Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Native American Music PowerPoint
Native American Music PowerPoint
Native American Music PowerPoint
Native American Music PowerPoint
Native American Music PowerPoint
Native American Music PowerPoint
Native American Music PowerPoint
Native American Music PowerPoint
Native American Music PowerPoint
Native American Music PowerPoint
Native American Music PowerPoint
Native American Music PowerPoint
Native American Music PowerPoint
Native American Music PowerPoint
Native American Music PowerPoint
Native American Music PowerPoint
Native American Music PowerPoint
Native American Music PowerPoint
Native American Music PowerPoint
Native American Music PowerPoint
Native American Music PowerPoint
Native American Music PowerPoint
Native American Music PowerPoint
Native American Music PowerPoint
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Native American Music PowerPoint

1,073

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,073
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
24
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • Both of these groups are closely related, but Pueblo: increased length and number of scale tones (hexatonic and heptatonic common), variety of form, melodic contour, and percussive accompaniment, ranges between an octave and a twelfth, with rhythmic complexity equal to the Plains sub-area Athabaskan: tetratonic, tritonic, and pentatonic scales
  • Transcript

    • 1. INDIGENOUS SOUNDS NATIVE AMERICAN MUSIC
    • 2. WHAT IS NATIVE AMERICAN MUSIC? • Music used, created, and/or performed by Native Americans. • Agree or disagree? • Native American Music more specifically refers to “tribal” music. • Tribal, inter-tribal, and pan-tribal or pan-Indian • Role in Society • Ceremony, religion, recreation, work, dance, education, storytelling
    • 3. COMMONALITIES • Almost always functional • Rarely an independent concept • Heavy emphasis on voice and percussion • Use of vocables • Almost always unison singing / no harmony • Often repetitive • Phrase often goes from high to low
    • 4. SOUTHWEST • Arizona, New Mexico, most of Texas • Common Instrumentation: voice, percussion, and simple aerophones • Two groupings: • Pueblo • Includes Hopi, Zuni, Taos Pueblo, San Ildefonso Pueblo, Santo Domingo Pueblo, and many others • The most complex indigenous musical style • Vocals relaxed and lower in pitch • Ex: San Ildefonso Eagle Dance, Taos Moonlight Song • Athabaskan • Includes Apache and Navajo • Vocals often tense, pulsing, nasal, and frequently use falsetto • Ex: Navajo Silversmith Song, Navajo Night Chant
    • 5. SOUTHWESTERN INSTRUMENTS • Percussion • Drums • Rattles • Gourds • Turtle Shell • Copper / Clay Bells • Wind Instruments • Whistles • Wooden Flutes • Shell Trumpets • String Instruments • “Apache Fiddle” • (Tsii’edo’a’tl: meaning “wood that sings”)
    • 6. EX: APACHE FIDDLE MELODY APACHE FIDDLE
    • 7. CLAY BELL
    • 8. ZUNI HAND DRUM EX: ZUNI RAIN DANCE
    • 9. EX: NAVAJO NIGHT CHANT TURTLE SHELL RATTLE
    • 10. EASTERN WOODLANDS / SOUTHEAST
    • 11. SOUTHEASTERN INSTRUMENTS Flutes and Whistles • Almost always a solo instrument Percussion • Wide variety of drums and rattles
    • 12. NATIVE AMERICAN FLUTE
    • 13. EX: CHEROKEE MORNING SONG, SIOUX LOVE SONG FLUTE DIAGRAM
    • 14. PLAINS • Midwest (and into Canada), northern Texas • Sioux, Blackfoot, Crow, Dakota, Cheyenne, Comanche • Arapaho and Cheyenne: Typically nasal, high pitched, falsetto, extreme vocal tension, pulsation; increased use of tetratonic scale • Ex: Arapaho Sun Dance Song • Large double-sided skin drums are characteristic of the Plains tribes • Ex: Blackfoot Owl Dance
    • 15. EX: BLACKFOOT OWL DANCE PLAINS STYLE DOUBLE-SIDED DRUM
    • 16. GREAT BASIN • Utah (desert), Nevada, southern Oregon • Extremely simple music • Ditonic / Tritonic / Tetratonic • Typically contains fewer pitches than other regions • The Klamath and Modoc tribes frequently have ditonic and tritonic songs • Ex: Ute Sun Dance • Repeated phrases • AA BB CC • Sometimes only one repeated phrase • Ex: Peiute Ceremonial Song
    • 17. ARCTIC • Alaska, NW Territories, Yukon Territory, Greenland • Melodies are often simple and repetitive • Simple instruments: tambourine-like hand drum, rattles • Known for throat singing • Tanya Tagaq “Description of Throat Singing” • http://youtu.be/Phr1HVwrjlQ • Tanya Tagaq “The Sounds of Arctic Throat Singing” • http://youtu.be/KNb2ZDjeiU4 • Traditional Arctic Throat Singing • http://youtu.be/t8QuNdfb-Yw
    • 18. FRANCES DENSMORE • 1867 – 1957 • Classically trained pianist • Interested in preserving the music and culture of Native Americans • Research and Gender • Smithsonian • Wax cylinder recordings • http://youtu.be/m1XT-tul9f4
    • 19. CONTEMPORARY NATIVE AMERICAN MUSIC • Often blends “traditional” music with “popular” music • Example 1: Medicine Dream “In This World” • http://youtu.be/BBlzAXobSvY • Example 2: “Yeha-Noha” (“Wishes of Happiness and Prosperity”) • http://youtu.be/XPd9be8R5bA

    ×