Corning Roundtable

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Corning Roundtable

  1. 1. Teaching and Learning for the 21st century
  2. 2. Agenda 8:00 - 9:30 9:45 - 11:15 11:15 - 12:45 12:45 - 3:15 (break as needed) Session 1 Session 2 Lunch Session 3
  3. 3. Comments Questions?? Ah- Ha Concerns
  4. 4. MYP: 2014 Changes to subject groups Current MYP Mathematics Language A MYP (first teaching) September 2014 Language and literature Mathematics Arts Language B Language acquisition Arts Sciences Personal Project Technology Physical Education Individuals and societies Design Physical and health education Sciences MYP projects Interdisciplinary Humanities
  5. 5. Speed Dial Questions Player 1 Player 2 Player 3 Player 4 Player 5
  6. 6. Day 1 Objectives • Inquire into 21st century teaching and learning practices • Develop and practice understanding of concept-based learning • Inquire into the design of a MYP Unit Planner for 2014 and beyond
  7. 7. Dead Poet’s Society Break into 3 even groups (by looking to see what group needs more or less people) and choose a sense (see, feel, hear) Watch the video clip Each sensory group notes on a piece of paper with a T-Chart what they inferred (traditional/21st century) from the clip using their sense as a filter. Share out your findings
  8. 8. Traditional 21st Century
  9. 9. From the Agriculture Age to the Conceptual Age Agricultural Age (farmers) 18th century Industrial Age (factory workers) 19th century ASCD Allen Parish 2010; Rye and Herold Information Age (knowledge worker) 20th century Conceptual Age (creators and empathizers) 21st century
  10. 10. Step-by-Step MYP unit planning 1. Begin with the unit you are revising for teaching Spring 2014 2. Choose drop down MYP Year (1 - 5) 3. Type in # of hours (60 min hours.....) 10
  11. 11. POWER
  12. 12. POWER
  13. 13. POWER
  14. 14. POWER
  15. 15. POWER
  16. 16. POWER
  17. 17. How does it stack up? • Use the Harvard video for data points to inquire further into... 1.Why might concept-based learning be considered by some to be a powerful way to learn? 2.How and why might that approach have affected the Harvard graduates? 3.What key concept might have anchored the “weather” learning
  18. 18. Choose 1 for your unit! Key concepts Aesthetics Change Connections Creativity Culture Development Form Global interactions Identity Logic Relationships Time, place and space Systems Perspective Communication Communities
  19. 19. REFLECTION • Visible Thinking Strategy • (Harvard Project Zero) • On a sticky note, as a “break exit ticket”, write your reflection on the learning in Session 1 and post on the comments section of the issues bin: • I used to think……… • Now I think…………..
  20. 20. break
  21. 21. Related Concepts While the KEY concepts provide breadth, the RELATED concepts provide depth and focus Students are pointed towards full conceptual understanding through the related concepts that emerge from the discipline There are 12 prescribed related concepts for each discipline within a subject group. These all should be used over the course of the five years in your discipline. (Not necessarily EACH year)
  22. 22. Choose 2 for your unit
  23. 23. Merging key and related concepts Communication Purpose Audience Imperatives Purposeful communication enhances audience engagement. Conceptual Understanding
  24. 24. Global Contexts • Provide a context for the inquiry at hand • Only choose one: Natural flow with the conceptual understanding.
  25. 25. Global Contexts • Identities and relationships • Orientation in time and space • Personal and cultural expression • Scientific and technical innovation • Globalization and sustainability • Fairness and development
  26. 26. Consider what global context a student might explore in this photo
  27. 27. Global Contexts • Identities and relationships • Orientation in time and space • Personal and cultural expression • Scientific and technical innovation • Globalization and sustainability • Fairness and development
  28. 28. Statement of Inquiry 1 Key Concept + 2 Related Concepts + 1 Global Context = Statement of Inquiry 34 Tips: Use active, present tense verbs •Avoid proper & personal nouns & pronouns •Avoid forms of the verb ‘to be’
  29. 29. Creating the Statement of Inquiry Choose ONE key concept from the chart Choose 2 related concepts Conceptual Understanding + Global Context = Statement of Inquiry
  30. 30. An Example from Language and Literature Key concept: Communication Related concepts: Purpose, Audience Imperatives Global Context: Personal and Cultural Expression (analysis & argument) Statement of Inquiry Purposeful communication using analysis and argument enhances audience engagement.
  31. 31. Statement of Inquiry Guides the inquiry of the unit Provides the resource for inquiry questions Links the conceptual learning directly to the authentic assessment Represents a contextualized, conceptual understanding Describes a complex relationship that is worthy of inquiry Explains clearly what students should understand and why that understanding is meaningful Unpacked through a series of inquiry questions
  32. 32. Reflect Choose one practice from C3 (Teaching and Learning), and consider how the statement of inquiry would drive at least one of these practices from the IB Standards & Practices.
  33. 33. C3 – Teaching and Learning: 2. Engages students as inquirers and thinkers. 3. Builds on what students know and can do. 5. Supports students to become actively responsible for their own learning. 13. Engages students in reflecting on how, what and why they are learning. 15. Encourages students to demonstrate their learning in a variety of ways.
  34. 34. lunch
  35. 35. Constructing Inquiry Questions
  36. 36. •The inquiry questions encourage looking at the statement of inquiry Develop inquiry questions through multiple perspectives. •We want to lead students from academic knowledge to thoughtful action, helping them to develop positive attitudes and a sense of personal and social responsibility.
  37. 37. Students will investigate what an author does to create a compelling character How important are multiple points of view to arrive at an understanding? Statement of Inquiry What constitutes character? What makes communication ethical?
  38. 38. Process of developing inquiry questions... • What will students need to look into in terms of concept/content to adequately wrestle with the statement of inquiry? Students will . . . (choose one): • Explore • Discover • Inquire into “Lines of • Seek Inquiry” begin • Search the • process...and Investigate begin with • Examine Students will + Inquiry Verb
  39. 39. •Students will begin to analyze how they will engage with their student audience in order to open minds to future possibilities by means of a well thought out argument. •Students will investigate how to make their communication with their audience purposeful and motivational. •Students will purposefully explore their academic choices with respect to their options following graduation.
  40. 40. Develop inquiry questions To turn each of these “lines of inquiry” into questions: Remove the content Keep the concept! Allow for multiple perspectives and answers Factual - may start with “what” and can be looked up Conceptual - may start with “how/why” and should not lead students to a specific answer Debatable - make it provocative where there are at least two sides to the issue at hand
  41. 41. Creating the Questions.... •Students will begin to analyze how they will engage with their student audience in order to open minds to future possibilities by means of a well thought out argument. Factual: What engages audiences? •Students will investigate how to make their communication with their audience purposeful and motivational. Conceptual: How do I use language to communicate? •Students will purposefully explore their academic choices with respect to their options following graduation. Debatable: How do the choices I purposefully make now affect my tomorrow?
  42. 42. Students will investigate what an author does to create a compelling character How important are multiple points of view to arrive at an understanding? Statement of Inquiry What constitutes character? What makes communication ethical?
  43. 43. Table Group Share • Each person at the table reads aloud the following without any explanation and dialogue of their own: • key concept • related concepts • statement of inquiry • Inquiry questions
  44. 44. • write 3 things learned all on one sticky note • 2 new questions... one per sticky note, • 1 ah- ha on one sticky note
  45. 45. Agenda 8:00 - 9:30 9:45 - 11:15 11:15 - 12:15 12:15 - 3:00 (break as needed) Session 4 Session 5 Lunch Session 6
  46. 46. Day 2 Objectives • Inquire into 21st century teaching and learning practices • Develop and practice understanding of concept-based learning • Inquire into the evolution of the MYP Unit Planning Process for 2014 and beyond
  47. 47. REAL World Experience What is a real life experience that you’ve recently had that you learned something from?
  48. 48. Key research findings “Authentic tasks increase student motivation to learn.” — Stipek (2002) “Student’s beliefs about real-world significance of what they are learning were a strong predictor of their interest and enjoyment of math class.” — Mitchell (1993) “Students give highest interest ratings to classes that make them think hard and require them to participate actively in thinking and learning.” — Newmann (1992) 55
  49. 49. Creating, Revising or Rethinking • What do you think your summative assessment is? should be? or could be? • How is what you are thinking about asking students to do, something that is authentic in order to show what they know?
  50. 50. Grasps  Goal  Role  Audience  Situation  Product, Performance, and Purpose  Standards and Criteria for success Wiggins & McTighe 2005
  51. 51. Example from our unit planner (G) The goal is to show an understanding of how purposeful communication uses analysis and argument to enhance audience engagement. (R) You are a presenter at a TED talk with a student audience. (A) You need to convince each student in the audience to pursue the most rigorous course of study possible during their high school years. (S) The challenge involves dealing with students and parents who think the basic NY State requirements are good enough. (P) You will create a multi-media presentation in order to convince students and parents that the most rigorous coursework opens a variety of opportunities following graduation. (S) Your performance needs to be at least 10 minutes long, involve at least two different digital media tools, systematically outline how academic choices influence their future, and must allow for appropriate interaction with the audience.
  52. 52. Now you try it . . . Create a summative assessment task that asks for a performance of understanding. Set it in a real world context Use the GRASPS process to help design your assessment. Consider what we already know about authentic assessment and 21st Century skills as we work through our design
  53. 53. Standards for Success • Success. (This is not the place to use ONLY MYP criteria, but also CCSS and criteria for what the teacher would like in terms of their own expectations) • Your performance needs to _____________ • Your work will be judged by _____________ • Your product must meet the following standards ______________
  54. 54. Does the Task allow students to perform at the high end of the rubric? Achievement Levels 0 1-2 3-4 5-6 7-8 Descriptors
  55. 55. Gallery Walk
  56. 56. REFLECTION • What might the school experience be like for students when units of work are grounded by an authentic assessment task(s)?”
  57. 57. The Inquiry Cycle Action The HOW! Inquiry Reflection
  58. 58. Inquiry Cycle Investigation For inquiry: “HOW does the task allow students to inquire into the topic and show a deeper understanding of the statement of inquiry?” • • For action: “HOW does inquiry within the task promote action or the possibility for action?” • For reflection: “HOW does inquiry within the task present the opportunity for reflection?” • In table groups share out findings. Your thinking will be recorded on chart paper, one for each part of the inquiry cycle… Inquiry/Action/Reflection?
  59. 59. Objectives and Assessment Criteria Represent the structure of knowledge and encompass 4 dimensions: Factual Conceptual Procedural Metacognitive The MYP objectives and their strands provided in each subject guide for years 1,3, 5 their use is mandatory at least twice each year whenever a summative task is assessed
  60. 60. I OBJECT! Criterion A – Analysing (Yr. 5) Analyze the effects of the creator’s choices on an audience Criterion B – Organizing (Yr.5) Organize opinions and ideas in a sustained, coherent and logical manner Use referencing and formatting tools to create a presentation style suitable to the context and intention.
  61. 61. lunch
  62. 62. How are you feeling????
  63. 63. Approaches to Learning - ATL ATL is concerned with: •intellectual disciplines, attitudes, strategies and skills “learning how to learn” • awareness of thought processes and their strategic use ATL results in: • critical, coherent and independent thinking • capacity for problem solving and decision making ATL is a shared responsibility: • core of all curriculum development and all teaching • logical progression over time.
  64. 64. Skills A skill is the learned capacity to carry out pre-determined results and/or the ability to choose and perform the right technique at the right time, effectively and efficiently. Take Note: • Skills need to be both implicitly and explicitly developed • Almost any skill could potentially be explored in a given unit, so it is important to be strategic regarding what skill is most important for what units.
  65. 65. ATL skill categories MYP skill clusters Communication Communication Social Collaboration Self management Organization Affective Reflection Research Information literacy Media literacy Thinking Critical thinking Creative thinking Transfer
  66. 66. Consider Prior Knowledge • How do I know what skills have been taught before? • What is my justification for teaching this skill?
  67. 67. Consider . . . What cognitive skill or affective skills are actually inherent in the objective strand you have chosen? Communication Social Self Management Research Thinking Ask: In order to master this objective strand, what skill or skills will the student be expected to demonstrate? The corresponding achievement levels determine the level of mastery (achievement) of those skills.
  68. 68. ….with an objective strand…. • C (Communicating) (Yr 1) Use appropriate mathematical language (notation, symbols, terminology) in both oral and written statements In order for students to [strand:] use appropriate mathematical language (symbols, terminology) in both oral and written statements students must [skill:] comprehend and use language with accuracy, clarity, and discernment (ATL Category: Thinking, Skill Cluster: Critical Thinking)
  69. 69. Language and Literature ¥ In order for students to analyze the effects of the creator’s choices on an audience students must gather and organize relevant information to formulate an argument. (ATL Category: Thinking, ATL Cluster: Critical Thinking). ¥ In order for students to organize opinions and ideas in a sustained, coherent and logical manner students must structure information in summaries, essays and reports (ATL Category: Communication, ATL Cluster: Communication) ¥ In order for students to use referencing and formatting tools to create a presentation style suitable to the context and intention students must communicate information and ideas effectively to multiple audiences using a variety of media and formats. (ATL Category: Research, ATL Cluster: Media literacy)
  70. 70. Your turn! Choose an objective strand for your unit and make sure it is the appropriate year Look at the ATL Skill Categories and choose the most likely Category based on the strand Look at the ATL Skill Cluster(s) within the Category and choose the most likely Skill Cluster Choose a skill Preface the strand with “in order to” and end the strand with students must.....by identifying discrete skill(s) using the ATL skill chart to be taught.
  71. 71. ATL and Authentic Assessment When considering all skills: Don’t forget to analyze the process of completing the task from the student’s point of view What strategies and skills might be needed for students to succeed with this task? Add a skill or two should you want to teach that explicitly. Use the chosen objective strands to make informed decisions about what ATL skills to discretely teach. You might use the CCSS to also inform choice of skills.
  72. 72. Making “Task Specific Clarifications”.... Achievement Levels 1-2 3-4 5-6 7-8 Descriptors
  73. 73. “Examine the words in the strand(s)” • When there are words such as a “wide range” it is appropriate to say “at least 4” or give a range such as 4-7. • If there is a specific word count range then insert this in the task-specific clarification. • If there is a selection of things to choose from in the published descriptors that are separated by commas, then it is appropriate to delete those that are not being measured by the task. • If the wording states “and/or”, then, once again, it is appropriate to keep both or delete one. However, it it says “and” then the task must provide for such. 88
  74. 74. Accommodation • For students who require further accommodation, the rubrics remain the same if those students are in the SAME course to ensure a standardized approach. However, the task may be modified to allow all students the equal opportunity to achieve should they have documented learning differences and should be modified according to their individual learning plan that has been agreed upon at the school. 89
  75. 75. Devise an ATL skill learning activity that: Uses 21st century strategies Builds the skill Allows for differentiation when appropriate
  76. 76. devise a formative assessment For this same learning activity . . . Based on which of your inquiry questions? Will you also be activating prior knowledge? What kind of feedback will you give?
  77. 77. TEACHERS Educate = e (out, up) + duc (lead, pull) + ate (act of) The act of leading up or drawing out - from the Latin educatus
  78. 78. Need to know Worried Excited Stance on Next Chapter Unit Planning

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