Fabaceae (2) (Caesal)

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Fabaceae (2) (Caesal)

  1. 1. Fabaceae<br />Caesalpinioideae<br />
  2. 2. Fabaceae(Leguminosae) — Bean/Pea family (after faba, Latin name for broad bean). 643 genera / 18,000 species.<br />
  3. 3. The Fabaceae consist of herbs, shrubs, trees, or vines, with spines sometimes present<br />The leaves are usually compound (pinnate, bipinnate, trifoliolate, rarely palmate), sometimes simple or unifoliolate, usually spiral, basal pulvini often present, sometimes functioning in tactile ( thigmonastic ), leaflet folding responses (e.g., Mimosaspp.), generally stipulate, sometimes stipellate, stipules spinose in some. <br />The inflorescence is variable, typically bracteate.<br />The flowers are usually bisexual, sometimes unisexual, actinomorphicor zygomorphic, pedicellate or sessile, hypogynous or perigynous. <br />The perianth is biseriate, dichlamydeous, with a hypanthium sometimes present. <br />
  4. 4. The calyx is aposepalousor synsepalous with 5 [3 6] sepals. <br />The corolla is apopetalous or sympetalous, with 5 [rarely 0] valvate or imbricate petals.<br />The stamens are 5 or 10 ∞, distinct or connate.<br />Anthers are longitudinal, rarely poricidalin dehiscence. The gynoecium is unicarpellous, with a superior ovary, 1 [rarely 2 or more in some Mimosoideae] carpel, and 1 locule.<br />The style and stigma are solitary.<br />Placentationis marginal; ovules are anatropous or campylotropous, bitegmic, 2 ∞ [1] per carpel. Nectaries are often present as a ring at the base of the ovary. <br />The fruit is generally a legume, sometimes indehiscent (e.g., Arachis, peanut), winged (a samara), drupelike, or divided into transverse partitions (a loment).<br />
  5. 5. The Caesalpinioideae are distinctive in having generally zygomorphicflowers with usually 5 or 10 [1 ∞] distinct stamens (staminodes present in some) and a corolla (imbricate in bud) with typically five distinct petals (sometime reduced or lacking), the posterior, median petal inner to (overlapped by) the two lateral petals.<br />
  6. 6. A.Amorphafruticosa, Whole plant.<br />B. Amorphafruticosa, Close-up of owers of spike.<br />
  7. 7. C. Bauhinia variegata. <br />Note medial posterior petal inner to laterals and distinct stamens. <br />D. Caesalpiniaspinosa. Note unusual pectinate anterior sepal. <br />
  8. 8. E. Cassia didymobotrya, with heteromorphic (trimorphic) stamens. <br />.<br />F. Sennaarmata, a desert species<br />
  9. 9. Reference/s:<br />Plant Systematics by Michael G. Simpson <br />
  10. 10. Thanks for listening! <br />Group 5 <br />

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