0
Maternal Depressive Symptoms:  More than the Baby Blues     Linda S. Beeber, PhD, RN  The University of North Carolina at ...
About Our Research•   “Reducing Depressive Symptoms in Low-Income Mothers”     – National Institute of Mental Health•   “E...
I will address these questions:• How do I know a mother is depressed?• How do depressive symptoms interfere  with optimal ...
How do I know a mother is      depressed?
Depression is…• a persistent sad mood and loss of joy  accompanied by changes in thinking,  feeling, behaving, relationshi...
Depression• Does not have to reach clinical levels  to interfere with mothering• Depressive symptoms are ALWAYS  important...
Depressive Symptoms and Mothers:         National Figures• During pregnancy:   – Trimester 1 --- 7.4%   – Trimester 2 --- ...
Depressive Symptoms              and Mothers• North Carolina:   – 19% of new mothers indicated they were moderately or    ...
Baby Blues or Depressive             Symptoms?                  HANDOUT      Baby Blues                  Depressive Sxs/De...
Three Presentations• “Blunted mother”  – Sad or emotion-less  – Slowed, fatiqued• “Angry, irritable mother”  – Emotionally...
How Do I Know that a Mother is   Depressed During Pregnancy?• Persistence of symptoms e.g., morning  sickness & vomiting p...
How Do I Know that a Mother is         Depressed? (Parenting)•   Short, less frequent interactions•   Little interest or c...
How Do I Know that a Mother is       Depressed? (Parenting)• Intrusive parenting actions that don’t  correspond to the chi...
How Do I Know that a Mother is    Depressed? (Program Participation)• Decreased involvement in     • Not following through...
How do depressive symptomsinterfere with optimal mothering and     affect her infant or toddler?
To An Infant or Toddler,       Mother is “the World”• Teaches the “Mother Tongue”• Creates the beginning of “Me”• Models t...
To An Infant or Toddler,       Mother is “the World”• Teaches the “Mother Tongue”  – “Motherese” builds first language  – ...
To An Infant or Toddler,       Mother is “the World”• Creates the beginning of “Me”  – Mother smiles at me (“I must be    ...
To An Infant or Toddler,        Mother is “the World”• Models the very first intimate  relationship   – Mother is there to...
To An Infant or Toddler,       Mother is “the World”• Makes the first “Social Introductions”  – Mother shows me off to kin...
How Do Mothers’ Depressive    Symptoms Impact Infants &           Toddlers?• Delayed language & developmental  milestones•...
What Factors Put a Mother at Risk  for Depressive Symptoms?
Risks to Mothers?• Previous depressive symptoms, diagnosed  depressive disorder, or other mood disorder• Childhood trauma•...
What Can I Do?
Curriculum Project• Regular program activities can support a  depressed parent• Staff need support to work closely with de...
What Can I Do? 10 Lessons…1. Keep the child in the program2. Reach out3. Keep trying4. Be patient. Be consistent. Don’t Ta...
What Can I Do? 10 Lessons…6. Keep it simple. Repeat things. Give her    reminders. Emphasize one strength.7. Break big goa...
A Mother is Depressed…What to               Do?LEVEL ONE: Referral for evaluation; Intensive servicesand close contact by ...
A Mother is Depressed…What to               Do?LEVEL TWO: Referral for immediate evaluation;Frequent Monitoring by staff w...
A Mother is Depressed…What to               Do?LEVEL THREE: Immediate Protective Containment andContinuous Monitoring espe...
Questions????                  Linda S. Beeber                 beeber@email.unc.edu     The University of North Carolina a...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Client Engagement and Mental Health

356

Published on

L.Beeber - 2012 South Carolina Home Visting Summit

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
356
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Transcript of "Client Engagement and Mental Health"

  1. 1. Maternal Depressive Symptoms: More than the Baby Blues Linda S. Beeber, PhD, RN The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Nursing CB # 7460 Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7460 Tel: (919) 843-2386 FAX: (919) 966-0894 beeber@email.unc.edu
  2. 2. About Our Research• “Reducing Depressive Symptoms in Low-Income Mothers” – National Institute of Mental Health• “EHS Latina Mothers: Reducing Depressive Symptoms and Improving Infant/Toddler Mental Health” – DHHS/Administration for Child and Family/ACYF Early Head Start- University Partnership Grant• “Alumbrando el camino/Bright Moments:” A Curriculum for Staff Working with Early Head Start Parents with Depressive Symptoms – DHHS/Administration for Child and Family/ACYF Early Head Start- University Partnership Grant• Feasibility of Screening and Recruitment of Low-Income, LEP Latina Mothers Community-Dwelling Mothers” – National Institute of Mental Health
  3. 3. I will address these questions:• How do I know a mother is depressed?• How do depressive symptoms interfere with optimal mothering and affect her infant or toddler?• What risk factors should I know about?• What can I do?
  4. 4. How do I know a mother is depressed?
  5. 5. Depression is…• a persistent sad mood and loss of joy accompanied by changes in thinking, feeling, behaving, relationships, and bodily functions. The symptoms of depression may be different from one person to the next, but the sad mood and loss of joy are almost always present, even if the person seems outwardly angry or irritable.
  6. 6. Depression• Does not have to reach clinical levels to interfere with mothering• Depressive symptoms are ALWAYS important in a mother of an infant or toddler• Depressive symptoms that last 6 months or longer will negatively affect the infant or toddler
  7. 7. Depressive Symptoms and Mothers: National Figures• During pregnancy: – Trimester 1 --- 7.4% – Trimester 2 --- 12.8 – Trimester 3 --- 12.0• 19% women experience depression at some point including post partum• “Postpartum” is a milestone – may not be related to the pregnancy!• Influenced by samples providing the data
  8. 8. Depressive Symptoms and Mothers• North Carolina: – 19% of new mothers indicated they were moderately or severely depressed after delivery (PRAMS 2001-2003) – 23% African American/Lumbee Indian sample in Eastern NC – 48% National Early Head Start Evaluation – 51% Latina mothers in 3 Early Head Start (EHS) programs scored over 16 on the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) (97 out of 191)(Alas, 2007) – 53% African American and Caucasian mothers in 7 EHS programs in NC (6 and NY (461/877 mothers)
  9. 9. Baby Blues or Depressive Symptoms? HANDOUT Baby Blues Depressive Sxs/Depression2-3 days after delivery May be there during pregnancy, appear anytime after deliveryLast a week or less Persist for more than a weekA few symptoms; come and Many symptoms are presentgo (sad, crying,overwhelmed) (see list on “What to Do” handout)Mother can be “cheered up” Mother cannot be “cheered up”
  10. 10. Three Presentations• “Blunted mother” – Sad or emotion-less – Slowed, fatiqued• “Angry, irritable mother” – Emotionally reactive to noise, frustrations – Unpredictable• “Good enough mother” – Adequately nurtures the child – No energy for other aspects of her life
  11. 11. How Do I Know that a Mother is Depressed During Pregnancy?• Persistence of symptoms e.g., morning sickness & vomiting past 3rd month• Self-endangerment (poor nutrition, lack of care, excessive exercise, smoking, drugs)• Disinterest in preparing for the baby• Dread or negative beliefs about the outcome or toward the baby
  12. 12. How Do I Know that a Mother is Depressed? (Parenting)• Short, less frequent interactions• Little interest or child-centered attention• Rarely touches• Rough touch• Sad, angry face toward the child• Critical judgments of child• Negative responses to the child that are not anchored to her/his behavior
  13. 13. How Do I Know that a Mother is Depressed? (Parenting)• Intrusive parenting actions that don’t correspond to the child’s cues• Talking “at” the child – ordering the child to do things• No joy when the child accomplishes something• No playfulness with the child (everything is serious business)• No pride or in being a parent or openly angry about being a parent
  14. 14. How Do I Know that a Mother is Depressed? (Program Participation)• Decreased involvement in • Not following through on activities they previously parenting activities that attended are suggested• Coming late or leaving • Avoiding or confronting early from activities teachers & staff• Looking bored with the • Complaining to activity administration about• Being loudly critical of teachers or staff behavior activities
  15. 15. How do depressive symptomsinterfere with optimal mothering and affect her infant or toddler?
  16. 16. To An Infant or Toddler, Mother is “the World”• Teaches the “Mother Tongue”• Creates the beginning of “Me”• Models the very first intimate relationship• Makes the first “Social Introductions”
  17. 17. To An Infant or Toddler, Mother is “the World”• Teaches the “Mother Tongue” – “Motherese” builds first language – Mother talks my language (“Wow! I can sound like she does!”)• Depressed mothers talk less or in consistently low tones
  18. 18. To An Infant or Toddler, Mother is “the World”• Creates the beginning of “Me” – Mother smiles at me (“I must be beautiful”) – Mother kisses me (“I must be loveable”) – Mother looks joyfully at me (I must be a good person!”)• Depressed mothers struggle to show joy and positive feelings
  19. 19. To An Infant or Toddler, Mother is “the World”• Models the very first intimate relationship – Mother is there to help me (“Others are safe and I can rely on them”) – Mother is gentle (“I can expect others to be trustworthy”)• Depressed mothers struggle to stay connected and consistently responsive
  20. 20. To An Infant or Toddler, Mother is “the World”• Makes the first “Social Introductions” – Mother shows me off to kin and community (“I must be somebody!”) – Mother tells me how to behave in her social circle (“I must belong here”)• Depressed mothers isolate themselves and are anxious in social settings
  21. 21. How Do Mothers’ Depressive Symptoms Impact Infants & Toddlers?• Delayed language & developmental milestones• More negative affect• Severe tantrums• Less social interest & exploration
  22. 22. What Factors Put a Mother at Risk for Depressive Symptoms?
  23. 23. Risks to Mothers?• Previous depressive symptoms, diagnosed depressive disorder, or other mood disorder• Childhood trauma• Recent “exit” events• “Shame” or “Entrapment” events• Current stressors (may be mild but chronic)• Interpersonal tensions• Poor social support, especially confidant support
  24. 24. What Can I Do?
  25. 25. Curriculum Project• Regular program activities can support a depressed parent• Staff need support to work closely with depressed parents especially around crisis situations
  26. 26. What Can I Do? 10 Lessons…1. Keep the child in the program2. Reach out3. Keep trying4. Be patient. Be consistent. Don’t Take Over!5. Stay sensitive to her low energy
  27. 27. What Can I Do? 10 Lessons…6. Keep it simple. Repeat things. Give her reminders. Emphasize one strength.7. Break big goals into small ones.8. Praise them.9. Expectations low…optimism high.10. Invest in the mother, not her progress.
  28. 28. A Mother is Depressed…What to Do?LEVEL ONE: Referral for evaluation; Intensive servicesand close contact by phone • Sad, but can get out of the mood • Scattered thoughts, but able to focus on tasks for short periods; child care does not suffer • Not much pleasure in things; little interest in activities; • Feels worthless about the self • Withdraws from others; stays to self • Sleep, eating, sexual desire, energy level are all down, but not totally disrupted
  29. 29. A Mother is Depressed…What to Do?LEVEL TWO: Referral for immediate evaluation;Frequent Monitoring by staff with Family/Other SupportContinuous • Sad all the time, can’t get out of the mood • Can’t focus on other thoughts, concentrate or make decisions • Continuous crying • Irritated with others and noise (especially crying or whining by the child) • Regular work and care of child is not adequate • Sleep is poor, but can get some; eating is poor, but is able to eat
  30. 30. A Mother is Depressed…What to Do?LEVEL THREE: Immediate Protective Containment andContinuous Monitoring especially when with the child • Thoughts are mostly about depression or harm (may include harming the child) • Suicidal ideas present with a plan and/or a method • Voices or beliefs that are strange • Not able to function (remaining in bed all day; inability to care for the child) • Not able to sleep or eat for several days Always talk to your supervisor, team or mental health resource person
  31. 31. Questions???? Linda S. Beeber beeber@email.unc.edu The University of North Carolina at Chapel HillSchool of Nursing Tel: (919) 843-2386 FAX: (919) 966-0984 CB #7460, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7460
  1. A particular slide catching your eye?

    Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

×