Sociale media en de Europese Unie

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Presentatie op 6 juni 2012 aan studievereniging Sirius van de Universiteit Twente over de relatie tussen sociale media en de Europese Unie.

Presentatie op 6 juni 2012 aan studievereniging Sirius van de Universiteit Twente over de relatie tussen sociale media en de Europese Unie.

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  • Lucas Hartong – PVV Gerben-Jan Gerbrandy – D66 Corien Wortmann-Kool – CDA Kartika Liotard – Onafhankelijk, eerder SP
  • Ja: Austria, Estonia. Finland, Malta, Slovenia, Slovakia. Nee: Czech republic, Hungary, Lithuania, Latvia, Romania

Transcript

  • 1. Social media and the European Union: a solution for a disengaged citizenry? Chris Aalberts www.chrisaalberts.nlSocial media and the EU
  • 2. Who am I? • Researcher and lecturer in political communication Four books in Dutch: • Veel gekwetter, weinig wol (2011) • U draait en u bent niet eerlijk (2010) • Altijd ver weg? (2008) • Aantrekkelijke politiek? (2006) www.chrisaalberts.nlSocial media and the EU
  • 3. Short quiz www.chrisaalberts.nlSocial media and the EU
  • 4. Who are these people? www.chrisaalberts.nlSocial media and the EU
  • 5. Which countries have the Euro? • Austria • Czech Republic • Estonia • Finland • Hungary • Lithuania • Latvia • Malta • Slovenia • Slovakia • Romania www.chrisaalberts.nlSocial media and the EU
  • 6. Who decides on railway privatisation? • European Union – The council – European Parliament • Countries • Regions • Local authorities • Railway companies themselves www.chrisaalberts.nlSocial media and the EU
  • 7. Informed citizenship • Which decisions are made? • Who made those decisions? • For what reasons? • What were the effects of those decisions? • What were the differences between political parties? • How do local, regional, national and European government interact? www.chrisaalberts.nlSocial media and the EU
  • 8. Normative views • Diverse ideas about the rights and obligations of citizens in modern democracy – Direct democracy – Deliberative democracy – Participative democracy – Informed citizenship • These ideals are not realistic for a majority of the citizenry www.chrisaalberts.nlSocial media and the EU
  • 9. Everyday life • Politics does not play an important role • Citizens spend their time on other activities • Several indicators show this – Political knowledge – Political interest – Political participation • Normative views are highly theoretical www.chrisaalberts.nlSocial media and the EU
  • 10. Audience democracy • Citizens perceive a large distance between themselves and politicians • Citizens are largely inactive, they vote in elections • Citizens follow politics in the media • Citizens vote for parties they agree with • Citizens vote against governing parties if they disagree with their policies • Citizens are the audience of politicians • Empirical approach, not meant to be normative www.chrisaalberts.nlSocial media and the EU
  • 11. Monitorial citizenship • Citizens are largely uninformed about politics • Citizens will look after their own interests • Citizens are only interested in some political topics • Other topics are unimportant to them • Citizens possess an ‘antenna’ • Citizens receive signals that something is wrong • In these cases, they can become active www.chrisaalberts.nlSocial media and the EU
  • 12. Metaphor www.chrisaalberts.nlSocial media and the EU
  • 13. The European audience • No political knowledge • No political interest • No political activities www.chrisaalberts.nlSocial media and the EU
  • 14. Monitoring Europe But there is monitorial citizenship in Europe •Two locations of the European Parliament •Referendums on European treaties •ACTA-treaty on intellectual property rights •Situation in Greece This seems to be unsatifactory www.chrisaalberts.nlSocial media and the EU
  • 15. Five solutions • More engagement is seen as needed • How can we stimulate this? • School • Political leadership • Interactive policy making • Traditional media • Social media www.chrisaalberts.nlSocial media and the EU
  • 16. Expectation • Social media attract citizens to the European Union Combination of four ideas: • Social media educate citizens, just as schools do • Leaders can show their political leadership • Citizens have more influence through social media • Journalists find interesting stories online • YouTube: Marietje Schaake www.chrisaalberts.nlSocial media and the EU
  • 17. Education When schools teach about the Europe Union, this leads to more engagement www.chrisaalberts.nlSocial media and the EU
  • 18. Education • Large budgets for school activities • Industry of school projects on Europe • Europe is a secondary topic • Not enough time for national governments www.chrisaalberts.nlSocial media and the EU
  • 19. Education Misunderstanding about two types of media •Pull medium: demand of the audience is central •Push medium: offer of the medium is central •When citizens do not demand EU information, there will be no education Social media do not change this www.chrisaalberts.nlSocial media and the EU
  • 20. Leadership Stronger leaders tell citizens that Europe is important www.chrisaalberts.nlSocial media and the EU
  • 21. Leadership • No important European leaders or positions • Creation of the ‘European president’ • Not an important figure for public opinion • An opinionated president would possibly lead to more resistance against the EU www.chrisaalberts.nlSocial media and the EU
  • 22. Leadership Misunderstanding about political leadership •Politicians become famous through traditional media •Policial leadership is largely based on political views •Many politicians lack clear views on Europe, except some extreme, anti-European examples Social media do not play a role in both steps www.chrisaalberts.nlSocial media and the EU
  • 23. Citizen influence Citizens should have a say in European policies www.chrisaalberts.nlSocial media and the EU
  • 24. Citizen influence • Not many examples • Most important one: the European citizens’ initiative • Research shows that support is not always the outcome of interactive policy making • Projects are viable when citizens can have a real influence • Influence on a European level is unlikely www.chrisaalberts.nlSocial media and the EU
  • 25. Citizen influence Misunderstanding about citizen influence •Citizens do not become engaged because there are options for conversation, influence, etc. •Emotional issues are needed •Citizens need knowledge about policies and procedures to be effective •They lack this knowledge Social media cannot change this www.chrisaalberts.nlSocial media and the EU
  • 26. Traditional media Media should spend more time on the EU www.chrisaalberts.nlSocial media and the EU
  • 27. Traditional media • EU institutions have large media budgets • Many types of help for journalists • Journalists follow the citizens’ agenda • As long as Europe is not part of that agenda… www.chrisaalberts.nlSocial media and the EU
  • 28. Traditional media Misunderstanding about journalism •Some journalists might be lazy •But audience demand is still essential •Social media could push certain issues •But journalists will still ask themselves about the relevance for their audiences •Social media cannot change these decisions www.chrisaalberts.nlSocial media and the EU
  • 29. Conclusion Social media do not change social structures •Citizen interest in the EU stays the same •Behavior of politicians stays the same •Journalists still work in identical ways •Citizen influence remains sparse Social media do not bring anything new •Reproduction of older patterns www.chrisaalberts.nlSocial media and the EU