UPDATE
Delaware’s role in restoring 
the Chesapeake Bay 
and our waterways
Where does Bay pollution come from? 
Source: EPA
Delaware is an “effective” polluter of the Chesapeake Bay 
Impact of red areas on Bay water quality at least 10 times high...
What’s in Delaware’s plan?
Our strategy for meeting the EPA’s required reductions for Nitrogen, Phosphorous and Sediment b...
Wastewater 
Major treatment plants include Bridgeville, Laurel, Seaford and Invista
Operating at or below current permitte...
Onsite Wastewater
DNREC developing new inspection requirements and  performance standards to meet TMDLs in statewide regul...
Stormwater
Revision of state Sediment and Stormwater regulations – emphasize green technologies, possible in-lieu fee to p...
Land Use 
Use state project reviews and comprehensive planning process to proactively direct growth – especially in Nantic...
Land Use - Offsets 
Other Chesapeake states have developed programs for creating and trading nutrient credits 
We must dev...
Agriculture 
Revised Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations (CAFO) regulations take effect in November
240 out of 372 CAFO...
Agriculture 
Established aggressive goals for implementation of ag best management practices (tree planting, forest and gr...
Restoration 
Partners include private landowners, DelDOT, Delaware Forest Service and Natural Resource Conservation Servic...
Public Lands 
The state manages almost 40,000 acres in the watershed
State and federal stewards will lead by example 
Revi...
Discussion 
For more information, go to website:
http://www.wr.dnrec.delaware.gov/Information/Pages/Chesapeake_WIP.aspx
Je...
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Bunting howart

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TMDL Delaware WIP Presentation

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Bunting howart

  1. 1. UPDATE Delaware’s role in restoring the Chesapeake Bay and our waterways
  2. 2. Where does Bay pollution come from? Source: EPA
  3. 3. Delaware is an “effective” polluter of the Chesapeake Bay Impact of red areas on Bay water quality at least 10 times higher than blue areas
  4. 4. What’s in Delaware’s plan? Our strategy for meeting the EPA’s required reductions for Nitrogen, Phosphorous and Sediment by 2025 is to focus on these areas: Wastewater Onsite wastewater (community systems & septic) Stormwater Land use Agriculture Restoration Public lands Strategies developed by interagency workgroups
  5. 5. Wastewater Major treatment plants include Bridgeville, Laurel, Seaford and Invista Operating at or below current permitted capacity Phase I WIP recommends modified permits for all significant facilities Future growth may trigger need for additional upgrades Laurel Wastewater Treatment Plant Upgrade - 2007
  6. 6. Onsite Wastewater DNREC developing new inspection requirements and performance standards to meet TMDLs in statewide regulations Proposed advanced treatment for all systems within 1,000 feet of Chesapeake tidal waters and wetlands to be implemented as systems fail (2017 milestone) Eliminate a minimum of 6,074 systems in this watershed by 2025 as sewer districts expand.
  7. 7. Stormwater Revision of state Sediment and Stormwater regulations – emphasize green technologies, possible in-lieu fee to partially offset new development (2011) Many best management practices are not included in EPA’s model – difficult to accurately measure reductions Update Industrial Stormwater regulations (2012) Renewal of DelDOT/New Castle County municipal stormwater permit (MS4) – only such permit in watershed at this time (2013) Stormwater retrofits in older urban areas will be minimal because area is very rural – not cost-effective (EPA had wanted more)
  8. 8. Land Use Use state project reviews and comprehensive planning process to proactively direct growth – especially in Nanticoke corridor (Bridgeville-Seaford-Laurel) Reduce fertilizer use on developed lands UD completing analysis of watershed to map growth through 2025
  9. 9. Land Use - Offsets Other Chesapeake states have developed programs for creating and trading nutrient credits We must develop plan for offsetting future growth (2012) – Many technical, regulatory and policy challenges will need to be resolved Blend offset program for nutrients (quality) and stormwater volume (quantity) Can benefit both development and ag communities We are improving tool for determining and tracking impacts of land use changes on pollution Offset/trading workshop planned for spring 2011
  10. 10. Agriculture Revised Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations (CAFO) regulations take effect in November 240 out of 372 CAFOs are in Chesapeake State nutrient management regulations also will be updated Increase volume of manure relocated out of watershed or sent to alternative use facilities Perdue pellets
  11. 11. Agriculture Established aggressive goals for implementation of ag best management practices (tree planting, forest and grass buffers, grazing and tillage practices They are most cost-effective way to meet water quality goals Improve collection of data on voluntary practices not part of cost-share programs – e.g., Amish
  12. 12. Restoration Partners include private landowners, DelDOT, Delaware Forest Service and Natural Resource Conservation Service Restoring headwater forests, channelized streams, and creating stream and wetland buffers will improve water quality Gaps in data, funding and outreach exist
  13. 13. Public Lands The state manages almost 40,000 acres in the watershed State and federal stewards will lead by example Review opportunities for new Best Management Practices, reforestation Funding a challenge
  14. 14. Discussion For more information, go to website: http://www.wr.dnrec.delaware.gov/Information/Pages/Chesapeake_WIP.aspx Jennifer Walls Jennifer.walls@state.de.us

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