Cognitive PedagogyDitching the Lecture and Teaching for the BrainChristopher DickmanSaint Louis UniversityTHATCamp Pedagog...
The Disclaimers      “Shut Your Brain Down” by toettoet under CC BY-NC 2.0
The DisclaimersEffective metaphors       “Shut Your Brain Down” by toettoet under CC BY-NC 2.0
The DisclaimersEffective metaphorsExplanatory, not predictive        “Shut Your Brain Down” by toettoet under CC BY-NC 2.0
The DisclaimersEffective metaphorsExplanatory, not predictiveStrategies, not rules        “Shut Your Brain Down” by toetto...
The DisclaimersEffective metaphorsExplanatory, not predictiveStrategies, not rulesKnow when to fold ‘em        “Shut Your ...
The DisclaimersEffective metaphorsExplanatory, not predictiveStrategies, not rulesKnow when to fold ‘emIndividual Attentio...
The Order            Nautilus Pompilius by kibuyu under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
The Order1. Background                Nautilus Pompilius by kibuyu under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
The Order1. Background2. Individual work (Active learning)                        Nautilus Pompilius by kibuyu under CC BY...
The Order1. Background2. Individual work (Active learning)3. Group discussion (Immediate feedback, Metacognition)         ...
The Order1. Background2. Individual work (Active learning)3. Group discussion (Immediate feedback, Metacognition)4. Revisi...
The Order1. Background2. Individual work (Active learning)3. Group discussion (Immediate feedback, Metacognition)4. Revisi...
The Order1. Background2. Individual work (Active learning)3. Group discussion (Immediate feedback, Metacognition)4. Revisi...
The Brain            “Stone Brain” by Rebecca Lee under CC BY-SA                                 2.0
The BrainNeither a blank slate nor a template                       “Stone Brain” by Rebecca Lee under CC BY-SA           ...
The BrainNeither a blank slate nor a templatePlastic                       “Stone Brain” by Rebecca Lee under CC BY-SA    ...
The BrainNeither a blank slate nor a templatePlasticHas Working Memory and....                       “Stone Brain” by Rebe...
The BrainNeither a blank slate nor a templatePlasticHas Working Memory and....Long-Term Memory                       “Ston...
The BrainNeither a blank slate nor a templatePlasticHas Working Memory and....Long-Term MemoryLearning is about connection...
The Connections                  “Synapse” by gasboyben under CC NC 2.0
The Connections“Cells that fire together wire together.”                            “Synapse” by gasboyben under CC NC 2.0
The Connections“Cells that fire together wire together.”Connect current activity/ideas to....                            “...
The Connections“Cells that fire together wire together.”Connect current activity/ideas to.... Long-Term Memory            ...
The Connections“Cells that fire together wire together.”Connect current activity/ideas to.... Long-Term Memory Personal Sc...
The Connections“Cells that fire together wire together.”Connect current activity/ideas to.... Long-Term Memory Personal Sc...
The Connections“Cells that fire together wire together.”Connect current activity/ideas to.... Long-Term Memory Personal Sc...
The Methods              “drafting drafting drafting” by B Rosen under CC BY-ND 2.0
The MethodsActive Learning                  “drafting drafting drafting” by B Rosen under CC BY-ND 2.0
The MethodsActive LearningImmediate Feedback                     “drafting drafting drafting” by B Rosen under CC BY-ND 2.0
The MethodsActive LearningImmediate FeedbackMetacognition                     “drafting drafting drafting” by B Rosen unde...
The MethodsActive LearningImmediate FeedbackMetacognitionWhat we’ll do in this workshop: •Hear about each •Brainstorm Appl...
Step One           “Number One” by FreeFoto under CC BY-NC-ND 3.0
Step OneCreate a space to write down some notes                      “Number One” by FreeFoto under CC BY-NC-ND 3.0
Step OneCreate a space to write down some notesThink of an activity, lesson plan, or project foryour class  Past, present,...
Step OneCreate a space to write down some notesThink of an activity, lesson plan, or project foryour class  Past, present,...
Step Two           “Bingo Number 2” by Leo Reynolds under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
Step TwoPartner up             “Bingo Number 2” by Leo Reynolds under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
Step TwoPartner upBriefly discuss the activity you chose as wellas:                     “Bingo Number 2” by Leo Reynolds u...
Step TwoPartner upBriefly discuss the activity you chose as wellas: Its general goals                     “Bingo Number 2”...
Step TwoPartner upBriefly discuss the activity you chose as wellas: Its general goals Your methods                     “Bi...
Active Learning              “Day 37 - Playing Piano” by Mourner under CC BY-NC 2.0
Active Learning The brain likes activity, experimentation, and play (ABL, PBL)                      “Day 37 - Playing Pian...
Active Learning The brain likes activity, experimentation, and play (ABL, PBL) Dual-Coding Theory                      “Da...
Active Learning The brain likes activity, experimentation, and play (ABL, PBL) Dual-Coding Theory Learning from mistakes a...
Active Learning The brain likes activity, experimentation, and play (ABL, PBL) Dual-Coding Theory Learning from mistakes a...
Active Learning The brain likes activity, experimentation, and play (ABL, PBL) Dual-Coding Theory Learning from mistakes a...
Step Three             “Number 3” by Leo Reynolds under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
Step ThreeDiscuss with partner how you might/dointroduce active learning into your activity                         “Numbe...
Step ThreeDiscuss with partner how you might/dointroduce active learning into your activityDiscuss tools you might use to ...
Step ThreeDiscuss with partner how you might/dointroduce active learning into your activityDiscuss tools you might use to ...
Immediate Feedback         “Social Network Profiles in Mind” by Hank Groebe under CC BY-NC 2.0
Immediate FeedbackWhy we get so good at video games             “Social Network Profiles in Mind” by Hank Groebe under CC ...
Immediate FeedbackWhy we get so good at video gamesHelps neurons wire together             “Social Network Profiles in Min...
Immediate FeedbackWhy we get so good at video gamesHelps neurons wire togetherTime lost is opportunity lost               ...
Immediate FeedbackWhy we get so good at video gamesHelps neurons wire togetherTime lost is opportunity lostSocial beings, ...
Immediate FeedbackWhy we get so good at video gamesHelps neurons wire togetherTime lost is opportunity lostSocial beings, ...
Step Four            “Number - 4” by szczel under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
Step FourDiscuss with your partner how you mightintroduce immediate feedback into youractivity                        “Num...
Step FourDiscuss with your partner how you mightintroduce immediate feedback into youractivityDiscuss tools you might use ...
Step FourDiscuss with your partner how you mightintroduce immediate feedback into youractivityDiscuss tools you might use ...
Metacognition “Brainstorming Organisering” by NTNU Engineering Science and Technology under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)
MetacognitionConnect and correct “Brainstorming Organisering” by NTNU Engineering Science and Technology under CC BY-NC-SA...
MetacognitionConnect and correctMake work visible “Brainstorming Organisering” by NTNU Engineering Science and Technology ...
MetacognitionConnect and correctMake work visiblePut it in contrast “Brainstorming Organisering” by NTNU Engineering Scien...
MetacognitionConnect and correctMake work visiblePut it in contrastPeer editing, public work “Brainstorming Organisering” ...
MetacognitionConnect and correctMake work visiblePut it in contrastPeer editing, public workEvaluate and Reflect “Brainsto...
MetacognitionConnect and correctMake work visiblePut it in contrastPeer editing, public workEvaluate and ReflectFocus on r...
MetacognitionConnect and correctMake work visiblePut it in contrastPeer editing, public workEvaluate and ReflectFocus on r...
Step Five            “5” by svenwerk under CC NA-ND 2.0
Step FiveDiscuss with your partner how you mightintroduce metacognition into your activity                               “...
Step FiveDiscuss with your partner how you mightintroduce metacognition into your activityDiscuss tools you might use to f...
Step FiveDiscuss with your partner how you mightintroduce metacognition into your activityDiscuss tools you might use to f...
Keep in Mind....           “Boatwright Computer Classroom” by Boatwright Memorial Library           under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
Keep in Mind.... Working Memory Overload Goals of Teaching  Content v. Strategy Role of the Teacher  Expert v. Consultant/...
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Cognitive Pedagogy

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We learn when neurons in our brain make strong connections. In this presentation, I discuss three pedagogical methods that help facilitate those conventions. Short take away: don't lecture.

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  • Open with:\n-Coming from comp/rhet\n-Lecture also means direct instruction, teacher-centered\n
  • -Effective Metaphors: Talk as if computer, much more complicated, adaptive, and random\n\n-Help explain why some methodologies often work better, but don’t predict success\n\n-We’ll talk about and develop some strategies, but these aren’t rules. Every brain is different, every person is different, so...\n\n-...be aware of when they aren’t working for class or person. \n \n-We want to find ways of using these strategies with individuals\n
  • -Effective Metaphors: Talk as if computer, much more complicated, adaptive, and random\n\n-Help explain why some methodologies often work better, but don’t predict success\n\n-We’ll talk about and develop some strategies, but these aren’t rules. Every brain is different, every person is different, so...\n\n-...be aware of when they aren’t working for class or person. \n \n-We want to find ways of using these strategies with individuals\n
  • -Effective Metaphors: Talk as if computer, much more complicated, adaptive, and random\n\n-Help explain why some methodologies often work better, but don’t predict success\n\n-We’ll talk about and develop some strategies, but these aren’t rules. Every brain is different, every person is different, so...\n\n-...be aware of when they aren’t working for class or person. \n \n-We want to find ways of using these strategies with individuals\n
  • -Effective Metaphors: Talk as if computer, much more complicated, adaptive, and random\n\n-Help explain why some methodologies often work better, but don’t predict success\n\n-We’ll talk about and develop some strategies, but these aren’t rules. Every brain is different, every person is different, so...\n\n-...be aware of when they aren’t working for class or person. \n \n-We want to find ways of using these strategies with individuals\n
  • -Effective Metaphors: Talk as if computer, much more complicated, adaptive, and random\n\n-Help explain why some methodologies often work better, but don’t predict success\n\n-We’ll talk about and develop some strategies, but these aren’t rules. Every brain is different, every person is different, so...\n\n-...be aware of when they aren’t working for class or person. \n \n-We want to find ways of using these strategies with individuals\n
  • -This is the general order of our workshop to do. You’ll hear a little from me, then work amongst yourselves and in small groups, and we’ll repeat that a few times as we revise our own ideas based on what I’m going to talk about.\n
  • -This is the general order of our workshop to do. You’ll hear a little from me, then work amongst yourselves and in small groups, and we’ll repeat that a few times as we revise our own ideas based on what I’m going to talk about.\n
  • -This is the general order of our workshop to do. You’ll hear a little from me, then work amongst yourselves and in small groups, and we’ll repeat that a few times as we revise our own ideas based on what I’m going to talk about.\n
  • -This is the general order of our workshop to do. You’ll hear a little from me, then work amongst yourselves and in small groups, and we’ll repeat that a few times as we revise our own ideas based on what I’m going to talk about.\n
  • -This is the general order of our workshop to do. You’ll hear a little from me, then work amongst yourselves and in small groups, and we’ll repeat that a few times as we revise our own ideas based on what I’m going to talk about.\n
  • -This is the general order of our workshop to do. You’ll hear a little from me, then work amongst yourselves and in small groups, and we’ll repeat that a few times as we revise our own ideas based on what I’m going to talk about.\n
  • -Neither John Locke’s blank slate, nor is it a computer set by our genes\n\n-It’s in the middle, where we can work WITH its basic functions and can work in order TO change it\n\n-Meaning it’s extremely plastic: through our lifetime, its specific structure can change and re-change constantly. \n-We want to use this to our advantage\n\n-Two metaphors: sound scientific, are good ways of explaining what happens when we learn\n\n-Working Memory (used to be called short term) controlled by “Central Executive” that coordinates the information \n-It has a limit that, while it can grow, is never infinite. It can be overloaded\n-How much can we teach? Tools AND content?\n\n-NOT a call to dumb things down, but developing methods to best push abilities\n\n-LTM - We can think of this as “storage,” but it’s also our various schemas (we can think of these as strategies) on how to approach things. In that sense, it’s responsible for how we learn, and we can get better at learning specific things. We have to take into account that our students are also developing their learning skills and schemas. \n\n-The brain is all about making connections\n
  • -Neither John Locke’s blank slate, nor is it a computer set by our genes\n\n-It’s in the middle, where we can work WITH its basic functions and can work in order TO change it\n\n-Meaning it’s extremely plastic: through our lifetime, its specific structure can change and re-change constantly. \n-We want to use this to our advantage\n\n-Two metaphors: sound scientific, are good ways of explaining what happens when we learn\n\n-Working Memory (used to be called short term) controlled by “Central Executive” that coordinates the information \n-It has a limit that, while it can grow, is never infinite. It can be overloaded\n-How much can we teach? Tools AND content?\n\n-NOT a call to dumb things down, but developing methods to best push abilities\n\n-LTM - We can think of this as “storage,” but it’s also our various schemas (we can think of these as strategies) on how to approach things. In that sense, it’s responsible for how we learn, and we can get better at learning specific things. We have to take into account that our students are also developing their learning skills and schemas. \n\n-The brain is all about making connections\n
  • -Neither John Locke’s blank slate, nor is it a computer set by our genes\n\n-It’s in the middle, where we can work WITH its basic functions and can work in order TO change it\n\n-Meaning it’s extremely plastic: through our lifetime, its specific structure can change and re-change constantly. \n-We want to use this to our advantage\n\n-Two metaphors: sound scientific, are good ways of explaining what happens when we learn\n\n-Working Memory (used to be called short term) controlled by “Central Executive” that coordinates the information \n-It has a limit that, while it can grow, is never infinite. It can be overloaded\n-How much can we teach? Tools AND content?\n\n-NOT a call to dumb things down, but developing methods to best push abilities\n\n-LTM - We can think of this as “storage,” but it’s also our various schemas (we can think of these as strategies) on how to approach things. In that sense, it’s responsible for how we learn, and we can get better at learning specific things. We have to take into account that our students are also developing their learning skills and schemas. \n\n-The brain is all about making connections\n
  • -Neither John Locke’s blank slate, nor is it a computer set by our genes\n\n-It’s in the middle, where we can work WITH its basic functions and can work in order TO change it\n\n-Meaning it’s extremely plastic: through our lifetime, its specific structure can change and re-change constantly. \n-We want to use this to our advantage\n\n-Two metaphors: sound scientific, are good ways of explaining what happens when we learn\n\n-Working Memory (used to be called short term) controlled by “Central Executive” that coordinates the information \n-It has a limit that, while it can grow, is never infinite. It can be overloaded\n-How much can we teach? Tools AND content?\n\n-NOT a call to dumb things down, but developing methods to best push abilities\n\n-LTM - We can think of this as “storage,” but it’s also our various schemas (we can think of these as strategies) on how to approach things. In that sense, it’s responsible for how we learn, and we can get better at learning specific things. We have to take into account that our students are also developing their learning skills and schemas. \n\n-The brain is all about making connections\n
  • -Neither John Locke’s blank slate, nor is it a computer set by our genes\n\n-It’s in the middle, where we can work WITH its basic functions and can work in order TO change it\n\n-Meaning it’s extremely plastic: through our lifetime, its specific structure can change and re-change constantly. \n-We want to use this to our advantage\n\n-Two metaphors: sound scientific, are good ways of explaining what happens when we learn\n\n-Working Memory (used to be called short term) controlled by “Central Executive” that coordinates the information \n-It has a limit that, while it can grow, is never infinite. It can be overloaded\n-How much can we teach? Tools AND content?\n\n-NOT a call to dumb things down, but developing methods to best push abilities\n\n-LTM - We can think of this as “storage,” but it’s also our various schemas (we can think of these as strategies) on how to approach things. In that sense, it’s responsible for how we learn, and we can get better at learning specific things. We have to take into account that our students are also developing their learning skills and schemas. \n\n-The brain is all about making connections\n
  • -Hebb’s Law: Well known brain theory meaning that when a multiple neurons fire together in the brain, they make connections, and this is what helps retain and select knowledge, skills, and further schemas\n\n-So we want methods that will help foster and strengthen these connections\n\n-We want to try to connect what we’re doing in class or online to students’:\n-Long Term Memory and personal schemas \n-If we get the neurons we’re making fire to connect with other neurons that have fired, we’ve made a connection that is strong\n-Same with personal schemas\n\n-We also want to connect HOW they have learned to HOW they can learn, which means having student actively think about how they are processing the material of the class\n\n-Lastly, we’re social animals, and we learn by taking cues from others, so peer work is generally crucial\n
  • -Hebb’s Law: Well known brain theory meaning that when a multiple neurons fire together in the brain, they make connections, and this is what helps retain and select knowledge, skills, and further schemas\n\n-So we want methods that will help foster and strengthen these connections\n\n-We want to try to connect what we’re doing in class or online to students’:\n-Long Term Memory and personal schemas \n-If we get the neurons we’re making fire to connect with other neurons that have fired, we’ve made a connection that is strong\n-Same with personal schemas\n\n-We also want to connect HOW they have learned to HOW they can learn, which means having student actively think about how they are processing the material of the class\n\n-Lastly, we’re social animals, and we learn by taking cues from others, so peer work is generally crucial\n
  • -Hebb’s Law: Well known brain theory meaning that when a multiple neurons fire together in the brain, they make connections, and this is what helps retain and select knowledge, skills, and further schemas\n\n-So we want methods that will help foster and strengthen these connections\n\n-We want to try to connect what we’re doing in class or online to students’:\n-Long Term Memory and personal schemas \n-If we get the neurons we’re making fire to connect with other neurons that have fired, we’ve made a connection that is strong\n-Same with personal schemas\n\n-We also want to connect HOW they have learned to HOW they can learn, which means having student actively think about how they are processing the material of the class\n\n-Lastly, we’re social animals, and we learn by taking cues from others, so peer work is generally crucial\n
  • -Hebb’s Law: Well known brain theory meaning that when a multiple neurons fire together in the brain, they make connections, and this is what helps retain and select knowledge, skills, and further schemas\n\n-So we want methods that will help foster and strengthen these connections\n\n-We want to try to connect what we’re doing in class or online to students’:\n-Long Term Memory and personal schemas \n-If we get the neurons we’re making fire to connect with other neurons that have fired, we’ve made a connection that is strong\n-Same with personal schemas\n\n-We also want to connect HOW they have learned to HOW they can learn, which means having student actively think about how they are processing the material of the class\n\n-Lastly, we’re social animals, and we learn by taking cues from others, so peer work is generally crucial\n
  • -Hebb’s Law: Well known brain theory meaning that when a multiple neurons fire together in the brain, they make connections, and this is what helps retain and select knowledge, skills, and further schemas\n\n-So we want methods that will help foster and strengthen these connections\n\n-We want to try to connect what we’re doing in class or online to students’:\n-Long Term Memory and personal schemas \n-If we get the neurons we’re making fire to connect with other neurons that have fired, we’ve made a connection that is strong\n-Same with personal schemas\n\n-We also want to connect HOW they have learned to HOW they can learn, which means having student actively think about how they are processing the material of the class\n\n-Lastly, we’re social animals, and we learn by taking cues from others, so peer work is generally crucial\n
  • -Hebb’s Law: Well known brain theory meaning that when a multiple neurons fire together in the brain, they make connections, and this is what helps retain and select knowledge, skills, and further schemas\n\n-So we want methods that will help foster and strengthen these connections\n\n-We want to try to connect what we’re doing in class or online to students’:\n-Long Term Memory and personal schemas \n-If we get the neurons we’re making fire to connect with other neurons that have fired, we’ve made a connection that is strong\n-Same with personal schemas\n\n-We also want to connect HOW they have learned to HOW they can learn, which means having student actively think about how they are processing the material of the class\n\n-Lastly, we’re social animals, and we learn by taking cues from others, so peer work is generally crucial\n
  • -Ok, so how do we effect these neural connections that result in learning?\n-We’ll talk about three methods.\n-And our method here will be to hear about each in turn, think about how to apply them to our classes, and then discuss our results.\n
  • -Ok, so how do we effect these neural connections that result in learning?\n-We’ll talk about three methods.\n-And our method here will be to hear about each in turn, think about how to apply them to our classes, and then discuss our results.\n
  • -Ok, so how do we effect these neural connections that result in learning?\n-We’ll talk about three methods.\n-And our method here will be to hear about each in turn, think about how to apply them to our classes, and then discuss our results.\n
  • -Ok, so how do we effect these neural connections that result in learning?\n-We’ll talk about three methods.\n-And our method here will be to hear about each in turn, think about how to apply them to our classes, and then discuss our results.\n
  • -Ok, so how do we effect these neural connections that result in learning?\n-We’ll talk about three methods.\n-And our method here will be to hear about each in turn, think about how to apply them to our classes, and then discuss our results.\n
  • \n
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  • -Active learning is something much like it sounds - it means that students, in class, are DOING the content, skills, and strategies of the course, rather than hearing about that material. \n-This is the jumping off point for ditching the lecture\n\n-The brain loves activity, play, and experimentation. Why?\n-Again, connections. Dual-Coding theory has shown that when audio and visuals are presented in effective ways, more knowledge is retained. This is probably because you have two areas of the brain firing together about the same material, so you’re making connections\n\n-Active learning lets us learn from mistakes. You hear about people always saying that they learn so much from mistakes. Students need to try, do, fail, and try again. For one, it better allows them to revise schemas and strategies\n\n-Active learning means that the student is always bringing in their previous knowledge, skills, and strategies to the class, meaning they can more effectively retain material.\n-This is one thing lecture can never do, because it only addresses previous schema if you’re lucky.\n
  • -Active learning is something much like it sounds - it means that students, in class, are DOING the content, skills, and strategies of the course, rather than hearing about that material. \n-This is the jumping off point for ditching the lecture\n\n-The brain loves activity, play, and experimentation. Why?\n-Again, connections. Dual-Coding theory has shown that when audio and visuals are presented in effective ways, more knowledge is retained. This is probably because you have two areas of the brain firing together about the same material, so you’re making connections\n\n-Active learning lets us learn from mistakes. You hear about people always saying that they learn so much from mistakes. Students need to try, do, fail, and try again. For one, it better allows them to revise schemas and strategies\n\n-Active learning means that the student is always bringing in their previous knowledge, skills, and strategies to the class, meaning they can more effectively retain material.\n-This is one thing lecture can never do, because it only addresses previous schema if you’re lucky.\n
  • -Active learning is something much like it sounds - it means that students, in class, are DOING the content, skills, and strategies of the course, rather than hearing about that material. \n-This is the jumping off point for ditching the lecture\n\n-The brain loves activity, play, and experimentation. Why?\n-Again, connections. Dual-Coding theory has shown that when audio and visuals are presented in effective ways, more knowledge is retained. This is probably because you have two areas of the brain firing together about the same material, so you’re making connections\n\n-Active learning lets us learn from mistakes. You hear about people always saying that they learn so much from mistakes. Students need to try, do, fail, and try again. For one, it better allows them to revise schemas and strategies\n\n-Active learning means that the student is always bringing in their previous knowledge, skills, and strategies to the class, meaning they can more effectively retain material.\n-This is one thing lecture can never do, because it only addresses previous schema if you’re lucky.\n
  • -Active learning is something much like it sounds - it means that students, in class, are DOING the content, skills, and strategies of the course, rather than hearing about that material. \n-This is the jumping off point for ditching the lecture\n\n-The brain loves activity, play, and experimentation. Why?\n-Again, connections. Dual-Coding theory has shown that when audio and visuals are presented in effective ways, more knowledge is retained. This is probably because you have two areas of the brain firing together about the same material, so you’re making connections\n\n-Active learning lets us learn from mistakes. You hear about people always saying that they learn so much from mistakes. Students need to try, do, fail, and try again. For one, it better allows them to revise schemas and strategies\n\n-Active learning means that the student is always bringing in their previous knowledge, skills, and strategies to the class, meaning they can more effectively retain material.\n-This is one thing lecture can never do, because it only addresses previous schema if you’re lucky.\n
  • -Active learning is something much like it sounds - it means that students, in class, are DOING the content, skills, and strategies of the course, rather than hearing about that material. \n-This is the jumping off point for ditching the lecture\n\n-The brain loves activity, play, and experimentation. Why?\n-Again, connections. Dual-Coding theory has shown that when audio and visuals are presented in effective ways, more knowledge is retained. This is probably because you have two areas of the brain firing together about the same material, so you’re making connections\n\n-Active learning lets us learn from mistakes. You hear about people always saying that they learn so much from mistakes. Students need to try, do, fail, and try again. For one, it better allows them to revise schemas and strategies\n\n-Active learning means that the student is always bringing in their previous knowledge, skills, and strategies to the class, meaning they can more effectively retain material.\n-This is one thing lecture can never do, because it only addresses previous schema if you’re lucky.\n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • -Immediate feedback goes hand in hand with active learning, and why making mistakes is often so crucial\n\n-ImmFeed is one reason why we get so good at video games so much more quickly than other things. When we make a mistake, we see instantly its negative ramifications and know not to do that again. Those neurons fire together\n\n-Why immediate? Neural links can strengthen, and of course they can get weaker. The further between a mistake and its correction, the less likely neurons will fire together\n\n-As we said before, we are social animals, and we often get cues about\n
  • -Immediate feedback goes hand in hand with active learning, and why making mistakes is often so crucial\n\n-ImmFeed is one reason why we get so good at video games so much more quickly than other things. When we make a mistake, we see instantly its negative ramifications and know not to do that again. Those neurons fire together\n\n-Why immediate? Neural links can strengthen, and of course they can get weaker. The further between a mistake and its correction, the less likely neurons will fire together\n\n-As we said before, we are social animals, and we often get cues about\n
  • -Immediate feedback goes hand in hand with active learning, and why making mistakes is often so crucial\n\n-ImmFeed is one reason why we get so good at video games so much more quickly than other things. When we make a mistake, we see instantly its negative ramifications and know not to do that again. Those neurons fire together\n\n-Why immediate? Neural links can strengthen, and of course they can get weaker. The further between a mistake and its correction, the less likely neurons will fire together\n\n-As we said before, we are social animals, and we often get cues about\n
  • -Immediate feedback goes hand in hand with active learning, and why making mistakes is often so crucial\n\n-ImmFeed is one reason why we get so good at video games so much more quickly than other things. When we make a mistake, we see instantly its negative ramifications and know not to do that again. Those neurons fire together\n\n-Why immediate? Neural links can strengthen, and of course they can get weaker. The further between a mistake and its correction, the less likely neurons will fire together\n\n-As we said before, we are social animals, and we often get cues about\n
  • -Immediate feedback goes hand in hand with active learning, and why making mistakes is often so crucial\n\n-ImmFeed is one reason why we get so good at video games so much more quickly than other things. When we make a mistake, we see instantly its negative ramifications and know not to do that again. Those neurons fire together\n\n-Why immediate? Neural links can strengthen, and of course they can get weaker. The further between a mistake and its correction, the less likely neurons will fire together\n\n-As we said before, we are social animals, and we often get cues about\n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • -Metacognition is thinking about thinking, and it’s the most effective way to reorder schemas in LTM\n\n-Here, we want to connect what the student is currently doing to what they’ve done when at all possible. That means, of course, knowing our students and working with them closely, which is better enabled in the kind of workshop/studio format\n\n-Make work visible and put it in contrast\n-These two go hand in hand.. \n-Students need to see what other strategies are for any kind of assignment/problem solving\n-This is often best done with peer work, because asking them to instantly work like a pro is too big of a jump\n-We know, of course, that we need to actively reflect on our practices, but we need to make sure our students are doing this too, and that we specifically carve out time for these practices.\n\n-In metacognition, it’s best to focus on the rationale for what works and strategies rather than content.\n-Content will change for each situation, strategies often remain similar\n-This is the kind of knowledge that that separates experts from pros\n-NPR and American Radioworks “Don’t Lecture Me”\n
  • -Metacognition is thinking about thinking, and it’s the most effective way to reorder schemas in LTM\n\n-Here, we want to connect what the student is currently doing to what they’ve done when at all possible. That means, of course, knowing our students and working with them closely, which is better enabled in the kind of workshop/studio format\n\n-Make work visible and put it in contrast\n-These two go hand in hand.. \n-Students need to see what other strategies are for any kind of assignment/problem solving\n-This is often best done with peer work, because asking them to instantly work like a pro is too big of a jump\n-We know, of course, that we need to actively reflect on our practices, but we need to make sure our students are doing this too, and that we specifically carve out time for these practices.\n\n-In metacognition, it’s best to focus on the rationale for what works and strategies rather than content.\n-Content will change for each situation, strategies often remain similar\n-This is the kind of knowledge that that separates experts from pros\n-NPR and American Radioworks “Don’t Lecture Me”\n
  • -Metacognition is thinking about thinking, and it’s the most effective way to reorder schemas in LTM\n\n-Here, we want to connect what the student is currently doing to what they’ve done when at all possible. That means, of course, knowing our students and working with them closely, which is better enabled in the kind of workshop/studio format\n\n-Make work visible and put it in contrast\n-These two go hand in hand.. \n-Students need to see what other strategies are for any kind of assignment/problem solving\n-This is often best done with peer work, because asking them to instantly work like a pro is too big of a jump\n-We know, of course, that we need to actively reflect on our practices, but we need to make sure our students are doing this too, and that we specifically carve out time for these practices.\n\n-In metacognition, it’s best to focus on the rationale for what works and strategies rather than content.\n-Content will change for each situation, strategies often remain similar\n-This is the kind of knowledge that that separates experts from pros\n-NPR and American Radioworks “Don’t Lecture Me”\n
  • -Metacognition is thinking about thinking, and it’s the most effective way to reorder schemas in LTM\n\n-Here, we want to connect what the student is currently doing to what they’ve done when at all possible. That means, of course, knowing our students and working with them closely, which is better enabled in the kind of workshop/studio format\n\n-Make work visible and put it in contrast\n-These two go hand in hand.. \n-Students need to see what other strategies are for any kind of assignment/problem solving\n-This is often best done with peer work, because asking them to instantly work like a pro is too big of a jump\n-We know, of course, that we need to actively reflect on our practices, but we need to make sure our students are doing this too, and that we specifically carve out time for these practices.\n\n-In metacognition, it’s best to focus on the rationale for what works and strategies rather than content.\n-Content will change for each situation, strategies often remain similar\n-This is the kind of knowledge that that separates experts from pros\n-NPR and American Radioworks “Don’t Lecture Me”\n
  • -Metacognition is thinking about thinking, and it’s the most effective way to reorder schemas in LTM\n\n-Here, we want to connect what the student is currently doing to what they’ve done when at all possible. That means, of course, knowing our students and working with them closely, which is better enabled in the kind of workshop/studio format\n\n-Make work visible and put it in contrast\n-These two go hand in hand.. \n-Students need to see what other strategies are for any kind of assignment/problem solving\n-This is often best done with peer work, because asking them to instantly work like a pro is too big of a jump\n-We know, of course, that we need to actively reflect on our practices, but we need to make sure our students are doing this too, and that we specifically carve out time for these practices.\n\n-In metacognition, it’s best to focus on the rationale for what works and strategies rather than content.\n-Content will change for each situation, strategies often remain similar\n-This is the kind of knowledge that that separates experts from pros\n-NPR and American Radioworks “Don’t Lecture Me”\n
  • -Metacognition is thinking about thinking, and it’s the most effective way to reorder schemas in LTM\n\n-Here, we want to connect what the student is currently doing to what they’ve done when at all possible. That means, of course, knowing our students and working with them closely, which is better enabled in the kind of workshop/studio format\n\n-Make work visible and put it in contrast\n-These two go hand in hand.. \n-Students need to see what other strategies are for any kind of assignment/problem solving\n-This is often best done with peer work, because asking them to instantly work like a pro is too big of a jump\n-We know, of course, that we need to actively reflect on our practices, but we need to make sure our students are doing this too, and that we specifically carve out time for these practices.\n\n-In metacognition, it’s best to focus on the rationale for what works and strategies rather than content.\n-Content will change for each situation, strategies often remain similar\n-This is the kind of knowledge that that separates experts from pros\n-NPR and American Radioworks “Don’t Lecture Me”\n
  • -Metacognition is thinking about thinking, and it’s the most effective way to reorder schemas in LTM\n\n-Here, we want to connect what the student is currently doing to what they’ve done when at all possible. That means, of course, knowing our students and working with them closely, which is better enabled in the kind of workshop/studio format\n\n-Make work visible and put it in contrast\n-These two go hand in hand.. \n-Students need to see what other strategies are for any kind of assignment/problem solving\n-This is often best done with peer work, because asking them to instantly work like a pro is too big of a jump\n-We know, of course, that we need to actively reflect on our practices, but we need to make sure our students are doing this too, and that we specifically carve out time for these practices.\n\n-In metacognition, it’s best to focus on the rationale for what works and strategies rather than content.\n-Content will change for each situation, strategies often remain similar\n-This is the kind of knowledge that that separates experts from pros\n-NPR and American Radioworks “Don’t Lecture Me”\n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • -Just a few reminders to end as you decide to work some of this into your classes:\n-Watch for overload. In DH, we have to be aware of the layer of technology, knowing that if we have students learning tools and content at the same time, one or the other may suffer without well-planned activities and classes.\n-As we mentioned, metacognition and results of many studies show that developing strategy is better than learning content for future work in a discipline. \n-We also know, maybe more than others, content is web-based. Why memorize when we can search?\n-A focus on strategy, plus a refuguring of the classroom as a lab, workshop, or studio, means that teachers aren’t the expert or the center - they are guides, consultants, leaders.\n
  • Cognitive Pedagogy

    1. 1. Cognitive PedagogyDitching the Lecture and Teaching for the BrainChristopher DickmanSaint Louis UniversityTHATCamp Pedagogy, Oct. 14, 2011 “Brain” by Dierk Schaefer under CC 2.0
    2. 2. The Disclaimers “Shut Your Brain Down” by toettoet under CC BY-NC 2.0
    3. 3. The DisclaimersEffective metaphors “Shut Your Brain Down” by toettoet under CC BY-NC 2.0
    4. 4. The DisclaimersEffective metaphorsExplanatory, not predictive “Shut Your Brain Down” by toettoet under CC BY-NC 2.0
    5. 5. The DisclaimersEffective metaphorsExplanatory, not predictiveStrategies, not rules “Shut Your Brain Down” by toettoet under CC BY-NC 2.0
    6. 6. The DisclaimersEffective metaphorsExplanatory, not predictiveStrategies, not rulesKnow when to fold ‘em “Shut Your Brain Down” by toettoet under CC BY-NC 2.0
    7. 7. The DisclaimersEffective metaphorsExplanatory, not predictiveStrategies, not rulesKnow when to fold ‘emIndividual Attention “Shut Your Brain Down” by toettoet under CC BY-NC 2.0
    8. 8. The Order Nautilus Pompilius by kibuyu under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
    9. 9. The Order1. Background Nautilus Pompilius by kibuyu under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
    10. 10. The Order1. Background2. Individual work (Active learning) Nautilus Pompilius by kibuyu under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
    11. 11. The Order1. Background2. Individual work (Active learning)3. Group discussion (Immediate feedback, Metacognition) Nautilus Pompilius by kibuyu under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
    12. 12. The Order1. Background2. Individual work (Active learning)3. Group discussion (Immediate feedback, Metacognition)4. Revision/Google Doc Nautilus Pompilius by kibuyu under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
    13. 13. The Order1. Background2. Individual work (Active learning)3. Group discussion (Immediate feedback, Metacognition)4. Revision/Google Doc5. Keynote! (Explicit Instruction) Nautilus Pompilius by kibuyu under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
    14. 14. The Order1. Background2. Individual work (Active learning)3. Group discussion (Immediate feedback, Metacognition)4. Revision/Google Doc5. Keynote! (Explicit Instruction)6. Rinse + Repeat Nautilus Pompilius by kibuyu under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
    15. 15. The Brain “Stone Brain” by Rebecca Lee under CC BY-SA 2.0
    16. 16. The BrainNeither a blank slate nor a template “Stone Brain” by Rebecca Lee under CC BY-SA 2.0
    17. 17. The BrainNeither a blank slate nor a templatePlastic “Stone Brain” by Rebecca Lee under CC BY-SA 2.0
    18. 18. The BrainNeither a blank slate nor a templatePlasticHas Working Memory and.... “Stone Brain” by Rebecca Lee under CC BY-SA 2.0
    19. 19. The BrainNeither a blank slate nor a templatePlasticHas Working Memory and....Long-Term Memory “Stone Brain” by Rebecca Lee under CC BY-SA 2.0
    20. 20. The BrainNeither a blank slate nor a templatePlasticHas Working Memory and....Long-Term MemoryLearning is about connections... “Stone Brain” by Rebecca Lee under CC BY-SA 2.0
    21. 21. The Connections “Synapse” by gasboyben under CC NC 2.0
    22. 22. The Connections“Cells that fire together wire together.” “Synapse” by gasboyben under CC NC 2.0
    23. 23. The Connections“Cells that fire together wire together.”Connect current activity/ideas to.... “Synapse” by gasboyben under CC NC 2.0
    24. 24. The Connections“Cells that fire together wire together.”Connect current activity/ideas to.... Long-Term Memory “Synapse” by gasboyben under CC NC 2.0
    25. 25. The Connections“Cells that fire together wire together.”Connect current activity/ideas to.... Long-Term Memory Personal Schemas “Synapse” by gasboyben under CC NC 2.0
    26. 26. The Connections“Cells that fire together wire together.”Connect current activity/ideas to.... Long-Term Memory Personal Schemas Learning methods “Synapse” by gasboyben under CC NC 2.0
    27. 27. The Connections“Cells that fire together wire together.”Connect current activity/ideas to.... Long-Term Memory Personal Schemas Learning methods Other people “Synapse” by gasboyben under CC NC 2.0
    28. 28. The Methods “drafting drafting drafting” by B Rosen under CC BY-ND 2.0
    29. 29. The MethodsActive Learning “drafting drafting drafting” by B Rosen under CC BY-ND 2.0
    30. 30. The MethodsActive LearningImmediate Feedback “drafting drafting drafting” by B Rosen under CC BY-ND 2.0
    31. 31. The MethodsActive LearningImmediate FeedbackMetacognition “drafting drafting drafting” by B Rosen under CC BY-ND 2.0
    32. 32. The MethodsActive LearningImmediate FeedbackMetacognitionWhat we’ll do in this workshop: •Hear about each •Brainstorm Application •Discuss our results “drafting drafting drafting” by B Rosen under CC BY-ND 2.0
    33. 33. Step One “Number One” by FreeFoto under CC BY-NC-ND 3.0
    34. 34. Step OneCreate a space to write down some notes “Number One” by FreeFoto under CC BY-NC-ND 3.0
    35. 35. Step OneCreate a space to write down some notesThink of an activity, lesson plan, or project foryour class Past, present, or future “Number One” by FreeFoto under CC BY-NC-ND 3.0
    36. 36. Step OneCreate a space to write down some notesThink of an activity, lesson plan, or project foryour class Past, present, or futureJot down some notes about your currentmethodologies “Number One” by FreeFoto under CC BY-NC-ND 3.0
    37. 37. Step Two “Bingo Number 2” by Leo Reynolds under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
    38. 38. Step TwoPartner up “Bingo Number 2” by Leo Reynolds under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
    39. 39. Step TwoPartner upBriefly discuss the activity you chose as wellas: “Bingo Number 2” by Leo Reynolds under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
    40. 40. Step TwoPartner upBriefly discuss the activity you chose as wellas: Its general goals “Bingo Number 2” by Leo Reynolds under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
    41. 41. Step TwoPartner upBriefly discuss the activity you chose as wellas: Its general goals Your methods “Bingo Number 2” by Leo Reynolds under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
    42. 42. Active Learning “Day 37 - Playing Piano” by Mourner under CC BY-NC 2.0
    43. 43. Active Learning The brain likes activity, experimentation, and play (ABL, PBL) “Day 37 - Playing Piano” by Mourner under CC BY-NC 2.0
    44. 44. Active Learning The brain likes activity, experimentation, and play (ABL, PBL) Dual-Coding Theory “Day 37 - Playing Piano” by Mourner under CC BY-NC 2.0
    45. 45. Active Learning The brain likes activity, experimentation, and play (ABL, PBL) Dual-Coding Theory Learning from mistakes and revising “Day 37 - Playing Piano” by Mourner under CC BY-NC 2.0
    46. 46. Active Learning The brain likes activity, experimentation, and play (ABL, PBL) Dual-Coding Theory Learning from mistakes and revising From Storage/Schema to Processor/ Environment “Day 37 - Playing Piano” by Mourner under CC BY-NC 2.0
    47. 47. Active Learning The brain likes activity, experimentation, and play (ABL, PBL) Dual-Coding Theory Learning from mistakes and revising From Storage/Schema to Processor/ Environment Manifestations: workshops, labs, studios “Day 37 - Playing Piano” by Mourner under CC BY-NC 2.0
    48. 48. Step Three “Number 3” by Leo Reynolds under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
    49. 49. Step ThreeDiscuss with partner how you might/dointroduce active learning into your activity “Number 3” by Leo Reynolds under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
    50. 50. Step ThreeDiscuss with partner how you might/dointroduce active learning into your activityDiscuss tools you might use to facilitate thisin-class or online, add it to the GDoc “Number 3” by Leo Reynolds under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
    51. 51. Step ThreeDiscuss with partner how you might/dointroduce active learning into your activityDiscuss tools you might use to facilitate thisin-class or online, add it to the GDocJot down some notes for your own activity “Number 3” by Leo Reynolds under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
    52. 52. Immediate Feedback “Social Network Profiles in Mind” by Hank Groebe under CC BY-NC 2.0
    53. 53. Immediate FeedbackWhy we get so good at video games “Social Network Profiles in Mind” by Hank Groebe under CC BY-NC 2.0
    54. 54. Immediate FeedbackWhy we get so good at video gamesHelps neurons wire together “Social Network Profiles in Mind” by Hank Groebe under CC BY-NC 2.0
    55. 55. Immediate FeedbackWhy we get so good at video gamesHelps neurons wire togetherTime lost is opportunity lost “Social Network Profiles in Mind” by Hank Groebe under CC BY-NC 2.0
    56. 56. Immediate FeedbackWhy we get so good at video gamesHelps neurons wire togetherTime lost is opportunity lostSocial beings, social learning “Social Network Profiles in Mind” by Hank Groebe under CC BY-NC 2.0
    57. 57. Immediate FeedbackWhy we get so good at video gamesHelps neurons wire togetherTime lost is opportunity lostSocial beings, social learningManifestations: Conferencing, one-on-one, peer review “Social Network Profiles in Mind” by Hank Groebe under CC BY-NC 2.0
    58. 58. Step Four “Number - 4” by szczel under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
    59. 59. Step FourDiscuss with your partner how you mightintroduce immediate feedback into youractivity “Number - 4” by szczel under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
    60. 60. Step FourDiscuss with your partner how you mightintroduce immediate feedback into youractivityDiscuss tools you might use to facilitate thisin-class or online, add them to GDoc “Number - 4” by szczel under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
    61. 61. Step FourDiscuss with your partner how you mightintroduce immediate feedback into youractivityDiscuss tools you might use to facilitate thisin-class or online, add them to GDocJot down some notes for your own activity “Number - 4” by szczel under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
    62. 62. Metacognition “Brainstorming Organisering” by NTNU Engineering Science and Technology under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)
    63. 63. MetacognitionConnect and correct “Brainstorming Organisering” by NTNU Engineering Science and Technology under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)
    64. 64. MetacognitionConnect and correctMake work visible “Brainstorming Organisering” by NTNU Engineering Science and Technology under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)
    65. 65. MetacognitionConnect and correctMake work visiblePut it in contrast “Brainstorming Organisering” by NTNU Engineering Science and Technology under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)
    66. 66. MetacognitionConnect and correctMake work visiblePut it in contrastPeer editing, public work “Brainstorming Organisering” by NTNU Engineering Science and Technology under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)
    67. 67. MetacognitionConnect and correctMake work visiblePut it in contrastPeer editing, public workEvaluate and Reflect “Brainstorming Organisering” by NTNU Engineering Science and Technology under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)
    68. 68. MetacognitionConnect and correctMake work visiblePut it in contrastPeer editing, public workEvaluate and ReflectFocus on rationale and strategy “Brainstorming Organisering” by NTNU Engineering Science and Technology under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)
    69. 69. MetacognitionConnect and correctMake work visiblePut it in contrastPeer editing, public workEvaluate and ReflectFocus on rationale and strategyManifestations - Forums, journals, blogs, “Brainstorming Organisering” by NTNU Engineering Science and Technology under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)
    70. 70. Step Five “5” by svenwerk under CC NA-ND 2.0
    71. 71. Step FiveDiscuss with your partner how you mightintroduce metacognition into your activity “5” by svenwerk under CC NA-ND 2.0
    72. 72. Step FiveDiscuss with your partner how you mightintroduce metacognition into your activityDiscuss tools you might use to facilitate thisin-class or online, add them to GDoc “5” by svenwerk under CC NA-ND 2.0
    73. 73. Step FiveDiscuss with your partner how you mightintroduce metacognition into your activityDiscuss tools you might use to facilitate thisin-class or online, add them to GDocJot down some notes for your own activity “5” by svenwerk under CC NA-ND 2.0
    74. 74. Keep in Mind.... “Boatwright Computer Classroom” by Boatwright Memorial Library under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
    75. 75. Keep in Mind.... Working Memory Overload Goals of Teaching Content v. Strategy Role of the Teacher Expert v. Consultant/Guide “Boatwright Computer Classroom” by Boatwright Memorial Library under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

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