CCW conference: Stormwater Financing Economic Impact Assessment

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Dan Nees, Environmental Finance Center
This presentation will provide results of an economic impact study conducted by the Environmental Finance Center at the University of Maryland, College Park in partnership with the Business Economic and Outreach Network (BEACON) at Salisbury University. The study assessed the anticipated economic impact of urban stormwater management investments, focusing specifically on the local impact of practices required as part of the federally mandated Chesapeake Bay restoration effort. The study was conducted as part of a local stormwater financing project led by EFC with the support of the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation.

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  • Enables decision-makers to consider stormwater financing within the framework of broader community priorities:
  • CCW conference: Stormwater Financing Economic Impact Assessment

    1. 1. Stormwater FinancingEconomic Impact AssessmentPresented by Dan NeesChoose Clean Water ConferenceJune 5, 2013
    2. 2. Stormwater FinancingEconomic Impact AssessmentPresented by Dan NeesLand, Air, Water, and Animals Allocation and Distribution ofFiscal Resources Principal Place (LAWAADFRPP)Choose Clean Water ConferenceJune 5, 2013
    3. 3. Stormwater FinancingEconomic Impact AssessmentPresented by Dan NeesEnvironmental Finance Center (EFC)Choose Clean Water ConferenceJune 5, 2013
    4. 4. Discussion Points• Provide brief overview of stormwater financingenvironment• Define and explain economic impact analysis (EIA)• Summarize EFC stormwater EIA project• Discuss role of EIA in broader education and outreachefforts
    5. 5. Overview of Stormwater Financing• There has been a fundamental shift in approach tofinancing:Push for impracticability Desire for efficient solutions
    6. 6. Overview of Stormwater Financing• There has been a fundamental shift in approach tofinancing:Push for impracticability Desire for efficient solutions
    7. 7. AgricultureWastewaterStormwaterIndividualCommunityInstitutionImplementation Shift
    8. 8. Implementation Shift
    9. 9. Implementation Shift
    10. 10. City of BaltimoreStormwater financing in context:• Population: 621,000• Median household income: $40K (state avg: $72.4K)*• Citizens below poverty line: 22% (state avg: 9%)**• Percent of community lacking basic literacy skills: 16%(state avg: 11%)***The impact that stormwater financing has matters…*United States Census Bureau**United States Census Bureau***U.S. Department of Education
    11. 11. Economic Impact Assessments• Economic impact analysis (EIA) examines the effect of apolicy or activity—such as water quality restoration orstormwater financing—on the economy of a given area
    12. 12. EIA: Why Do We Care?Frames the issue within acommunity context:Economic developmentJob trainingInfrastructure financing
    13. 13. Estimated Economic Impact ofConstruction Activities: Value Added• Based on $100 million investment
    14. 14. Estimated Economic Impact ofConstruction Activities: Jobs Supported• Based on $100 million investment
    15. 15. Estimated Economic Impact of Operationsand Maintenance Activities: Value Added• Based on $10 million annual investment
    16. 16. Estimated Economic Impact of Operationsand Maintenance Activities: Jobs Supported• Based on $10 million annual investment
    17. 17. Education and Outreach• EIAs identify industry “winners” in the system
    18. 18. Impacts on Industry Sectors
    19. 19. BusinessesProductDevelopmentManufacturing/DistributionSite Design• Civil Engineering• Landscape Architecture• Hydrologic/Hydraulic Engineering• Environmental Engineering• Landscape Media• Construction Equipment• Plumbing Equipment & Supplies• Building Supplies• Farm & Garden Machinery & Equipment• Nurseries and Horticultural Services• Arborist Services• Cistern Manufacturers• Meters Sensors and Components Manufacturers• Landscape Architecture• Architecture Firms• Planning and Expediting Services• Civil Engineering Services• Hydrology• Permitting and Administrative Services• Soil Scientist ServicesSource: Gray to Green: Jumpstarting Private Investment in Green Stormwater Infrastructure (Philadelphia SBN’s GreenEconomy Task Force)
    20. 20. BusinessesConstructionMonitoring/Maintenance• General Construction Services• Paving, Surfacing and Tamping Services• Roof Contracting Services• Landscaping Services• Poured Concrete Foundation & Structure Contracting Services• Site Management and Evaluation Plumbing Services• Electrical Services• Hauling Services• Truck and Tractor Operations• Weatherization Companies• Demolition/Deconstruction• Hazardous Waste Treatment and Disposal Services• Service Technician Firms• Landscaping• Compliance Testing and Monitoring• Septic Tank Servicers and Sewer Pipe Cleaning• Plumbing/Sprinklers/Irrigation• Jetvac Cleaning Services• Erosion and Sediment InspectionSource: Gray to Green: Jumpstarting Private Investment in Green Stormwater Infrastructure (Philadelphia SBN’s GreenEconomy Task Force)
    21. 21. OccupationsProductDevelopmentManufacturing/DistributionSite Design• Civil Engineers• Landscape Architects• Environmental Engineering Technicians• Machinists• Welders, Cutters, and Welder Fitters• Soil and Plant Scientists• Environmental Engineers• Hydrologists• Nursery & Greenhouse Managers (includes Horticulturists)Source: Pennsylvania Department of Labor and Industry, Labor Market Information System. https://paworkstats.geosolinc.com/
    22. 22. Construction• First-line Supervisors of Construction Trades and Extraction Workers:$25.87 - $46.18• Cement Masons & Concrete Finishers: $19.21- $24.96• Construction Laborers: $15.52 – $24.58• Plumbers: $22.81-$34.80• Roofers: $17.11 - $24.87• Paving, Surfacing and Tamping Equipment Operators: $21.45- $36.61OccupationsMonitoring/Maintenance• Supervisors of Landscaping and Groundskeeping Workers• Landscaping and Groundskeeping Workers• Maintenance and Repair Workers, General• Water and Wastewater Treatment Plant and System Operators• Septic Tank Servicers and Sewer Pipe CleanersSource: Pennsylvania Department of Labor and Industry, Labor Market Information System. https://paworkstats.geosolinc.com/Hourly Wage Range reflects 2011 data for Philadelphia County.
    23. 23. Education and Outreach• EIA identify industry “winners” in the system• Make the “winners” advocates
    24. 24. Education and Outreach• EIA identify industry “winners” in the system• Make the “winners” advocates• Context in the community matters• Impact on the community matters• Value to the community matters
    25. 25. CONCLUSIONDan Nees, Senior Research AssociateEnvironmental Finance Centerwww.efc.umd.edudnees@umd.edu

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