3.20.12 ed trust successful schools

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Short version of EdTrust presentation highlighting successful schools.

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  • Shows the percentage of students graduating on time with a Regents diploma, a local diploma, or a Regents diploma with advanced designationLocal diploma: passed 5 Regents exams with a score of 55 or aboveRegents diploma: passed 5 Regents with a score of 65 or aboveRegents exam with advanced designation: earned 22 units of course credit; passed 7-9 Regents exams at a score of 65 or above; and took advanced course sequences in CTE, the arts, or a language other than English.
  • 3.20.12 ed trust successful schools

    1. 1. ACHIEVEMENT IN AMERICA: A Fast Briefing on Trends and Patterns…and Their Implications for Our Collective FutureNational Defense UniversityWashington, DC March, 2012 © 2012 THE EDUCATION TRUST
    2. 2. What We Hear Many Educators Say: • They’re poor • Their parents don’t care • They come to schools without breakfast • Not enough books • Not enough parentsSource: N/A © 2012 THE EDUCATION TRUST
    3. 3. But if they are right, why are low- income students and students ofcolor performing so much higher in some schools… © 2012 THE EDUCATION TRUST © 2012 THE EDUCATION TRUST
    4. 4. George Hall Elementary School Mobile, AL • 530 Students • 100% African American • 99% Low-IncomeSource: Alabama Department of Education © 2012 THE EDUCATION TRUST
    5. 5. Four years ago, school was lowestperforming in the district and amongthe bottom few in the state. District reconstituted—and restaffed. © 2012 THE EDUCATION TRUST © 2012 THE EDUCATION TRUST
    6. 6. George Hall Elementary, Grade 5 Math 2008 96.5 100 Level IV 80 59.1 60 53.2 40 20 0Source: Public Affairs Research Council of Alabama, “Does the System succeed with All Kinds of Kids. © 2012 THE EDUCATION TRUST
    7. 7. George Hall Elementary, Grade 5 Reading 2008 61.4 62 Level IV 60 58 56 54.7 54 53.5 52 50 48Source: Public Affairs Research Council of Alabama, “Does the System Succeed with All Kinds of Kids.” © 2012 THE EDUCATION TRUST
    8. 8. Halle Hewetson Elementary School Las Vegas, NV • 962 students in grades PK – 5 – 85% Latino – 7% African American • 100% Low Income • 71% Limited English ProficientNote: Data are for 2010-2011 school yearSource: Nevada Department of Education © 2011 THE EDUCATION TRUST © 2012 THE EDUCATION TRUST
    9. 9. Big Improvement at Halle Hewetson Elementary Latino Students – Grade 3 Reading 100% Percentage Meets Standards and Above 80% 78% 60% 50% Hewetson 40% Nevada 26% 20% 7% 0% 2004 2010Source: Nevada Department of Education © 2011 THE EDUCATION TRUST © 2012 THE EDUCATION TRUST
    10. 10. High Performance Across Groups at Halle Hewetson Elementary Grade 3 Math (2011) 100% 95% 95% 91% 91% Percentage Meets Standards or Advanced 80% 69% 63% 61% 61% 60% Halle Hewetson 40% Nevada 20% 0% All Latino Low Income Limited English ProficientSource: Nevada Department of Education © 2011 THE EDUCATION TRUST © 2012 THE EDUCATION TRUST
    11. 11. Exceeding Standards at Halle Hewetson Elementary Low-Income Students – Grade 3 Math (2011) 100% 29% 80% Percentage of Students 63% 60% Exceeds Standards 33% Meets Standards 40% Approaches Standards Emergent/Developing 28% 25% 20% 6% 14% 0% 4% Halle Hewetson NevadaSource: Nevada Department of Education © 2011 THE EDUCATION TRUST © 2012 THE EDUCATION TRUST
    12. 12. Halle Hewetson Elementary School © 2011 THE EDUCATION TRUST © 2012 THE EDUCATION TRUST
    13. 13. Elmont Memorial Junior-Senior High Elmont, New York• 1,895 students in grades 7-12 – 77% African American – 13% Latino• 25% Low-IncomeSource: New York Department of Education © 2012 THE EDUCATION TRUST
    14. 14. Outperforming the State at Elmont Secondary-Level English (2010) 100% 95% 96% 93% Percentage Meeting Standards or Above 90% 79% 80% 73% 70% 67% 60% 50% Elmont 40% New York 30% 20% 10% 0% All Students African American Low-Income Students StudentsSource: New York State Department of Education © 2012 THE EDUCATION TRUST
    15. 15. Improvement and High Performance at Elmont Memorial Junior-Senior High African-American Students – Secondary-Level Math 100% 96% 96% 93% 93% 93% Percentage Meeting Standards or Above 90% 85% 80% 70% 64% 57% 61% 60% 51% 55% 50% 46% Elmont 40% New York 30% 20% 10% 0% 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010Source: New York State Department of Education © 2012 THE EDUCATION TRUST
    16. 16. High Graduation Rates at Elmont Memorial High School Class of 2010 98% 99% 100% 96% 95% Percentage of 2006 Freshmen Graduating in 89% 90% 80% 80% 73% 70% 64% 60% 58% 57% Four Years 50% 40% Elmont 30% New York 20% 10% 0% Overall African Latino Economically Not American Disadvantaged Economically DisadvantagedSource: New York State Department of Education © 2012 THE EDUCATION TRUST
    17. 17. Available at Harvard Education Press (www.hepg.org) or Amazon.comSource: © 2012 THE EDUCATION TRUST
    18. 18. Very big differences at district level,too—even in the performance of the “same” group of students. © 2012 THE EDUCATION TRUST
    19. 19. Low-Income African American Students do Better in Some Districts (NAEP Reading 4th 2003) 210 200 190 180 District of Los Atlanta Chicago Cleveland National San Charlotte Houston New York Boston Columbia Angeles Public Diego City * There is a 19 point gap between Poor African American 4th graders in the District of Columbia and Boston (roughly equivalent to 2 years’ worth of learning)SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, National Center for Education Statistics, National Assessment of EducationalProgress (NAEP), 2003 Trial Urban District Reading Assessment. © 2012 THE EDUCATION TRUST
    20. 20. Low-Income African American Students do Better in Some Districts (NAEP Math 8th 2003) 255 245 235 225 Los District of Atlanta Chicago National San Cleveland Boston Charlotte New York Houston Angeles Columbia Public Diego City * There is a 28 point gap between Poor African American 8th graders in Los Angeles and Houston (roughly equivalent to 3 years’ worth of learning)SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, National Center for Education Statistics, National Assessment of EducationalProgress (NAEP), 2003 Trial Urban District Reading Assessment. © 2012 THE EDUCATION TRUST
    21. 21. Bottom Line:At Every Level of Education, What We Do Matters! © 2012 THE EDUCATION TRUST
    22. 22. Download this presentation. www.edtrust.org Washington, D.C. Royal Oak, MI Oakland, CA 202/293-1217 734/619-8009 510/465-6444 © 2012 THE EDUCATION TRUST

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