USING YOUR VOICE FOR
SOUTH CAROLINA„S
CHILDREN
Sue Williams,
Chief Executive
Officer
Megan Branham,
Policy and
Government
...
Advocacy, Policy,
and Program
Development
Monitoring, Sur
veillance, and
Evaluation
Fund Direct
Service
Provision
Convene ...
Prevent Child Abuse
South Carolina
Community Based
Child Abuse
Prevention
MIECHV
Safe Kids of South
Carolina
Evidence-base...
Strengthening Families: The Protective Factors
Framework to preventing child abuse and neglect:
 Parental resilience: man...
There are 1 million
children under 18 in
South Carolina
Children don‟t vote
SC‟s child-wellbeing
ranks 45th in the nati...
Annie E. Casey Foundation
supported since 1989 to
measure overall child-well
being
New format: 4 domains, 16
indicators
...
Children’s Trust of South Carolina
scchildren.org
Children’s Trust of South Carolina
scchildren.org
Children‟s Trust of South Carolina
scchildren.org
KIDS COUNT U.S. & S.C.
Children‟s Trust of South Carolina
scchildren.org
KIDS COUNT U.S. & S.C.
Children‟s Trust of South Carolina
scchildren.org
KIDS COUNT U.S. & S.C.
Children‟s Trust of South Carolina
scchildren.org
KIDS COUNT U.S. & S.C.
ADVOCACY: BEING A VOICE FOR CHILDREN
13
Number of SC
Senators?
Number of SC
Representatives?
 How long is the
annual legislative
session?
Children’s Trust of S...
Children’s Trust of South Carolina
scchildren.org
Children‟s Trust of South Carolina
scchildren.org
PATH OF A BILL
Bill
introduced
and read to
full body
Sent to
committee
S...
 Vote!
Are you registered to vote? Is your staff?
Do you give staff time off / encourage them to vote?
 Know and under...
 Case building: know your audience:
Start with “I‟m a constituent and I live….”
How are they connected to your mission?...
 Creativity: facts and a story
Zackery Lystedt
“Concussions are the 6th leading cause of injury to kids
under 18”
 Del...
 Most Effective Tactics
Personal visits
Meet during and outside of session
Meet in home district
Staff members are gr...
 Get to know your elected officials. Including local (city
and county council), state (state legislature), and
national (...
Children’s Trust of South Carolina
scchildren.org
SCCHILDREN.ORG/ADVOCACY_AND_MEDIA
Children’s Trust of South Carolina
scchildren.org
LEGISLATIVE TRACKING
 Our agenda focuses on legislation primarily in education, health
and safety that affect child well-being.
 We group leg...
Children’s Trust of South Carolina
scchildren.org
ADVOCACY EFFORTS AT THEIR BEST!
Student Athlete Concussion Law Signing A...
Sue Williams
Chief Executive Officer
Children‟s Trust of South Carolina
803-744-4023
swilliams@scchildren.org
scchildren.o...
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Using Your Voice for South Carolina‘s Children

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  • Parents are more likely to achieve healthy, favorable outcomes if they are resilient. Resilience is the process of managing stress and functioning well even when faced with Parents’ constructive and supportive social connections—that is, relationships with family members, friends, neighbors, co-workers, community members and service providers—are valuable resources who provide: • emotional support (e.g., affirming parenting skills or being empathic and nonjudgmental) • informational support (e.g., providing parenting guidance or recommending a pediatric dentist)• instrumental support (e.g., providing transportation, financial assistance or links tojobs) • spiritual support (e.g., providing hope andNo parent knows everything about children or is a “perfect parent.” An understanding of parenting strategies and child development helps parents understand what to expect and how to provide what children need during each developmental phase. All parents, and those who work with children, can benefit from increasing their knowledge and understanding of child development, including:• physical, cognitive, language, social andemotional development• signs indicating a child may have adevelopmental delay and needs special help• cultural factors that influence parenting practices and the perception of children• factors that promote or inhibit healthy child outcomes• discipline and how to positively impact childAssisting parents to identify, find and receive concrete support in times of need helps to ensure they and their family receive the basic necessities everyone deserves in order to grow (e.g., healthy food, a safe environment), as well as specialized medical, mental health, social, educational or legal services.When parents are faced with overwhelminglyEarly childhood is a period of both great opportunity and vulnerability. Early childhood experiences set the stage for later health, wellbeing and learning. In the past, most of the focus was on building young children’s academic skills in an effort to ensure they were prepared for school. However, in recent years a growing body of research has demonstrated the strong link between young children’s social-emotional competence and their cognitive development, language skills, mental health and school success. The dimensions of social-emotional competence in early childhood include: • self-esteem - good feelings about oneself • self-confidence - being open to new challenges and willing to explore new environments • self-efficacy - believing that one is capable of performing an action • self-regulation/self-control - following rules, controlling impulses, acting appropriately based on the context • personal agency - planning and carrying out purposeful actions• executive functioning - staying focused on a task and avoiding distractions • patience - learning to wait• persistence - willingness to try again when first attempts are not successful • conflictresolution - resolving disagreements in a peaceful way• communication skills - understanding and expressing a range of positive and negative emotions • empathy - understanding and responding to the emotions and rights of others • social skills - making friends and getting along with others• morality - learning a sense of right and wrong The Center for the Study of Social Policy (CSSP) works to create new ideas and promote public policies that produce equal opportunities and better futures for all children and families, especially those most often left behind. The foundation of all of CSSP’s work is a child, family and community well-being framework that includes a focus on protective and promotive factors. Using an ecological perspective: • protective factors are conditions or attributes of individuals, families, communities or the larger society that mitigate or eliminate risk• promotive factors are conditions or attributes of individuals, families, communities or the larger society that actively enhance well-being
  • Have people guess and give prizes: Number of SC Senators-46Number of SC Representatives-124Session begins on the second Tuesday in January and runs through the first Thursday in June.
  • Terri L. Sjodin, who is the bestselling author of  Small Message, Big Impact: The Elevator Speech Effect,
  • Building relationships with your legislators is kind of like digging a well before you are thirsty. It sets a foundation in which asking for a favor later won’t seem so awkward and can set you up for success Know your subcommittees – they are made up of less people and therefore easier to influence
  • Using Your Voice for South Carolina‘s Children

    1. 1. USING YOUR VOICE FOR SOUTH CAROLINA„S CHILDREN Sue Williams, Chief Executive Officer Megan Branham, Policy and Government Liaison Children‟s Trust of South Carolina September 11, 2013
    2. 2. Advocacy, Policy, and Program Development Monitoring, Sur veillance, and Evaluation Fund Direct Service Provision Convene public and private partnerships Training and Professional Development Mission: To strengthen and support public and private prevention efforts that keep South Carolina's children safe. What We Do
    3. 3. Prevent Child Abuse South Carolina Community Based Child Abuse Prevention MIECHV Safe Kids of South Carolina Evidence-based Parenting Programs Strengthening Families Program Training and Professional Development Policy and Advocacy Mission: To strengthen and support public and private prevention efforts that keep South Carolina's children safe. How We Do
    4. 4. Strengthening Families: The Protective Factors Framework to preventing child abuse and neglect:  Parental resilience: managing stress, problem solving  Social connections: friends & family that support  Knowledge of parenting and child development: nurturing, positive interactions, safety  Concrete support in times of need: basic needs  Social-emotional competence of children: positive perception and responses to child Children’s Trust of South Carolina scchildren.org PROTECTIVE FACTORS SHAPE OUR WORK
    5. 5. There are 1 million children under 18 in South Carolina Children don‟t vote SC‟s child-wellbeing ranks 45th in the nation Children’s Trust of South Carolina scchildren.org WHY CHILDREN NEED OUR VOICE
    6. 6. Annie E. Casey Foundation supported since 1989 to measure overall child-well being New format: 4 domains, 16 indicators Domains of Economic Well- Being, Education, Health and Family & Community Children‟s Trust of South Carolina scchildren.org DATA: KIDS COUNT
    7. 7. Children’s Trust of South Carolina scchildren.org
    8. 8. Children’s Trust of South Carolina scchildren.org
    9. 9. Children‟s Trust of South Carolina scchildren.org KIDS COUNT U.S. & S.C.
    10. 10. Children‟s Trust of South Carolina scchildren.org KIDS COUNT U.S. & S.C.
    11. 11. Children‟s Trust of South Carolina scchildren.org KIDS COUNT U.S. & S.C.
    12. 12. Children‟s Trust of South Carolina scchildren.org KIDS COUNT U.S. & S.C.
    13. 13. ADVOCACY: BEING A VOICE FOR CHILDREN 13
    14. 14. Number of SC Senators? Number of SC Representatives?  How long is the annual legislative session? Children’s Trust of South Carolina scchildren.org SC LEGISLATURE AND SESSION
    15. 15. Children’s Trust of South Carolina scchildren.org
    16. 16. Children‟s Trust of South Carolina scchildren.org PATH OF A BILL Bill introduced and read to full body Sent to committee Sent to full body Voted on by full body Passes and moves to other full body Same process Voted on by full body Passes and moves to Governor Governor signs into a bill
    17. 17.  Vote! Are you registered to vote? Is your staff? Do you give staff time off / encourage them to vote?  Know and understand the issues, use KIDS COUNT. Share the issues with friends and family.  Find and tell your story Data is good but a personal story is better, more powerful Children’s Trust of South Carolina scchildren.org GETTING INVOLVED IN ADVOCACY: THE BASICS
    18. 18.  Case building: know your audience: Start with “I‟m a constituent and I live….” How are they connected to your mission? Do they have kids, grandkids? Have their sponsored/co-sponsored legislation you support? “As a dad of two girls, I know you are concerned about their safety.” Or “thank you for co- sponsoring H/S _____ to keep kids safe.” Children‟s Trust of South Carolina scchildren.org EFFECTIVE MESSAGING
    19. 19.  Creativity: facts and a story Zackery Lystedt “Concussions are the 6th leading cause of injury to kids under 18”  Delivery: your voice, not canned Congressman Gowdy: “It doesn‟t matter if you‟re always right but it always matters that you are authentic.” “I want to keep kids in South Carolina safe and I can‟t do it without you. Can I count on you to help me by voting „yes‟ for H/S_____?” Children’s Trust of South Carolina scchildren.org EFFECTIVE MESSAGING
    20. 20.  Most Effective Tactics Personal visits Meet during and outside of session Meet in home district Staff members are great contacts! Personal phone calls or letters  E-mails are less effective  Social media (Twitter and Facebook) Concentrate on YOUR legislators Attend and speak at subcommittee hearings Children‟s Trust of South Carolina scchildren.org ADVOCACY TACTICS
    21. 21.  Get to know your elected officials. Including local (city and county council), state (state legislature), and national (Congress). How do they vote on issues relating to children?  Are you a member of a professional or community organization? Connect with their advocacy efforts. Sign up for Children's Trust Policy Post e-newsletter and join our Advocacy Network! Children’s Trust of South Carolina scchildren.org GETTING INVOLVED IN ADVOCACY: THE BASICS
    22. 22. Children’s Trust of South Carolina scchildren.org SCCHILDREN.ORG/ADVOCACY_AND_MEDIA
    23. 23. Children’s Trust of South Carolina scchildren.org LEGISLATIVE TRACKING
    24. 24.  Our agenda focuses on legislation primarily in education, health and safety that affect child well-being.  We group legislation in to four buckets: lead, endorse, monitor, and oppose.  We add and remove legislation throughout the session  In 2014, we are focusing on the following legislation:  Child passenger safety  Recreational Off-Highway Vehicle safety  Distracted driving (texting)  Expanding list of mandated reporters for child abuse  Enhancing background checks for childcare workers Children’s Trust of South Carolina scchildren.org OUR LEGISLATIVE AGENDA
    25. 25. Children’s Trust of South Carolina scchildren.org ADVOCACY EFFORTS AT THEIR BEST! Student Athlete Concussion Law Signing August 15, 2013
    26. 26. Sue Williams Chief Executive Officer Children‟s Trust of South Carolina 803-744-4023 swilliams@scchildren.org scchildren.org Megan Branham, LMSW Policy and Government Liaison Children‟s Trust of South Carolina 803-744-4047 mbranham@scchildren.org scchildren.org Children‟s Trust of South Carolina scchildren.org QUESTIONS & CONTACT
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