Meiosis and Gene Linkage<br />
PMAT<br />
Chromosome Number<br />Diploid<br />Homologous<br />Haploid<br />
Phases of Meiosis<br />Meiosis<br />By the end of meiosis II, the diploid cell that entered meiosis has become four haploi...
What Happens When It Goes Wrong?<br />
Meiosis I: Prophase<br />Tetrad<br />O		Crossing Over<br />
Meiosis I: Metaphase<br />Spindle fibers attach to the chromosomes<br />
Meiosis I: Anaphase<br />The fibers pull the homologous chromosomes toward opposite ends of the cell<br />
Meiosis I: Telophase and Cytokinesis<br />Nuclear membranes form.  The cell separates into two cells<br />These two cells ...
Meiosis II: Prophase<br />Unlike the first division, neither cell goes through a round of chromosome replication before en...
Meiosis II: Metaphase<br />Chromosomes line up in the center of each cell<br />
Meiosis II: Anaphase<br />The paired chromatids separate and move toward opposite ends of the cell<br />
Meiosis II: Telophase and Cytokinesis<br />Each cell separates into two cells - meaning four haploid cells all together<br />
Gamete Formation<br />In male animals, meiosis produces four <br />	haploid sperm cells<br />			   However, the cell divis...
Mitosis vs. Meiosis<br />
Gene Linkage<br />It is the <br />chromosomes that <br />assort <br />independently, not <br />the individual genes<br />M...
Gene Maps<br />
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Lecture nine

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Meiosis

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Lecture nine

  1. 1. Meiosis and Gene Linkage<br />
  2. 2. PMAT<br />
  3. 3. Chromosome Number<br />Diploid<br />Homologous<br />Haploid<br />
  4. 4. Phases of Meiosis<br />Meiosis<br />By the end of meiosis II, the diploid cell that entered meiosis has become four haploid cells<br />
  5. 5. What Happens When It Goes Wrong?<br />
  6. 6. Meiosis I: Prophase<br />Tetrad<br />O Crossing Over<br />
  7. 7. Meiosis I: Metaphase<br />Spindle fibers attach to the chromosomes<br />
  8. 8. Meiosis I: Anaphase<br />The fibers pull the homologous chromosomes toward opposite ends of the cell<br />
  9. 9. Meiosis I: Telophase and Cytokinesis<br />Nuclear membranes form. The cell separates into two cells<br />These two cells enter Meiosis II<br />
  10. 10. Meiosis II: Prophase<br />Unlike the first division, neither cell goes through a round of chromosome replication before entering meiosis II<br />Each of the cell’s chromosomes has 2 chromatids<br />
  11. 11. Meiosis II: Metaphase<br />Chromosomes line up in the center of each cell<br />
  12. 12. Meiosis II: Anaphase<br />The paired chromatids separate and move toward opposite ends of the cell<br />
  13. 13. Meiosis II: Telophase and Cytokinesis<br />Each cell separates into two cells - meaning four haploid cells all together<br />
  14. 14.
  15. 15. Gamete Formation<br />In male animals, meiosis produces four <br /> haploid sperm cells<br /> However, the cell divisions at the end of meiosis are uneven in females, so that only a single cell receives most of the cytoplasm<br />
  16. 16. Mitosis vs. Meiosis<br />
  17. 17. Gene Linkage<br />It is the <br />chromosomes that <br />assort <br />independently, not <br />the individual genes<br />Mendel did not discover gene linkage (Morgan did)<br />
  18. 18. Gene Maps<br />

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