Americas by Peter Winn<br />Topic #3<br />Juan Manuel de Rosas<br />
El CaudilloJuan Manuel de Rosas<br />The Beginnings of Dictatorship in Latin America<br />
Before Rosas<br />During the early days of the Republic, Argentina was plagued by years of civil war between two opposing ...
Rosas’ Goal<br />	“Society was in a state of utter dissolution. Gone was the influence of those men who in every society a...
Rosas Timeline<br />1793: Juan Manuel de Rosas is born to members of the ranching elite<br />1829: Elected governor of Bue...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Americas 3 by peter winn

782
-1

Published on

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
782
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
7
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Americas 3 by peter winn

  1. 1. Americas by Peter Winn<br />Topic #3<br />Juan Manuel de Rosas<br />
  2. 2. El CaudilloJuan Manuel de Rosas<br />The Beginnings of Dictatorship in Latin America<br />
  3. 3. Before Rosas<br />During the early days of the Republic, Argentina was plagued by years of civil war between two opposing political factions – the Federalists and the Unitarians.<br />The Federalists demanded autonomy for the regions of Argentina through a loose “confederation of its provinces.” (Winn, 94).<br />The Unitarians wanted a strong, centralized government. <br />“At bottom, this fratricidal conflict was a struggle over who would reap the economic gains and pay the costs of independence. It pitted the merchants of Buenos Aires and the desire for a monopoly of free trade against interior provinces trying to protect their artisans from the competition of “the thin, showy, and low-priced goods of English manufacture.”” (ibid.)<br />This polarization allowed for the empowerment of local landowner, or caudillos, to reign supreme, treating “the resources of the state as his own,” (Winn, 95). This was pushing Argentina closer and closer to a national state of anarchy.<br />
  4. 4. Rosas’ Goal<br /> “Society was in a state of utter dissolution. Gone was the influence of those men who in every society are destined to take control; the spirit of insubordination had spread and taken widespread roots…no one was prepared either to order or to obey. In the countryside there was no security for lives or property….The inevitable time had arrived when it was necessary to exercise personal influence on the masses to reestablish order, security and laws.” [Explained by Rosas in 1835 – (Winn, 97).<br />
  5. 5. Rosas Timeline<br />1793: Juan Manuel de Rosas is born to members of the ranching elite<br />1829: Elected governor of Buenos Aires Province<br />1833: Rosas leaves office to lead army of Buenos Aires in a war against local Indians on the southern border of the province. This control of the army is key “in his consolidation of power” (Winn, 95)<br />1835: By using his power and influence on all other local leaders – his position is raised to dictator of Argentina, imposing a brutal and conservative regime on the country<br />1843: Rosas intervenes in the Uruguayan civil war, and attempts to seize Montevideo. This conflict would last for nearly nine years. This is the beginning of the end for Rosas.<br />1851: The long battle in Uruguay, teamed with Rosas’ stubborness at opening up the Rio de la Plata to free navigation, and the absence of a constitution, led to Rosas’ defeat at the hands of his ally and general, Justo Jose de Urquiza, the Federalist governor of Enre Rios. <br />1852: Urquiza defeats Rosas’ army at Caseros with the help of Brazil<br />1853: Urquiza calls a convention. A constitution for Argentina is written. <br />1861: By way of military battle, Buenos Aires joins the Constitutional Argentina.<br />Winn, Peter. Americas: The Changing Face of Latin America and the Caribbean. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1992.<br />http://www.historyworld.net/wrldhis/PlainTextHistories.asp?historyid=ac09<br />

×