. DO NOT LEAVE HIM WAITING! APOLOGIZE FOR MAKING HIM WAIT IF THAT WAS NECESSARY. APOLOGIZE AGAIN FOR THE ORIGINAL SITUATION AND PRESENT THE SOLUTION OR COMPENSATION YOU (AND WHOEVER ELSE) HAVE DECIDED TO OFFER. YOU: I APOLOGIZE FOR MAKING YOU WAIT, MR JONES. AGAIN, PLEASE ACCEPT OUR APOLOGIES FOR {WHAT HAPPENED}. PALLADIUM WOULD LIKE TO OFFER YOU…..
  26. 26. THE ABUSIVE GUEST 26 DIVERT GUEST AWAY FROM THE DESK USE THE “INTERCEPT” TECHNIQUE AND DIVERT GUEST AWAY FROM OTHER EMPLOYEE IF IT LOOKS LIKE HE OR SHE NEEDS “SAVING” LET THEM KNOW YOU UNDERSTAND THEY ARE UPSET. YOU WOULD FEEL UPSET, TOO ASK GUEST IFYOU HAVE DONE SOMETHING PERSONALLY TO OFFEND HIM OR HER. KEEP YOUR VOICE LOW AND EVEN AND AVOID USING AGGRESSIVE BODY LANGUAGE LET THEM KNOW THAT IT IS NOT POSSIBLE TO ADDRESS THEIR COMPLAINT UNTIL THEY CHANGE THEIR BEHAVIOR “MR JONES, I UNDERSTAND THAT YOU ARE UPSET. I WANT TO HELP RESOLVE THIS PROBLEM BUT I NEED YOU TO CALM DOWN. I CANNOT HELP YOU IF YOU ARE SCREAMING AND YELLING AND I WILL NOT HELP YOU IF YOU CONTINUE TO MAKE ABUSIVE, PERSONAL REMARKS TO EITHER MYSELF OR ANYBODY ELSE. I`M OBLIGED TO WARN YOU, IN FACT, THAT IF YOU CONTINUE LIKE THIS, WE WILL CALL SECURITY. NOBODY HERE WANTS THINGS TO GET THAT FAR SO LET`S GO SIT DOWN OVER THERE AND TALK ABOUT THIS MORE CONSTRUCTIVELY. CAN I GET YOU SOMETHING TO DRINK, A SODA, WATER, OR COFFEE (OBVIOUSLY NOTHING ALCOHOLIC)?
  27. 27. BREATHE! USING DEEP BREATHING EXERCISES WILL HELP YOU KEEP YOUR COMPOSURE AND CALM DOWN YOUR BODY’S VITAL SIGNS
  28. 28. CONTROL YOURSELF, CONTROL THE SITUATION WHETHER IT’S AN ANGRY GUEST, A CO- WORKER YOU DON’T GET ALONG WITH, OR A MANAGER WHO YOU FEEL DOESN’T TREAT YOU FAIRLY, IT CAN HAVE ON EFFECT ON HOW YOU THINK AND FEEL ABOUT YOUR JOB AND HOW YOU HANDLE A DELICATE SITUATION. THE FOLLOWING ARE SOME TIPS AND THINGS TO BE AWARE OF…ABOUT YOURSELF!
  29. 29. ANALYZE, DON’T OBSESS IF YOU HAVE A BAD EXPERIENCE SUCH AS A VERY ANGRY GUEST, A DIS-AGREEMENT WITH A CO-WORKER, OR YOU GOT IN TROUBLE WITH YOUR SUPERVISOR, BE CAREFUL HOW YOU REACT. TAKE A FEW MINUTES TO ANALYZE THE SITUATION….THEN MOVE ON! OBSESSING OVER IT, AT LEAST WHILE YOU ARE STILL AT WORK, WILL ONLY PUT YOU IN A WORSE FRAME OF MIND AND VERY POSSIBLY HAVE AN EFFECT ON YOUR REMAINING INTERACTIONS WITH OTHER GUESTS OR CO-WORKERS.
  30. 30. EVICT THEM! DO YOU KEEP THINKING ABOUT THAT RUDE GUEST, THAT GOSSIPPY CO-WORKER, OR THAT UNFAIR SUPERVISOR? IN THAT CASE, THEY ARE RENTING SPACE IN YOUR HEAD LIKE YOU RENT A HOUSE OR AN APARTMENT. EXCEPT THEY ARE NOT GOOD TENANTS. THEY DON’T PAY RENT AND THEY CAUSE DAMAGE. DON’T LET THEM STAY. EVICT THEM! MAKE A MENTAL COMMITMENT TO YOURSELF NOT TO ALLOW THEM TO USE VALUABLE SPACE IN YOUR MIND. BEFORE ANYBODY ELSE DECIDES TO ENTER, MAKE SURE THEY PLAN TO USE YOUR SPACE ONLY IN A POSITIVE WAY. RENT THAT SPACE TO YOUR FAVORITE GUEST OR CO-WORKER. YOU WILL FEEL MUCH MORE POSITIVE ABOUT PEOPLE AND BE LESS LIKELY TO LOSE YOUR COOL.
  31. 31. D.A.S.H. A FOUR- STEP COPING TOOL CREATED BY PSYCHOLOGIST GAY LYNN WILLIAMSON WHO SPECIALIZES IN WORKPLACE PSYCHOLOGY AND DIRECTS MUCH OF HER EFFORTS TOWARDS THE HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY.
  32. 32. D-DEFUSE GET CONTROL OF YOURSELF FIRST AVOID PLACING BLAME..ON YOURSELF OR ANYONE ELSE PREPARE AN INNER DIALOGUE, A PEP TALK FOR DIFFICULT SITUATIONS DON’T APPEAR ANXIOUS-THE GUEST CAN TELL KEEP YOUR VOICE LOW AND CALM FOLLOW THE L.E.A.R.N. STEPS
  33. 33. THE PEP TALK (YOUR INNERVOICE TALKING)……“This guest is really upset right now. I know it is not about me, they are upset about a situation and taking it out on me. I am going to have to take some extra time to find out what is really going on. I am completely capable of handling this situation.”
  34. 34. A-ANALYZE WORK TO GAIN A FULL UNDERSTANDING OF THE SITUATION ENGAGE THE GUEST IN GETTING AS MUCH INFORMATION FROM THEM AS POSSIBLE. REALIZE THEY ARE UPSET AND INSECURE ABOUT THE SITUATION LISTEN, EMPATHIZE, APOLOGIZE,AND TAKE NOTES. SHOW THE GUEST YOU ARE COMMITTED TO GETTING THE INFORMATIONYOU NEED TO HELP THEM. LET THEM KNOW, IF NECEESSARY, THAT BEING ABUSIVE WILL NOT SERVE THE SITUATION DON’T TAKE IT PERSONAL!
  35. 35. S-SELF TALK REMIND YOURSELF THAT YOU ARE IN CONTROL COACH YOURSELF “KEEP YOUR VOICE IN CONTROL” GIVE YOUR SELF POSITIVE RE-ASSURANCE; ” I’M FULLY CAPABLE OF HANDLING THIS SITUATION” LIMIT YOUR CONVERSATION TO L.E.A.R.N. PROCESS AND INFORMATION GATHERING. OTHER THAN THAT, REMEMBER SILENCE IS GOLDEN. REMIND YOURSELF OF YOUR SELF-WORTH AND ENCOURAGE YOURSELF THROUGH THE SITUATION
  36. 36. H-HANDLE IT HANDLE THE SITUATION AND MOVE ON. ANALYZE WHAT YOU DID AND SAID THAT WORKED OR DIDN’T WORK. WHAT DID YOU LEARN? OK, NOW PUT IT IN THE PAST AND MOVE ON!
  37. 37. ROLE PLAYING 37 PICK A “LEVEL ONE” COMPLAINT. TAKE TURNS BEING THE GUEST AND G/S AGENT. FIRST, DO A BAD JOB. THEN DO THE BEST JOB POSSIBLE. AFTERWARDS, JUDGES WILL DO A 1-10 SCORING AND CRITIQUE. REPEAT THIS PROCESS FOR “LEVEL 2,3, AND 4 COMPLAINTS”

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