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EUROPEAN FOOD INNOVATION AND TECHNOLOGY                                                       FINAL TRIP REPORT           ...
Contents 1. 	   Introduction                                                                                              ...
Executive SummaryKia ora, §      There are countless opportunities for Maori businesses, Trusts and Incorporations with f...
1. IntroductionGrowing global need for food. 1The global population continues to increase and has just passed the seven bi...
§   Institute of Food Research, Norwich, (UK);2. European trip plan                                                      ...
§   Prof. David Cameron-Smith, University of Auckland             (Liggins Institute);        §   Prof. Indrawati Oey, U...
Nevertheless, key trade sectors remain vulnerable to weak external3. New Zealand economic profile                         ...
Projecting these growth rate’s forward over the next 10 and 204. The Maori economy                                        ...
markedly, under-performing compared to similar enterprisebenchmarks. There is approximately 600 000 hectares of such lands...
Figure 5: Growing New Zealand’s Innovation Investment5. Government Innovation and Trade   Reform linkagesAccording to gove...
To meet the target of 40% by 2025,                                      markets and that that their cost of financing is s...
annual government investment delivering meaningful and realoutcomes for Maori. Callaghan Innovation is an attempt bygovern...
6.1     United Kingdom6. United Kingdom – European   Profile                                                          The ...
standards, producing about 60% of food needs with less                 The German economy - the fifth largest economy in t...
Switzerlands economy benefits from a highly developedservice sector, led by financial services, and amanufacturing industr...
§   Western European economies have highly advanced              capabilities in food production and agriculture relative...
Our science strategy aims to understand the working of the7. Institute of Food Research                                   ...
Leatherhead has a unique mix of food safety expertise, information8. Leatherhead Institute (Surrey,                       ...
9. Wageningen Institute – The                                          The strength of Wageningen UR lies in its ability t...
Institute for Marine Resources & Ecosystem Studies                                                                        ...
10. German Institute of Food                                             Briefly the Institutes focus is on:   Technologie...
Shockwaves with the required energy density can be generated by         The shelf life of marinated poultry meat, for exam...
ETH Zurich helps to find long-term solutions to global challenges.11. Swiss Federal Institute of                          ...
12. Festel Capital - Switzerland                                             Festel Capital partners have expressed a very...
student completions and the highest level of research income.13. New Zealand Universities, Crown                          ...
Some of the relevant academic and research specialisation’s                     §   Future Foods;relevant to Maori and fo...
Lincoln University is home to:         §   The Agribusiness and Economics Research Unit                13.5    Plant and ...
§   Food Innovation                                                  §   ensure that New Zealand’s pastoral sector is ab...
14. Conclusions and Opportunities for Maori business enabled by European    Food Innovation and Technologies14.1       Key...
15. Now then.., how to make this all happen (and quickly)15.1    Phase 1: Information sharing across Maori business   •   ...
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European Food Innovation and Technology Report 2013

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There are countless opportunities for Maori businesses, Trusts and Incorporations with food producing assets like land, cropping, agriculture, horticulture, viticulture, fishing and other marine interests to add value to these assets through direct accessing of leading European technologies and capabilities and applying these here at home.

It is clear from visiting the leading Food Technology Institutes across Europe that post-war, many of these economies not surprisingly have sophisticated industrial technologies that pervade and enable much of their economic development today.

The Institutes we visited are engaged by the largest food companies of the world (i.e. Nestle, Unilever, Bayer and others) to undertake much of their new product development across all food categories. It is clear that what is happening in the laboratories of these Institutes will shape world consumer demand in the food sector out into the future.
Europe has to be an important source of new technologies to enable Maori busineses to succeed on the world stage. But, it is likely that the major markets for products from our businesses enabled by european technologies will be in the emerging markets of China, India and South America. Traditional markets like the UK, Europe, US and Australia will likely start to feature less in time.

The strategy for Maori food business therefore must be to seek and exploit the best food technologies of the world (and definitely from Europe) and transfer these technologies directly across our businesses and particularly across the estimated 1.2 million hectares of underperforming Maori lands. This is a relatively low risk but high return strategy and can happen quickly compared to the much more risky, time consuming and very expensive strategy of doing new research and science from scratch.

Changes being made by government in terms of some of their reforms may enable Maori business to make this step but, it is unlikely that these changes will bear any real fruit for 3 to 5 years (or more) for Maori business. We shouldn’t wait for government (or any one else) to take this leadership role. The leadership must come from Maori directly, with Government, researchers and others playing a more supporting and enabling role.

An overarching strategy will be in time to move away from passive leasing out of strategic assets like land, fish quota et al towards creating new and wholly Maori owned value chains from raw materials through to end consumer. An important feature of these new value chains will be to bring together multiple Maori businesses (separate Trusts) enabled by the worlds best technology and innovations.

Finally, we can not afford to sit around and do nothing! The opportunity cost (of doing nothing) will be hundreds of millions of dollars to our collective whanau, hapu and Iwi. However, the inverse of this if done well is, the Maori economy could grow to equal the size of the non-Maori economy in as little as10 years.

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Transcript of "European Food Innovation and Technology Report 2013"

  1. 1. EUROPEAN FOOD INNOVATION AND TECHNOLOGY FINAL TRIP REPORT Implications and Opportunities for Maori Business To: Iwi Leaders Maori Business Leaders Maori Trusts and Incorporations He whakatauki (a Maori proverb) “Te manu e kai ana i te miro, mona te ngahere” (The bird that eats the fruit of the Miro, his is the forest) “Te manu i kai ana i te matauranga, mona te ao” (The bird that eats the knowledge, his is the world) March 2013 Mr. Chris Karamea Insley Owner and Managing DirectorPrivate l& Confidential 1
  2. 2. Contents 1.   Introduction 4   2.   European trip plan 5   3.   New Zealand economic profile 7   4.   The Maori economy 8   5.   Government Innovation and Trade Reform linkages 10   6.   United Kingdom – European Profile 13   7.   Institute of Food Research (Norwich, London) 17   8.   Leatherhead Institute (Surrey, London) 18   9.   Wageningen Institute – The Netherlands 19   10.   German Institute of Food Technologies - Germany 21   11.   Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH Zurich) - Switzerland 23   12.   Festel Capital - Switzerland 24   13.   New Zealand Universities, Crown Research Institute’s and local opportunities for collaboration 25   14.   Conclusions and Opportunities for Maori business enabled by European Food Innovation and Technologies 29   15.   Now then.., how to make this all happen (and quickly) 30   Private & Confidential 2
  3. 3. Executive SummaryKia ora, § There are countless opportunities for Maori businesses, Trusts and Incorporations with food producing assets like land, cropping, agriculture, horticulture, viticulture, fishing and other marine interests to add value to these assets through direct accessing of leading European technologies and capabilities and applying these here at home. § It is clear from visiting the leading Food Technology Institutes across Europe that post-war, many of these economies not surprisingly have sophisticated industrial technologies that pervade and enable much of their economic development today. § The Institutes we visited are engaged by the largest food companies of the world (i.e. Nestle, Unilever, Bayer and others) to undertake much of their new product development across all food categories. It is clear that what is happening in the laboratories of these Institutes will shape world consumer demand in the food sector out into the future. § Europe has to be an important source of new technologies to enable Maori busineses to succeed on the world stage. But, it is likely that the major markets for products from our businesses enabled by european technologies will be in the emerging markets of China, India and South America. Traditional markets like the UK, Europe, US and Australia will likely start to feature less in time. § The strategy for Maori food business therefore must be to seek and exploit the best food technologies of the world (and definitely from Europe) and transfer these technologies directly across our businesses and particularly across the estimated 1.2 million hectares of underperforming Maori lands. This is a relatively low risk but high return strategy and can happen quickly compared to the much more risky, time consuming and very expensive strategy of doing new research and science from scratch. § Changes being made by government in terms of some of their reforms may enable Maori business to make this step but, it is unlikely that these changes will bear any real fruit for 3 to 5 years (or more) for Maori business. We shouldn’t wait for government (or any one else) to take this leadership role. The leadership must come from Maori directly, with Government, researchers and others playing a more supporting and enabling role. § An overarching strategy will be in time to move away from passive leasing out of strategic assets like land, fish quota et al towards creating new and wholly Maori owned value chains from raw materials through to end consumer. An important feature of these new value chains will be to bring together multiple Maori businesses (separate Trusts) enabled by the worlds best technology and innovations. § Finally, we can not afford to sit around and do nothing! The opportunity cost (of doing nothing) will be hundreds of millions of dollars to our collective whanau, hapu and Iwi. However, the inverse of this if done well is, the Maori economy could grow to equal the size of the non-Maori economy in as little as10 years. Private & Confidential 3
  4. 4. 1. IntroductionGrowing global need for food. 1The global population continues to increase and has just passed the seven billion people mark. At the same time, the rising middle class in Asia hasincreasing disposable income leading to increasing demand for premium, high quality food and beverage. The world needs to significantly increasefood production and New Zealand can play a part in that process.New Zealand is currently low intensityWhile New Zealand’s exports of food and beverage (F&B) are significant, these account for just 2.5% of global trade in food. The country hasconsiderable untapped capacity to export more. New Zealand is a country the size of Italy or the United Kingdom, but with the population ofSingapore. However Italy feeds a domestic population of 60 million people and exports twice as much F&B as New Zealand.The New Zealand Government has set a target of tripling the country’s food and beverage exports over the next 15 years. This will be achievedthrough both growth of existing major sectors and the newer emerging growth stars. Maori are a large and rapidly growing part of the New Zealandeconomy and F&B sector. This is discussed further in this report.Learn from peersThere is nothing unique with the problems facing New Zealand, other countries have had very similar pressures. The experience of high relevantglobal peers (e.g. Denmark, Ireland, Oregon) strongly suggests intensification will continue going forward and that strong increases in production arepossible. These peers clearly have strong lessons available for New Zealand.This was a fundamental driver of the visit to the leading science and technology institutions in Europe i.e. to find valuable lessons, technologies, andpartnerships and engage these into the Maori economy.1 Coriolis (2011). Food and Beverage Information Project 2011.Industry Snapshot. Private & Confidential 4
  5. 5. § Institute of Food Research, Norwich, (UK);2. European trip plan § Leatherhead Food Research Institute, Surrey, (UK); § Wageningen University, The Netherlands; § German Institute of Food Technologies, Germany;2.1 My primary trip objectives: § Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH Zurich), Switzerland; and § Assess technology development in leading European § Seftal Capital Limited, Switzerland. institutes for relevance to the needs of the Maori economy (food and medicinal); 2.4 Members of the New Zealand delegation § With particular emphasis on the opportunity for immediate to medium term technology transfer; § Connect Iwi and Maori business with world leading Figure 1: Group photo in Germany (Max standing on the rock) technology and innovation players; and § Assess and develop connections into European markets for Maori products.2.2 My secondary trip objectives: § Establish and form technology and innovation strategic connections and alliances with Europe; § Explore opportunities for more strategic joint research; and § Assess potential for European commercial co- investment with Maori. Research (Universities and CRI’s)2.3 European Food Institutions visited § Dr. Catherine, Kingston, Plant & Food Research; § Dr. James David Morton, Lincoln University;The following are the institutions visted by the New Zealand § Dr. Rodrigo Bibiloni, AgResearch;delegation: § Dr. Susan Meade, Bimolecular Interaction Centre; § Ms. Lynley Browne, Auckland Uni-Services; § Prof. Claire Massey, Massey University;Private l& Confidential 5
  6. 6. § Prof. David Cameron-Smith, University of Auckland (Liggins Institute); § Prof. Indrawati Oey, University of Otago; § Prof. John Brooks, Auckland University of Technology; and § Prof. Mohammed Farid, The University of Auckland.Business § Mr. Peter Lehrke New Image Group; § Ms. Sarah Lochrie, Comvita; § Dr. Shantanu Das, Goodman Fielder New Zealand; § Dr. Andrew Sansom, Seperex Nutritionals; and § Mr. Richard McColl, Ovine Automation Limited.Maori business § Mr. Chris Karamea Insley, 37 Degrees South Limited.Government § Dr. Max Kennedy, Ministry of Business, Innovation & Employment; and § Mr. Bruce McCallum, Ministry of Business, Innovation & Employment. Private & Confidential 6
  7. 7. Nevertheless, key trade sectors remain vulnerable to weak external3. New Zealand economic profile demand. The government plans to raise productivity growth and develop infrastructure, while reining in government spending.3.1 New Zealand economyOver the past 20 years the government has transformed NewZealand from an agrarian economy dependent on concessionaryBritish market access to a more industrialized, free market economythat can compete globally. This dynamic growth has boosted realincomes - but left behind some at the bottom of the ladder - andbroadened and deepened the technological capabilities of theindustrial sector. Per capita income rose for ten consecutive yearsuntil 2007 in purchasing power parity terms, but fell in 2008-09.Debt-driven consumer spending drove robust growth in the first halfof the decade, helping fuel a large balance of payments deficit thatposed a challenge for economic managers. Inflationary pressurescaused the central bank to raise its key rate steadily from January2004 until it was among the highest in the OECD in 2007-08;international capital inflows attracted to the high rates furtherstrengthened the currency and housing market, however,aggravating the current account deficit.The economy fell into recession before the start of the globalfinancial crisis and contracted for five consecutive quarters in2008-09. In line with global peers, the central bank cut interestrates aggressively and the government developed fiscal stimulusmeasures. The economy posted a 2% decline in 2009, but pulled outof recession late in the year, and achieved 1.7% growth in 2010 and2% in 2011. Figure 2: D utch G reen-house (cut f lowers ) Private & Confidential 7
  8. 8. Projecting these growth rate’s forward over the next 10 and 204. The Maori economy years is given in Figure 4 below.The Maori economy is growing rapidly. Not only is it growing rapidly, Figure 4: Forecast relative GDP growth rateit is becoming much more diversified away from traditional primarysector assets (agriculture, fishing, forestry).Figure 3: Profile of the Maori economy 2 The use of technology and innovation by Maori business will be fundamental to achieving this growth through lifting the productivity of Maori owned assets. 4.1 Current Maori AgribusinessRealtive to the non-Maori economy, for the period 2001 to 2010, theMaori economy has grown at a rate 16.4 percent compound annual There is currently around 1.2 million hectares of Maori freehold landgrowth rate, relative to the non-Maori economy that has grown at a that is either under-performing, under-utilised, or both.3meagre 3.7 percent. Under-performing landholdings can be described as those that are currently developed for productive use but which are clearly, often2 3 BERL (2010) Maori Agribusiness. (March, 2011). A study of Maori Freehold Land Resource. Private & Confidential 8
  9. 9. markedly, under-performing compared to similar enterprisebenchmarks. There is approximately 600 000 hectares of such lands.Under-utilized landholdings represent a complex mix ofcircumstances and conditions – there is an amalgam of situationsthat contribute to this land being under-utilized. The drivers ofunderutilization range from the inherent physical production of theland not being realized, constraints on the physical capacity of theland itself through a lack of identifiable owners or managemententities. There is also an under-contribution to the financialwellbeing of the ownership group.There is an estimated further 600 000 hectares of such lands. Private & Confidential 9
  10. 10. Figure 5: Growing New Zealand’s Innovation Investment5. Government Innovation and Trade Reform linkagesAccording to government, there are two ways to grow an economy4. § The first is to increase the quantity of inputs that go into production – capital and labour. § The second is discovering and applying new ways to produce more with the same quantity of inputs – this is innovation. Innovation is the introduction of a new or significantly improved product, process or method. Innovation increases the productivity of firms and the whole economy and creates sustainable long-term 5.1 Link to government global trade strategy GDP per capita growth. To help drive progress in the Building Export Markets work and to measure success, the Government has committed to the following high-level goal:New Zealand has a strong primary sector. Seventy percent of our Increase the ratio of exports to GDP to 40% by 2025 5goods exports by value are primary products, about half of whichare unprocessed. A significant proportion of export growth in the This is an ambitious target. Currently our total exports of goods andlast eight years has come from primary products. As Maori, we need services are $61 billion, 30% of GDP1. If our exports were 40% ofto build on this strength by innovating and moving up the value GDP today, that would mean they would be $20 billion larger – whichchain, and also take advantage of our strength in agricultural is more than 50% larger than our current dairy exports ($12 billion)technologies. or a further 200 knowledge intensive manufacturing or services companies each earning $100 million per year.4 5 The Business Growth Agenda (August, 2011). Building Innovation. The Business Growth Agenda (August, 2011). Global Trade Private & Confidential 10
  11. 11. To meet the target of 40% by 2025, markets and that that their cost of financing is similar to offshore competition.The value of New Zealand exports will need to double in real terms.This requires real export growth on average of between 5.5% and7.5% a year from 2016 to 2025 (depending on the path of economic 5.2 Callaghan Innovation and Maori interestsgrowth and using Treasury’s export growth forecasts for the nextthree years – average 1.8%). New Zealand has achieved periods of Callaghan Innovation was established on 1 February 2013. It takesstrong real export growth in the past, for example an average of 5.7% over the current role of Industrial Research Limited, the Ministry ofbetween 1990 and 2003. But that was during a time of reasonably Business, Innovation & Employments business investment team andhigh global growth and the exchange rate was, for much of the the Auckland Food bowl.period, lower than it is currently. Callaghan Innovation is named after the late Sir Paul Callaghan, whoAchieving the governments 40% target will require a shift of championed the role science could play in making New Zealand aninvestment away from the production of goods and services for the economic success. Callaghan Innovation is one of thedomestic economy, and towards international markets. It will require Government’s key priorities to build a stronger, more competitiveinvestment to flow to opportunities in the export sector, as well as economy.the ability of labor and skills to shift in response to changingdemand. International experience suggests a shift of this magnitude Callaghan Innovation is a catalyst for the commercialization ofis possible with concerted effort and supportive macroeconomic science, engineering, technology and design. It serves complexconditions. needs of industry, government and research to benefit clients, partners, and New Zealands economy and society. As part ofAchieving this shift requires coordinated action across the six areas Budget 2012, the Government has allocated $166 million over fourof the governments Business Growth Agenda. For example, New years for Callaghan Innovation ($90 million opex and $76.1 millionZealand’s natural resource base, which is an important part of our capex).economic advantage, will need to be regulated to allow forsustainable growth of the primary sectors. 5.3 The challenge and opportunity for MaoriThe Government is also working hard to improve the ability of businesscapital markets to match investors and businesses so that capitalcan flow to the right places. Open capital flows with the rest of the The New Zealand Science and Innovation system has historicallyworld are vital; both as an important supplement to domestic saving, been overly complex and therefore out of reach of most Maoriand in ensuring our firms have strong connections to international Trusts, Incorporations and businesses with less than 1 percent of Private & Confidential 11
  12. 12. annual government investment delivering meaningful and realoutcomes for Maori. Callaghan Innovation is an attempt bygovernment to house both the science and innovation, and tradefunctions collectively under one roof.But, it is unlikely these changes will substantively improve Maoriaccess to the New Zealand Science and Innovation system at leastin the medium term (3 to 5 years) given the complexity of thesystem and, the inevitable resistance by key stakeholders like theresearch institutes to what is fundamental reform of the NewZealand Science and Innovation system.Maori Innovation strategyAccordingly, Maori must have a three-fold Innovation strategy: § Continue to advocate for greater access to the New Zealand Science Innovation system, including working alongside Government towards effective access to the resources of Callaghan Innovation; § Reach out directly to the leading Technology and Innovation Institutes of the world to find the capabilities, technologies and funds (including private sector) to enable Maori development; § Over the next 2 to 3 years develop deep and strategic relationships with the leading global researchers, technologists and innovators. Private & Confidential 12
  13. 13. 6.1 United Kingdom6. United Kingdom – European Profile The United Kingdom has historically played a leading role in developing parliamentary democracy and in advancing literature and science. At its zenith in the 19th century, the British EmpireThis section provides a historic and economic profile of both the stretched over one-fourth of the earths surface. The first half ofUnited Kingdom and those countries visited in Europe to provide the 20th century saw the UKs strength seriously depleted in twosome context to what has and will continue to shape the leading world wars and the Irish Republics withdrawal from the union. Thetechnology and especially manufacuring advances in western second half witnessed the dismantling of the Empire and the UKEurope. rebuilding itself into a modern and prosperous European nation. As one of five permanent members of the UN Security Council and aFigure 6: New Zealand growth per capita lags behind Europe 6 founding member of NATO and the Commonwealth, the UK pursues a global approach to foreign policy. The UK is also an active member of the EU, although it chose to remain outside the Economic and Monetary Union. The Scottish Parliament, the National Assembly for Wales, and the Northern Ireland Assembly were established in 1999. The latter was suspended until May 2007 due to wrangling over the peace process, but devolution was fully completed in March 2010. Economy - overview: The UK, a leading trading power and financial center, is the third largest economy in Europe after Germany and France. Over the past two decades, the government has greatly reduced public ownership and contained the growth of social welfare programs. Agriculture is intensive, highly mechanized, and efficient by European6 OECD Main Science and Technology Indicators 2011 Volume 2 Private & Confidential 13
  14. 14. standards, producing about 60% of food needs with less The German economy - the fifth largest economy in thethan 2% of the labor force. world in PPP terms and Europes largest - is a leading exporter of machinery, vehicles, chemicals, and household equipment and benefits from a highly skilled6.2 Germany labor force.As Europes largest economy and second most populous nation 6.3 Switzerland(after Russia), Germany is a key member of the continentseconomic, political, and defense organizations. European power The Swiss Confederation was founded in 1291 as a defensivestruggles immersed Germany in two devastating World Wars in the alliance among three cantons. In succeeding years, other localitiesfirst half of the 20th century and left the country occupied by the joined the original three. The Swiss Confederation secured itsvictorious Allied powers of the US, UK, France, and the Soviet Union independence from the Holy Roman Empire in 1499. A constitutionin 1945. With the advent of the Cold War, two German states were of 1848, subsequently modified in 1874, replaced the confederationformed in 1949: the western Federal Republic of Germany (FRG) and with a centralized federal government. Switzerlands sovereignty andthe eastern German Democratic Republic (GDR). The democratic neutrality have long been honored by the major European powers,FRG embedded itself in key Western economic and security and the country was not involved in either of the two world wars.organizations, the EC, which became the EU, and NATO, while the The political and economic integration of Europe over the past half-Communist GDR was on the front line of the Soviet-led Warsaw century, as well as Switzerlands role in many UN and internationalPact. organizations, has strengthened Switzerlands ties with its neighbors.The decline of the USSR and the end of the Cold War allowed for However, the country did not officially become a UN member untilGerman unification in 1990. Since then, Germany has expended 2002. Switzerland remains active in many UN and internationalconsiderable funds to bring Eastern productivity and wages up to organizations but retains a strong commitment to neutrality.Western standards. Economy overview:In January 1999, Germany and 10 other EU countries introduced acommon European exchange currency, the euro. In January 2011, Switzerland is a peaceful, prosperous, and modern market economyGermany assumed a nonpermanent seat on the UN Security Council with low unemployment, a highly skilled labor force, and a per capitafor the 2011-12 term. GDP among the highest in the world.Economy overview: Private & Confidential 14
  15. 15. Switzerlands economy benefits from a highly developedservice sector, led by financial services, and amanufacturing industry that specializes in high Industrial activity is predominantly in food processing,technology, knowledge-based production. Its economic chemicals, petroleum refining, and electrical machinery.and political stability, transparent legal system, A highly mechanized agricultural sector employs only 2%exceptional infrastructure, efficient capital markets, and of the labor force but provides large surpluses for thelow corporate tax rates also make Switzerland one of the food-processing industry and for exports.worlds most competitive economies. The Netherlands, along with 11 of its EU partners, began circulating6.4 The Netherlands the euro currency on 1 January 2002. After 26 years of uninterrupted economic growth, the Dutch economy - highlyThe Dutch United Provinces declared their independence from dependent on an international financial sector and internationalSpain in 1579; during the 17th century, they became a leading trade - contracted by 3.5% in 2009 as a result of the global financialseafaring and commercial power, with settlements and colonies crisis. The Dutch financial sector suffered, due in part to the higharound the world. exposure of some Dutch banks to U.S. mortgage-backed securities. In 2008, the government nationalized two banks and injected billionsAfter a 20-year French occupation, a Kingdom of the Netherlands of dollars of capital into other financial institutions, to preventwas formed in 1815. In 1830 Belgium seceded and formed a further deterioration of a crucial sector.separate kingdom. The Netherlands remained neutral in World War I,but suffered invasion and occupation by Germany in World War II. A The government also sought to boost the domestic economy bymodern, industrialized nation, the Netherlands is also a large accelerating infrastructure programs, offering corporate tax breaksexporter of agricultural products. for employers to retain workers, and expanding export credit facilities.The country was a founding member of NATO and the EEC (now theEU), and participated in the introduction of the euro in 1999. This section concludes the following key points:Economy - overview: § Agriculture and food production are a major part of the New Zealand economy and likely always will be;The Dutch economy is the fifth-largest economy in the euro-zone § Relative to well developed European economies, Newand is noted for its stable industrial relations, moderate Zealand lags substantially behind these economies on aunemployment and inflation, a sizable trade surplus, and an GDP per capita basis;important role as a European transportation hub. Private & Confidential 15
  16. 16. § Western European economies have highly advanced capabilities in food production and agriculture relative to New Zealand.To bridge this gap, New Zealand and Maori must find ways to lift ourproductivity if we are to be competitive in global food markets. Wemust innovate and introduce new technology, and do it quickly. Private & Confidential 16
  17. 17. Our science strategy aims to understand the working of the7. Institute of Food Research intestinal tract, how food-borne bacteria can cause human disease, and how the chemical and physical nature of our food influences (Norwich, London) health and can add value to the food chain. We have strategic relationships with other BBSRC institutes, the University of EastThe Institute of Food Research (IFR) aims to fulfil a UK and Anglia and Imperial College, London.international leadership role in delivering: 7.2 Research themes § Fundamental food & health research; § Applied and translational research in food & health for IFR Science within the strategic programmes covers a number of societal benefit; and research themes: § High level training in food and health research § Effective networks with: § Food structure; o Academic and research centres for research and § Food bio actives; training § Exploitation of co-products and wastes; o Food industry for strategic research and § How the GI-tract functions; knowledge exchange § Microbial food safety; and § Bio mathematical approaches in food safety & gut.7.1 IFR ScienceIFR is one of eight institutes that receive strategic funding from theBiotechnology and the Biological Sciences Research Council(BBSRC).IFR science aims to meet the challenges of supplying safe,nutritious food that promotes healthy ageing now and in the future.IFR provides underpinning science for government and the foodmanufacturing industry.IFR has two strategic research programmes:Gut Health and Food Safety, and Food and Health. Private & Confidential 17
  18. 18. Leatherhead has a unique mix of food safety expertise, information8. Leatherhead Institute (Surrey, resources and facilities. Their "concept to market" approach and integrated range of services delivers value to clients businesses. London) Global Food RegulationsLeatherhead Food Research delivers integrated scientific expertise Leatherhead’s language capabilities and food legislation coverage inand international regulatory advice to the global food, drink and over 80 countries is unrivalled; supporting the global food andrelated industries. beverage industry to achieve and maintain regulatory compliance.8.1 Research capabilities Sensory, Consumer and Market Insight Their trained sensory panel, extensive consumer database andFood Innovation market intelligence expertise, together with investment in newWorks with clients clients throughout the lifecycle of a product. technologies such as SenseReach™, ensure that they deliver theFrom design and development through to implementation and best solutions in sensory, consumer and market insights to theircompliance, Leatherheads integrated solutions deliver cost- clients.effective commercial outcomes. § Ingredients; § Pilot Plant; § Product Development; § Shelf Life; § Texture and Mouthfeel; § Troubleshooting / Crisis Management; § Nanotechnology; § Food Innovation Research; and § Back of Pack.NutritionLeatherheads clinical knowledge and statistical expertise, can designand execute human intervention studies to take a product fromconcept to claim substantiation.Food Safety Private & Confidential 18
  19. 19. 9. Wageningen Institute – The The strength of Wageningen UR lies in its ability to join the forces of specialised research institutes and Wageningen University. It also Netherlands lies in the combined efforts of the various fields of natural and social sciences. This union of expertise leads to scientific9.1 About Wageningen UR breakthroughs that can quickly be put into practice and be incorporated into education. This is the Wageningen Approach.Wageningen University, part of Wageningen UR, is the only universityin the Netherlands that specifically focuses on the theme ‘healthy 9.2 Key research themesfood and living environment’ by working closely together withgovernments and the business community. § Adaptive agriculture; § Biobased economy; ‘To explore the potential of nature to improve the quality of life’ § Fishing and Aquaculture; § Climate and water;That is the mission of Wageningen UR (University & Research § Ecosystem governance;centre). A staff of 6,500 and 10,000 students from over 100 § Food and Nutrition Security;countries work everywhere around the world in the domain of § Greenhouse technology;healthy food and living environment for governments and the § Market and chain strategies; andbusiness community-at-large. § Sustainable markets.Figure 7: Wageningen global project reach Below are but two brief profiles of some of the capabilities at Wageningen UR that have very real and practical application with Maori fishing and agriculture interests. Wageningen UR Greenhouse Horticulture Wageningen UR Greenhouse Horticulture is an independent international research institute that offers genuine quality and reliability. With 120 employees, we have access to a wide range of knowledge and expertise in all relevant fields, as well as research facilities and demo greenhouses that are unique in the world. Private & Confidential 19
  20. 20. Institute for Marine Resources & Ecosystem Studies IMARES (Institute for Marine Resources and Ecosystem Studies) is the Netherlands research institute established to provide the scientific support that is essential for developing policies and innovation in respect of the marine environment, fishery activities, aquaculture and the maritime sector.Some facts and figures of protected cultivation in TheNetherlands: Figure 8: The team at Wageningen in the Netherlands § Glasshouse area: 10.000 ha; § Market-oriented production; § High production levels; § High quality; § Exact timeline of production; § Average annual turnover €45/m2=NZ$72/m2; § Dutch greenhouse horticulture is considered most advanced worldwide; and § Energy saving and utilizing alternative resources has a high priority. Private & Confidential 20
  21. 21. 10. German Institute of Food Briefly the Institutes focus is on: Technologies - Germany § Process technology; o Pulsed Electric Field ProcessingThe German Institute of Food Technologies (ger. Deutsches Institut o Extrusionfür Lebensmitteltechnik e.V. - DIL) is a non-governmental and self- o High Pressure Processingfinancing research institute supported by more than 120 members o Ultrasound/Shockwave Technologyfrom fields of food production, mechanical engineering, process o Application of supercritical fluidsengineering and metrology. The DIL was founded in 1983 and is § Food safety;situated in the county of Osnabrück, one of the regions with the § Food Physics;highest numbers of full-time employees and highest density of food § Structure and functionality;industry enterprises in Germany. § Biotechnology; § Robotics; andThe research focus of the DIL is to develop innovative methods for § Process analysis.food production, quality assurance and process optimization.Beneficiaries of new insights in food technology are small andmedium-sized enterprises. Stated as main objective is the 10.1 Knowledge for Superior Foods strategyimprovement of efficiency and increase of competitiveness ofcompanies from the food industry. While at DIL we observed a number of these technologies including new shockwave technology used to tenderise meat and HighDIL is a leading R+D service provider for innovative processing Pressure Processing technology to extend shelf life.technologies. The institute’s unique range of expertise in materialscience and engineering opens up new opportunities for advanced Shockwave technologytechnologies to be applied for a more efficient and sustainable food It is possible to use mechanical forces for the tenderization of beef,production. The competitiveness of the food industry is strongly pork and poultry meat. The application of underwater shockwavesrelated to the production processes applied. Apart from energy has shown to be a highly efficient physical method to effect meatoptimization, material efficiency, and automation, all of which have a tissue disintegration and accelerate meat maturation. The underlyingdirect impact on the margins, the need for product innovation and mechanism of action is related to energy dissipation and mechanicalsafety aspects is often requesting novel processing approaches. stress at the boundary areas of meat and connective tissue, based on different sound velocity and acoustic impedance.DIL finances itself by 90% through external funds, out of which 55%are used to cooperate directly with members of the DIL Private & Confidential 21
  22. 22. Shockwaves with the required energy density can be generated by The shelf life of marinated poultry meat, for example, can beexplosives, but also by underwater discharge of electrical energy. extended from 10 days to up to 4 weeks with this method. The technology retains the taste and freshness of the product to theThis electro-hydraulic generation of shockwaves allows for an highest possible extent.energy efficient and safe application.High Pressure Processing (extending shelf life)Given the distance from northern hemiphere markets for producefrom Maori businesses, maintaining freshness and extending shelflife for our produce is hugely important. We observed this HighPressure processing technology in the laboratory where pressureapplication can be used for the preservation of solid and liquid foodproducts at ambient temperature.The process requires only a few minutes and meets the highesthygienic requirements, as the products can be treated in their finalpackage. Product examples include raw and cooked sausages,marinated meat products, ready to eat meals, seafood as well asfruit salads and fruit preparations. Private & Confidential 22
  23. 23. ETH Zurich helps to find long-term solutions to global challenges.11. Swiss Federal Institute of The focal points of its research include: Technology (ETH Zurich) - § Energy supply; Switzerland § Risk management; § Developing the cities of the future; and § Global food security and human health.ETH Zurich is one of the leading international universities fortechnology and the natural sciences. It is well-known for itsexcellent education, ground-breaking fundamental research and for 11.2 Paper on The Maori economyputting its new findings directly into practice. It offers researchersan inspiring working environment and its students a comprehensive I presented a paper on development of the Maori economy and theeducation. critically important role of world class knowledge and new technology as a key enabler of the Maori economy going forward.11.1 Brief historyFounded in 1855, ETH Zurich today has some 18,000 students fromover 100 different countries, 3,800 of whom are doctoral students.About 500 professors currently teach and conduct research in theareas of engineering, architecture, mathematics, natural sciences,system-oriented sciences, and management and social sciences.ETH Zurich regularly appears at the top of international rankings asone of the best universities in the world. 21 Nobel Laureates havestudied, taught or conducted research at ETH Zurich, underliningthe excellent reputation of the institute.Transferring its knowledge to the private sector and society at largeis one of ETH Zurich’s primary concerns. It does this verysuccessfully, as borne out by the 80 new patent applications eachyear and some 260 spin-off companies that emerged from theinstitute between 1996 and 2012. Private & Confidential 23
  24. 24. 12. Festel Capital - Switzerland Festel Capital partners have expressed a very clear interest to work with Maori businesses along this journey.While not officially part of the trip itinerary, I took the opportunity tomeet with a representative of Seftel Caiptal based at the ETHcampus in Zurich.Festel Capital is an advisory and investment company focused onthe commercialisation of new technologies:12.1 Background – Festel Capital: § Is an advisory and investment company (not a consultancy) focussed on the commercialisation of early-stage new technologies in the area of health, nutrition, energy, materials and environment; § Works based on a cost/profit sharing model with co- operation partners and not a fee-for-service model; § Has a good overview of the European technology landscape in these areas; § Has supported the foundation of 8 biotech/nanotech start-ups in Germany and Switzerland based on the FOUNDING ANGELS investment model; and § Is a team consisting of three professionals located in central Switzerland.As our more and more Maori businesses embrace the technologyand innovation challenge to lift the productivity of our variousassets, just like we will need the best technology and researchpartners of the world, we will also need expert commercialisationpartners and possible new venture start up funding to launch newMaori ventures. Private & Confidential 24
  25. 25. student completions and the highest level of research income.13. New Zealand Universities, Crown Graduate students are part of a large and diverse cohort in an environment of very strong support for staff and student research. Research Institute’s and local opportunities for collaboration In terms of Maori food research, the following faculties are housed at the University of Auckland:A very important side benefit of the European trip was to spend § Faculty of Engineering;time together with leaders from a number of New Zealand § Faculty of Science;Universities and Crown Research Institutes active in the Food § Liggins Institute; and theInnovation and technology space. § Auckland Bioengineering Institute.It became very clear that these institutions too have both strongtechnical capabilities and have developed important technologies New Zealand’s premier research commercialisationand innovations to the Maori economy. It was though dissappointing companyto have to travel the other side of the world to sit down and discusstogether the opportunity for collabrations together. The University of Auckland has developed New Zealand’s premierA series of meetings are now timetabled to happen over the next research commercialisation company, Auckland UniServices Ltd. Inmonth or so. just twenty years UniServices has grown to produce an income of over $NZ100 million per annum, far surpassing any similar operation13.1 The University of Auckland in New Zealand and most of those in Australia. This income derives from nationally and internationally competitive sources and from the commercialisation of intellectual property developed by staff andThe University of Auckland is New Zealand’s pre-eminent students at the University.research-led institution. Of the 600 researchers in the entire NewZealand tertiary system ranked as being of top international quality 13.2 Massey Universityin the Government’s latest Performance-Based Review Fund(PBRF) report, one-third are at The University of Auckland. Thisoffers students unparalleled opportunities to be taught and Massey University was formally constituted on the merger of twosupervised by many of the very best academics in the country. prior institutions - Massey Agricultural College, focussed on land- based industries; and Palmerston North University College,The University of Auckland also has the largest graduate school in established to provide New Zealand-wide distance education.the country, the largest annual number of postgraduate research Private & Confidential 25
  26. 26. Some of the relevant academic and research specialisation’s § Future Foods;relevant to Maori and food innovation are clustered as follows: § Functional Foods and Ingredients; and § Personalised or "I" Foods. § Agriculture, Veterinary and Life Sciences - including veterinary, agricultural and horticultural sciences, biomedical sciences, molecular biosciences, animal sciences; § Land, Water and the Environment - including soil and plant sciences, ecology and conservation, environmental planning and management, sustainable development; § Industrial Innovation through Engineering and Technology - including food technology, biotechnology, product development, material sciences, computer science, information sciences and engineering, telecommunications; § Business and Enterprise - including management, accountancy, marketing, economics and finance, enterprise development, aviation management; § Māori Development - including te reo Māori, history and heritage, Māori education, visual arts, health, and whanau development; 13.3 Lincoln UniversityThe Riddett Institute Lincoln is New Zealand’s third oldest university. Founded in 1878 asThe Riddet Institute is a national Centre of Research Excellence a School of Agriculture, the organisation was linked to Canterburyfocusing on food structures and digestive physiology. College, welcoming its first intake of students in 1880. Today, no other university in New Zealand has a higher rate of research dollarsThe goal of the Institute is to generate essential underpinning per full-time member of academic staff.knowledge that will provide the base of tomorrows innovations inadvanced foods. Research falls into three broad areas: Private & Confidential 26
  27. 27. Lincoln University is home to: § The Agribusiness and Economics Research Unit 13.5 Plant and Food Research (AERU), § The Centre for Soil and Environmental Quality and the Plant & Food Research is a New Zealand-based science company Isaac Centre for Nature Conservation; and providing research and development that adds value to fruit, § Home to the National Centre for Advanced Bio- vegetable, crop and food products. Protection Technologies, one of only seven Government-sponsored Centres of Research With over 900 people based at sites across New Zealand, as well as Excellence in New Zealand. in the USA and Australia, at the heart of Plant & Food Research is a goal to underpin the growth of plant and marine-based industry13.4 Otago University through the successful application and commercialisation of research-based innovation.Food Science at Otago University It;’s science supports the sustainable production of high qualityThe work of food scientists at Otago has an increasing importance produce that earns a premium in international markets, as well asin todays modern industrialised world. Whilst distribution systems driving the design and development of new and novel functionaland processing techniques continue to improve, consumers are foods that offer benefits to human health and wellbeing.demanding convenience products that are minimally processed,palatable and available throughout the year. Five Research Portfolio’s:The aim of the University of Otagos Food Science Department is toprepare students for creative, challenging, diverse and rewarding § Breeding and Genomicscareers in the food industry and to produce the next generation of o Building knowledge of key traits at the molecularcritical thinkers, industry leaders and food science researchers. level to inform the development of new elite cultivars.They are charged with the job of processing, preserving and § Bioprotectiondistributing food of high quality, which is both safe and tasty to eat. o Effective control of pest and disease to protect export market access.They use their skills to develop new, improved products or devise § Sustaianble productionmore economical production processes. The challenge in the future o Systems that increase efficiency and retain qualityis to improve the nutritional quality of food, conserve the worlds across the supply chain.food supply and reduce environmental impact. Private & Confidential 27
  28. 28. § Food Innovation § ensure that New Zealand’s pastoral sector is able to o Identifying intrinsic health benefits in natural protect, maintain and grow its global market access produce to develop new foods and beverages § increase the capacity of rural communities and § Seafood technologies enterprises to adapt to changing farming conditions in o Optimising the value and quality of seafood and ways that balance economic, environment, social and aquaculture. cultural imperatives.13.6 AgResearch Scope of OperationPurpose To achieve these outcomes, AgResearch is the lead CRI in the following areas:AgResearch’s purpose is to enhance the value, productivity andprofitability of New Zealand’s pastoral, agri-food and agri- § pasture-based animal production systemstechnology sector value chains to contribute to economic growth § new pasture plant varietiesand beneficial environmental and social outcomes for New Zealand. § agriculture-derived greenhouse gas mitigation and pastoral climate change adaptation § agri-food and bio-based products and agri-Outcomes technologies § integrated social and biophysical research to supportAgResearch will fulfil its purpose through the provision of research pastoral sector development.and transfer of technology and knowledge in partnership with keystakeholders, including industry, government and Māori, to: AgResearch work’s with other research providers and end-users to contribute to the development of the following areas: § increase the value of these industry sectors to the New Zealand economy through the development of § biosecurity, land, soil and freshwater management high-value pastoral-based products and production § climate change adaptation and mitigation systems that meet current and future global market § food and beverage sector (including foods for human needs nutrition and health, food technologies and food safety). § position New Zealand as a global leader in the development of environmentally sustainable, safe and ethical pastoral production systems and products Private & Confidential 28
  29. 29. 14. Conclusions and Opportunities for Maori business enabled by European Food Innovation and Technologies14.1 Key Conclusions and Opportunties for Maori business: • War in the early to mid 1900’s has left Western Europe with incredible industrial technology and manufacturing capabilities where today many of these countries have engeneered their entire economies off the back of these capabilities. And, they haven’t stopped where many of the institutes visited continue to be engaged by the leading food companies of the world to drive their new product development in food. • As New Zealand and Maori, in relative terms our food production and new product development significantly lag behind that of our Western European counterparts (and competitors). • The opportunity is ripe for Maori food businesses to catch up quickly by finding and introducing especially European technologies and innovations into our businesses and not waste time and money re-inventing the wheel. The introduction of these technologies will enable our businesses to fast track into the growth markets of the emerging economies like China, India and South America.14.2 Specific trip outcomes:From the European trip, the following clear outcomes have been derived and generated: • A database of leading New Zealand food technology institutes and their capabilities: • A database of leading European food technology institutes and their capabilitiess; • Specific individual contacts (email, phone contacts etc) within both New Zealand and European Institutes; • A strong sense for which Institutions have the particular key capabilities relevant to Maori food businesses; • A project list and priorities that can bring together leading New Zealand and European capabilities with the specific interests of Maori businesses; • A strong sense on how the New zealand Government reforms on International Trade and Innovation can align directly to the interests of Maori business; • A schedule of New zealand and European funding streams for possible co-investment in Maori food business projects.Private l& Confidential 29
  30. 30. 15. Now then.., how to make this all happen (and quickly)15.1 Phase 1: Information sharing across Maori business • Provide Initail Impressions Trip Report to all iwi Chairs, Maori Business leaders, Trust and Incorporation Chair’s (done); • Provide Detailed Trip report iwi Chairs, Maori Business leaders, Trust and Incorporation Chair’s (done, this report); • Gather and collate feedback from iwi and Maori business (by end of March, 2013); • Meet with New Zealand Universities and Crown Research Institutes (CRI’s) involved in the tour to identify possible collaborations with Maori busniesses (in food innovation by end of April, 2013).15.2 Phase 2: Individual Project Scoping • From Phase 1, identify key Maori food innovation projects and possible Maori business participants for each project; • Scope each project with clear and measurable market drivers and signals; • Identify technology and innovation gaps for each project; • Identify across New zealand and European Food Technology Institutes whether existing technology exists; o Where existing technology exists, develop a technology transfer plan to bring these technologies into Maori businesses; o Work with Maori businesses to successfully transfer the technologies into their businesses. • Where existing technologies do not exist (New zealand and across Europe), work with Maori businesses to: o Scope individual research projects; o Find other Maori businesses interested in the same projects and agree partnership arrangements; o Find best technology providers to deliver the research project; o Engage technology providers to undertake research. Critically this will include setting very clear IP rules and protocols best protecting the interests of Maori business participants; o Scope and manage technology providers to deliver against the agreed research outcomes; o Work with and assist Maori businesses to successfully commercialise the new research outcomes. Private & Confidential 30
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