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CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video
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CETS 2011, Greg Owen-Boger, handout for Down & Dirty Video

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  • 1. Down & Dirty Video:Practical strategies for producing engaging E-Learning video on a budget Video Production Basics Video Production 1. Start with a well-planned instructional design Principles for with clear goals & learning objectives E-Learning 2. Consider your brand Then: • Identify video opportunities to support #1 • Shoot video consistent with #2 • Eliminate distractions for both Camera Type, Placement When choosing a camera, consider: Angle & Framing • Standard vs. high definition • Media storage and communication with editing software • Audio quality & capture method Place the camera a good distance from you and zoom in. Putting the camera too close can distort your facial features. Angle the camera so that it is at eye level, which is the most natural placement from the viewer’s perspective. Placing it too high or too low can lookThe rule of thirds strange. Frame yourself in an interesting way. Follow the rule of thirds and position your head within the frame at roughly the intersection of the lines in the illustration. Allow some headroom and looking room so you don’t appear cramped. Adjust the tilt so that horizontal and vertical lines in the shot appear level.Find your focus. Be yourself. Only better.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 1Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 2. Lighting that Flatters Flatter your facial features by lighting yourself well. It’s best to start with a dark room and build a 3-point lighting plot from scratch.3-point lighting Point 1: The Key Light (brightest) should be positioned behind the camera, off to the side and at roughly a 45 degree angle above your head. Point 2: The Fill Light (second brightest) should be placed on the opposite side of the camera and used to fill in the shadows created by the Key. It too should be about 45 degrees above your head. Point 3: The Back Light (dimmest) should be placed behind and to one side. It provides dimension to the video by lighting your hair and shoulders. Diffuse the light to soften the shadows. Use diffusion materials purchased from a camera store or improvise using parchment paper or vellum. Everyone’s features are different, so start with the 3- point lighting scheme and make adjustments for your particular situation. Audio Capture Built-in microphones may not be good enough. If using an external microphone, place it a natural distance from you to capture the volume level suggested by the camera. It should not be in the shot nor create shadows. If the audio you capture has a thin quality or has faint echoes, do what you can to soften the hard surfaces in the room. Hang acoustic foam panels or draperies on the walls, and lay down carpeting.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 2Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 3. Setting Up Your Studio Consider the best location to meet your goals. Shooting in the learner’s natural habitat is often a good way to connect with them. • Should you be in an office or out in the field? • Would it be better to be in a branded or green screen studio? Decorate your set to work in harmony with your brand, try to keep things balanced and eliminate distractions. Avoid sets that look too sterile, staged or cluttered. Wardrobe, Hair & Keep your appearance appropriate for your Complexion organization, choose items that flatter and eliminate distractions. When choosing your wardrobe, opt for solids that contrast with each other and your surroundings. Avoid: • Loud patterns and stripes, which can cause video “noise.” • White, which can negatively affect the white balance setting on the camera. Pay attention to your hair. Keep it off your face, and get rid of fly-aways. The camera and lighting can make your complexion look unattractive. Improve your skin’s appearance by applying a light layer of skin-tone powder. Reapply often to tone down shine created by the lights. Editing When editing, keep things simple. Avoid the temptation to use fancy transitions and effects. They do little to advance the learning, and call too much attention to themselves. When shopping for editing software, look for the ability to: • Export and work with course-building software, SCORM and LMS • Import a variety of video & image formats • Run multiple video & audio tracks • Edit sound including noise reduction • Add text & titlesDown Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 3Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 4. Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 4Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 5. Engaging Learners On Camera Find your focus. The key to looking & sounding natural on video is to Be yourself. be engaged. This means you need to be in control of your Only better. thoughts, your movement and your speech. To do this, work hard to: • Find your focus: Pause to calm your racing mind and to think clearly. • Be yourself: Make sure the person captured on video looks, sounds and acts like the most professional and conversational version of the real you. • Only better: You may need to adapt to the complexities of video by slowing your speaking pace, moving less, smiling more, and so on. Identify Who You Are Address a single person with whom you have a Talking To friendly relationship. Doing this, rather than speaking to a faceless group of people, will make your video feel more personal. It will also positively affect your tone, enthusiasm and word choice. Make solid eye contact with the camera’s lens. Avoid looking to the side or beyond the camera; both will make you appear as if you’re disengaged or reading from a script.Find your focus. Be yourself. Only better.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 5Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 6. Be Clear, Concise, The first step to a successful video shoot is to start with an Conversational, Not excellent instructional design from which a script or Scripted detailed outline can be written. (see handout, page 7) Then, the key to sounding spontaneous and conversational is to wean yourself off of it by creating notes from which you can improvise. We recommend this process. Start with Excellent Instructional Design Write Script or Detailed Outline Gather Thoughts, Make Connections Create Notes as Cue Cards Review Out Loud Smile, Engage Your Friend, and… Action!Other Recommendations Do not use a teleprompter. Learn to sneak a peek. Be patient & ask it of others. Take breaks. Break it down into manageable clips. Understand what can be edited & what can’t. Do as many takes as it takes. Do not settle for just OK, but do not strive for perfection either.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 6Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 7. SAMPLE Excerpt from a Shooting ScriptClip Visual Content NotesClip 6 Video of Greg Once you’ve zeroed in on the one person you’re speaking to, you’re more likely to sound conversational and natural. However, if you’ve done your planning, you probably have a script or at least an outline that you’re working from. So, how do you follow your script, engage your friend AND sound conversational? The answer lies in not memorizing your script or using an ad hoc teleprompter. While these ideas may seem logical, they don’t work because: • Stiff • Unnatural • Reading Instead make notes for yourself and improvise around them. Now, I’m not recommending never writing out a script. The exercise of writing it out can really help you focus your thoughts, surface new ideas and logically string concepts together across multiple video clips. But once the camera is rolling you need to abandon the script, scribble notes, place them within eye sight, and improvise your way around them.Clip 7 Cut, fade back Here’s how I do it. Pull script into view to Greg • For me, no more than 2/3 page and refer to it. • Before camera rolls I look at my script Should I write on the Here’s my script for this shot you’re watching right now. I have it right here out of the shot so I can white board? Just hold reference it at any time. But before we turned on the camera, I jotted down some notes on a white board a marker? and placed it right there (point to white board placement). Before hitting record: • Review notes, get my head together • Engage the camera • Go Sometimes I can get through the entire clip without any trouble. Other times I need to sneak a peek. (Show example.) It should look like I’m looking into thin air and grabbing a thought. But it’s a learned skill, and I’m not always successful. Experiment and see what works for you.Clip 8 Fade through As I’ve said, the goal should be to sound conversational. This can be challenging if your script is too long. Use this fade as an black, back to Now, you may have noticed that we just faded through black in the edit. This is a technique you can use example of what to do Greg to cut your script into more manageable chunks, which will make you more likely to sound conversational to break a clip into and natural. manageable chunks.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 7Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 8. About your Presenter – Greg Owen-Boger Greg Owen-Boger is the Vice President of Turpin Communication, a presentation and facilitation skills training company based in Chicago. Schooled in management and the performing arts, Greg brings a diverse set of skills and experiences to the organization. He joined Turpin in 1995 as a camera man and quickly worked his way up. He now serves as a communication trainer and coach for Turpin’s largest clients. He also oversees all aspects of their E-Learning (www.onlinepresentationskillstraining.com) and blended learning (www.turpincommunication.com/ecoach.php) platforms including instructional design, script development, production and LMS deployment. He also appears on camera as a subject matter expert.Most recently Greg partnered with KinetiCast, a unique sales video/presentation tool, to provide theirusers with practical online how-to videos to help them shoot better on-the-fly video presentations.greg@turpincommunication.com773-256-9406www.linkedin.com/in/gregowenbogerFounded in 1992, Turpin Communication is a presentation and facilitation training company based inChicago.We take a personalized and comprehensive skill-building approach to our work. This means thatlearners always work on their own real-life content, and over the course of a 12-month blendedlearning program, concepts are introduced, practiced, refined and reinforced.Here are some guiding principles woven into the fabric of all we do.Business presentations are not the same things as speeches. Presentations should be thoughtof more as “orderly conversations.” Orderly because they should be carefully planned; conversationalbecause they need to have the lively quality of spontaneous dialogue.Everyone has what we call a “Default Approach” to presenting. Some default to the orderlyside of presenting, others to the conversational. Understanding one’s default – and makingappropriate adjustments to make up for the associated weaknesses – is key to a presenter’s success.Engaging listeners, that is calming the racing mind and connecting with the individuals in the room,is critical to every presenter’s ability to successfully manage all of their orderly conversations. Whenpresenters are engaged, their natural skills and personalities emerge. They are self-aware and able tomanage the complexities of presenting.Facilitating is an extension of presenting. No matter the purpose behind any facilitated event, thecontent needs to be organized and introduced appropriately. Doing so requires the same skills aspresenting. Therefore, facilitation sessions begin by developing those skills. TurpinCommunication.com OnlinePresentationSkillsTraining.com Facebook.com/TurpinCommunicationDown Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 8Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 9. Down & Dirty Video:Practical strategies for producing engaging E-Learning video on a budget Video Production Basics Video Production 1. Start with a well-planned instructional design Principles for with clear goals & learning objectives E-Learning 2. Consider your brand Then: • Identify video opportunities to support #1 • Shoot video consistent with #2 • Eliminate distractions for both Camera Type, Placement When choosing a camera, consider: Angle & Framing • Standard vs. high definition • Media storage and communication with editing software • Audio quality & capture method Place the camera a good distance from you and zoom in. Putting the camera too close can distort your facial features. Angle the camera so that it is at eye level, which is the most natural placement from the viewer’s perspective. Placing it too high or too low can lookThe rule of thirds strange. Frame yourself in an interesting way. Follow the rule of thirds and position your head within the frame at roughly the intersection of the lines in the illustration. Allow some headroom and looking room so you don’t appear cramped. Adjust the tilt so that horizontal and vertical lines in the shot appear level.Find your focus. Be yourself. Only better.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 1Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 10. Lighting that Flatters Flatter your facial features by lighting yourself well. It’s best to start with a dark room and build a 3-point lighting plot from scratch.3-point lighting Point 1: The Key Light (brightest) should be positioned behind the camera, off to the side and at roughly a 45 degree angle above your head. Point 2: The Fill Light (second brightest) should be placed on the opposite side of the camera and used to fill in the shadows created by the Key. It too should be about 45 degrees above your head. Point 3: The Back Light (dimmest) should be placed behind and to one side. It provides dimension to the video by lighting your hair and shoulders. Diffuse the light to soften the shadows. Use diffusion materials purchased from a camera store or improvise using parchment paper or vellum. Everyone’s features are different, so start with the 3- point lighting scheme and make adjustments for your particular situation. Audio Capture Built-in microphones may not be good enough. If using an external microphone, place it a natural distance from you to capture the volume level suggested by the camera. It should not be in the shot nor create shadows. If the audio you capture has a thin quality or has faint echoes, do what you can to soften the hard surfaces in the room. Hang acoustic foam panels or draperies on the walls, and lay down carpeting.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 2Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 11. Setting Up Your Studio Consider the best location to meet your goals. Shooting in the learner’s natural habitat is often a good way to connect with them. • Should you be in an office or out in the field? • Would it be better to be in a branded or green screen studio? Decorate your set to work in harmony with your brand, try to keep things balanced and eliminate distractions. Avoid sets that look too sterile, staged or cluttered. Wardrobe, Hair & Keep your appearance appropriate for your Complexion organization, choose items that flatter and eliminate distractions. When choosing your wardrobe, opt for solids that contrast with each other and your surroundings. Avoid: • Loud patterns and stripes, which can cause video “noise.” • White, which can negatively affect the white balance setting on the camera. Pay attention to your hair. Keep it off your face, and get rid of fly-aways. The camera and lighting can make your complexion look unattractive. Improve your skin’s appearance by applying a light layer of skin-tone powder. Reapply often to tone down shine created by the lights. Editing When editing, keep things simple. Avoid the temptation to use fancy transitions and effects. They do little to advance the learning, and call too much attention to themselves. When shopping for editing software, look for the ability to: • Export and work with course-building software, SCORM and LMS • Import a variety of video & image formats • Run multiple video & audio tracks • Edit sound including noise reduction • Add text & titlesDown Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 3Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 12. Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 4Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 13. Engaging Learners On Camera Find your focus. The key to looking & sounding natural on video is to Be yourself. be engaged. This means you need to be in control of your Only better. thoughts, your movement and your speech. To do this, work hard to: • Find your focus: Pause to calm your racing mind and to think clearly. • Be yourself: Make sure the person captured on video looks, sounds and acts like the most professional and conversational version of the real you. • Only better: You may need to adapt to the complexities of video by slowing your speaking pace, moving less, smiling more, and so on. Identify Who You Are Address a single person with whom you have a Talking To friendly relationship. Doing this, rather than speaking to a faceless group of people, will make your video feel more personal. It will also positively affect your tone, enthusiasm and word choice. Make solid eye contact with the camera’s lens. Avoid looking to the side or beyond the camera; both will make you appear as if you’re disengaged or reading from a script.Find your focus. Be yourself. Only better.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 5Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 14. Be Clear, Concise, The first step to a successful video shoot is to start with an Conversational, Not excellent instructional design from which a script or Scripted detailed outline can be written. (see handout, page 7) Then, the key to sounding spontaneous and conversational is to wean yourself off of it by creating notes from which you can improvise. We recommend this process. Start with Excellent Instructional Design Write Script or Detailed Outline Gather Thoughts, Make Connections Create Notes as Cue Cards Review Out Loud Smile, Engage Your Friend, and… Action!Other Recommendations Do not use a teleprompter. Learn to sneak a peek. Be patient & ask it of others. Take breaks. Break it down into manageable clips. Understand what can be edited & what can’t. Do as many takes as it takes. Do not settle for just OK, but do not strive for perfection either.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 6Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 15. SAMPLE Excerpt from a Shooting ScriptClip Visual Content NotesClip 6 Video of Greg Once you’ve zeroed in on the one person you’re speaking to, you’re more likely to sound conversational and natural. However, if you’ve done your planning, you probably have a script or at least an outline that you’re working from. So, how do you follow your script, engage your friend AND sound conversational? The answer lies in not memorizing your script or using an ad hoc teleprompter. While these ideas may seem logical, they don’t work because: • Stiff • Unnatural • Reading Instead make notes for yourself and improvise around them. Now, I’m not recommending never writing out a script. The exercise of writing it out can really help you focus your thoughts, surface new ideas and logically string concepts together across multiple video clips. But once the camera is rolling you need to abandon the script, scribble notes, place them within eye sight, and improvise your way around them.Clip 7 Cut, fade back Here’s how I do it. Pull script into view to Greg • For me, no more than 2/3 page and refer to it. • Before camera rolls I look at my script Should I write on the Here’s my script for this shot you’re watching right now. I have it right here out of the shot so I can white board? Just hold reference it at any time. But before we turned on the camera, I jotted down some notes on a white board a marker? and placed it right there (point to white board placement). Before hitting record: • Review notes, get my head together • Engage the camera • Go Sometimes I can get through the entire clip without any trouble. Other times I need to sneak a peek. (Show example.) It should look like I’m looking into thin air and grabbing a thought. But it’s a learned skill, and I’m not always successful. Experiment and see what works for you.Clip 8 Fade through As I’ve said, the goal should be to sound conversational. This can be challenging if your script is too long. Use this fade as an black, back to Now, you may have noticed that we just faded through black in the edit. This is a technique you can use example of what to do Greg to cut your script into more manageable chunks, which will make you more likely to sound conversational to break a clip into and natural. manageable chunks.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 7Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 16. About your Presenter – Greg Owen-Boger Greg Owen-Boger is the Vice President of Turpin Communication, a presentation and facilitation skills training company based in Chicago. Schooled in management and the performing arts, Greg brings a diverse set of skills and experiences to the organization. He joined Turpin in 1995 as a camera man and quickly worked his way up. He now serves as a communication trainer and coach for Turpin’s largest clients. He also oversees all aspects of their E-Learning (www.onlinepresentationskillstraining.com) and blended learning (www.turpincommunication.com/ecoach.php) platforms including instructional design, script development, production and LMS deployment. He also appears on camera as a subject matter expert.Most recently Greg partnered with KinetiCast, a unique sales video/presentation tool, to provide theirusers with practical online how-to videos to help them shoot better on-the-fly video presentations.greg@turpincommunication.com773-256-9406www.linkedin.com/in/gregowenbogerFounded in 1992, Turpin Communication is a presentation and facilitation training company based inChicago.We take a personalized and comprehensive skill-building approach to our work. This means thatlearners always work on their own real-life content, and over the course of a 12-month blendedlearning program, concepts are introduced, practiced, refined and reinforced.Here are some guiding principles woven into the fabric of all we do.Business presentations are not the same things as speeches. Presentations should be thoughtof more as “orderly conversations.” Orderly because they should be carefully planned; conversationalbecause they need to have the lively quality of spontaneous dialogue.Everyone has what we call a “Default Approach” to presenting. Some default to the orderlyside of presenting, others to the conversational. Understanding one’s default – and makingappropriate adjustments to make up for the associated weaknesses – is key to a presenter’s success.Engaging listeners, that is calming the racing mind and connecting with the individuals in the room,is critical to every presenter’s ability to successfully manage all of their orderly conversations. Whenpresenters are engaged, their natural skills and personalities emerge. They are self-aware and able tomanage the complexities of presenting.Facilitating is an extension of presenting. No matter the purpose behind any facilitated event, thecontent needs to be organized and introduced appropriately. Doing so requires the same skills aspresenting. Therefore, facilitation sessions begin by developing those skills. TurpinCommunication.com OnlinePresentationSkillsTraining.com Facebook.com/TurpinCommunicationDown Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 8Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 17. Down & Dirty Video:Practical strategies for producing engaging E-Learning video on a budget Video Production Basics Video Production 1. Start with a well-planned instructional design Principles for with clear goals & learning objectives E-Learning 2. Consider your brand Then: • Identify video opportunities to support #1 • Shoot video consistent with #2 • Eliminate distractions for both Camera Type, Placement When choosing a camera, consider: Angle & Framing • Standard vs. high definition • Media storage and communication with editing software • Audio quality & capture method Place the camera a good distance from you and zoom in. Putting the camera too close can distort your facial features. Angle the camera so that it is at eye level, which is the most natural placement from the viewer’s perspective. Placing it too high or too low can lookThe rule of thirds strange. Frame yourself in an interesting way. Follow the rule of thirds and position your head within the frame at roughly the intersection of the lines in the illustration. Allow some headroom and looking room so you don’t appear cramped. Adjust the tilt so that horizontal and vertical lines in the shot appear level.Find your focus. Be yourself. Only better.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 1Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 18. Lighting that Flatters Flatter your facial features by lighting yourself well. It’s best to start with a dark room and build a 3-point lighting plot from scratch.3-point lighting Point 1: The Key Light (brightest) should be positioned behind the camera, off to the side and at roughly a 45 degree angle above your head. Point 2: The Fill Light (second brightest) should be placed on the opposite side of the camera and used to fill in the shadows created by the Key. It too should be about 45 degrees above your head. Point 3: The Back Light (dimmest) should be placed behind and to one side. It provides dimension to the video by lighting your hair and shoulders. Diffuse the light to soften the shadows. Use diffusion materials purchased from a camera store or improvise using parchment paper or vellum. Everyone’s features are different, so start with the 3- point lighting scheme and make adjustments for your particular situation. Audio Capture Built-in microphones may not be good enough. If using an external microphone, place it a natural distance from you to capture the volume level suggested by the camera. It should not be in the shot nor create shadows. If the audio you capture has a thin quality or has faint echoes, do what you can to soften the hard surfaces in the room. Hang acoustic foam panels or draperies on the walls, and lay down carpeting.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 2Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 19. Setting Up Your Studio Consider the best location to meet your goals. Shooting in the learner’s natural habitat is often a good way to connect with them. • Should you be in an office or out in the field? • Would it be better to be in a branded or green screen studio? Decorate your set to work in harmony with your brand, try to keep things balanced and eliminate distractions. Avoid sets that look too sterile, staged or cluttered. Wardrobe, Hair & Keep your appearance appropriate for your Complexion organization, choose items that flatter and eliminate distractions. When choosing your wardrobe, opt for solids that contrast with each other and your surroundings. Avoid: • Loud patterns and stripes, which can cause video “noise.” • White, which can negatively affect the white balance setting on the camera. Pay attention to your hair. Keep it off your face, and get rid of fly-aways. The camera and lighting can make your complexion look unattractive. Improve your skin’s appearance by applying a light layer of skin-tone powder. Reapply often to tone down shine created by the lights. Editing When editing, keep things simple. Avoid the temptation to use fancy transitions and effects. They do little to advance the learning, and call too much attention to themselves. When shopping for editing software, look for the ability to: • Export and work with course-building software, SCORM and LMS • Import a variety of video & image formats • Run multiple video & audio tracks • Edit sound including noise reduction • Add text & titlesDown Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 3Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 20. Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 4Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 21. Engaging Learners On Camera Find your focus. The key to looking & sounding natural on video is to Be yourself. be engaged. This means you need to be in control of your Only better. thoughts, your movement and your speech. To do this, work hard to: • Find your focus: Pause to calm your racing mind and to think clearly. • Be yourself: Make sure the person captured on video looks, sounds and acts like the most professional and conversational version of the real you. • Only better: You may need to adapt to the complexities of video by slowing your speaking pace, moving less, smiling more, and so on. Identify Who You Are Address a single person with whom you have a Talking To friendly relationship. Doing this, rather than speaking to a faceless group of people, will make your video feel more personal. It will also positively affect your tone, enthusiasm and word choice. Make solid eye contact with the camera’s lens. Avoid looking to the side or beyond the camera; both will make you appear as if you’re disengaged or reading from a script.Find your focus. Be yourself. Only better.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 5Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 22. Be Clear, Concise, The first step to a successful video shoot is to start with an Conversational, Not excellent instructional design from which a script or Scripted detailed outline can be written. (see handout, page 7) Then, the key to sounding spontaneous and conversational is to wean yourself off of it by creating notes from which you can improvise. We recommend this process. Start with Excellent Instructional Design Write Script or Detailed Outline Gather Thoughts, Make Connections Create Notes as Cue Cards Review Out Loud Smile, Engage Your Friend, and… Action!Other Recommendations Do not use a teleprompter. Learn to sneak a peek. Be patient & ask it of others. Take breaks. Break it down into manageable clips. Understand what can be edited & what can’t. Do as many takes as it takes. Do not settle for just OK, but do not strive for perfection either.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 6Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 23. SAMPLE Excerpt from a Shooting ScriptClip Visual Content NotesClip 6 Video of Greg Once you’ve zeroed in on the one person you’re speaking to, you’re more likely to sound conversational and natural. However, if you’ve done your planning, you probably have a script or at least an outline that you’re working from. So, how do you follow your script, engage your friend AND sound conversational? The answer lies in not memorizing your script or using an ad hoc teleprompter. While these ideas may seem logical, they don’t work because: • Stiff • Unnatural • Reading Instead make notes for yourself and improvise around them. Now, I’m not recommending never writing out a script. The exercise of writing it out can really help you focus your thoughts, surface new ideas and logically string concepts together across multiple video clips. But once the camera is rolling you need to abandon the script, scribble notes, place them within eye sight, and improvise your way around them.Clip 7 Cut, fade back Here’s how I do it. Pull script into view to Greg • For me, no more than 2/3 page and refer to it. • Before camera rolls I look at my script Should I write on the Here’s my script for this shot you’re watching right now. I have it right here out of the shot so I can white board? Just hold reference it at any time. But before we turned on the camera, I jotted down some notes on a white board a marker? and placed it right there (point to white board placement). Before hitting record: • Review notes, get my head together • Engage the camera • Go Sometimes I can get through the entire clip without any trouble. Other times I need to sneak a peek. (Show example.) It should look like I’m looking into thin air and grabbing a thought. But it’s a learned skill, and I’m not always successful. Experiment and see what works for you.Clip 8 Fade through As I’ve said, the goal should be to sound conversational. This can be challenging if your script is too long. Use this fade as an black, back to Now, you may have noticed that we just faded through black in the edit. This is a technique you can use example of what to do Greg to cut your script into more manageable chunks, which will make you more likely to sound conversational to break a clip into and natural. manageable chunks.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 7Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 24. About your Presenter – Greg Owen-Boger Greg Owen-Boger is the Vice President of Turpin Communication, a presentation and facilitation skills training company based in Chicago. Schooled in management and the performing arts, Greg brings a diverse set of skills and experiences to the organization. He joined Turpin in 1995 as a camera man and quickly worked his way up. He now serves as a communication trainer and coach for Turpin’s largest clients. He also oversees all aspects of their E-Learning (www.onlinepresentationskillstraining.com) and blended learning (www.turpincommunication.com/ecoach.php) platforms including instructional design, script development, production and LMS deployment. He also appears on camera as a subject matter expert.Most recently Greg partnered with KinetiCast, a unique sales video/presentation tool, to provide theirusers with practical online how-to videos to help them shoot better on-the-fly video presentations.greg@turpincommunication.com773-256-9406www.linkedin.com/in/gregowenbogerFounded in 1992, Turpin Communication is a presentation and facilitation training company based inChicago.We take a personalized and comprehensive skill-building approach to our work. This means thatlearners always work on their own real-life content, and over the course of a 12-month blendedlearning program, concepts are introduced, practiced, refined and reinforced.Here are some guiding principles woven into the fabric of all we do.Business presentations are not the same things as speeches. Presentations should be thoughtof more as “orderly conversations.” Orderly because they should be carefully planned; conversationalbecause they need to have the lively quality of spontaneous dialogue.Everyone has what we call a “Default Approach” to presenting. Some default to the orderlyside of presenting, others to the conversational. Understanding one’s default – and makingappropriate adjustments to make up for the associated weaknesses – is key to a presenter’s success.Engaging listeners, that is calming the racing mind and connecting with the individuals in the room,is critical to every presenter’s ability to successfully manage all of their orderly conversations. Whenpresenters are engaged, their natural skills and personalities emerge. They are self-aware and able tomanage the complexities of presenting.Facilitating is an extension of presenting. No matter the purpose behind any facilitated event, thecontent needs to be organized and introduced appropriately. Doing so requires the same skills aspresenting. Therefore, facilitation sessions begin by developing those skills. TurpinCommunication.com OnlinePresentationSkillsTraining.com Facebook.com/TurpinCommunicationDown Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 8Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 25. Down & Dirty Video:Practical strategies for producing engaging E-Learning video on a budget Video Production Basics Video Production 1. Start with a well-planned instructional design Principles for with clear goals & learning objectives E-Learning 2. Consider your brand Then: • Identify video opportunities to support #1 • Shoot video consistent with #2 • Eliminate distractions for both Camera Type, Placement When choosing a camera, consider: Angle & Framing • Standard vs. high definition • Media storage and communication with editing software • Audio quality & capture method Place the camera a good distance from you and zoom in. Putting the camera too close can distort your facial features. Angle the camera so that it is at eye level, which is the most natural placement from the viewer’s perspective. Placing it too high or too low can lookThe rule of thirds strange. Frame yourself in an interesting way. Follow the rule of thirds and position your head within the frame at roughly the intersection of the lines in the illustration. Allow some headroom and looking room so you don’t appear cramped. Adjust the tilt so that horizontal and vertical lines in the shot appear level.Find your focus. Be yourself. Only better.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 1Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 26. Lighting that Flatters Flatter your facial features by lighting yourself well. It’s best to start with a dark room and build a 3-point lighting plot from scratch.3-point lighting Point 1: The Key Light (brightest) should be positioned behind the camera, off to the side and at roughly a 45 degree angle above your head. Point 2: The Fill Light (second brightest) should be placed on the opposite side of the camera and used to fill in the shadows created by the Key. It too should be about 45 degrees above your head. Point 3: The Back Light (dimmest) should be placed behind and to one side. It provides dimension to the video by lighting your hair and shoulders. Diffuse the light to soften the shadows. Use diffusion materials purchased from a camera store or improvise using parchment paper or vellum. Everyone’s features are different, so start with the 3- point lighting scheme and make adjustments for your particular situation. Audio Capture Built-in microphones may not be good enough. If using an external microphone, place it a natural distance from you to capture the volume level suggested by the camera. It should not be in the shot nor create shadows. If the audio you capture has a thin quality or has faint echoes, do what you can to soften the hard surfaces in the room. Hang acoustic foam panels or draperies on the walls, and lay down carpeting.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 2Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 27. Setting Up Your Studio Consider the best location to meet your goals. Shooting in the learner’s natural habitat is often a good way to connect with them. • Should you be in an office or out in the field? • Would it be better to be in a branded or green screen studio? Decorate your set to work in harmony with your brand, try to keep things balanced and eliminate distractions. Avoid sets that look too sterile, staged or cluttered. Wardrobe, Hair & Keep your appearance appropriate for your Complexion organization, choose items that flatter and eliminate distractions. When choosing your wardrobe, opt for solids that contrast with each other and your surroundings. Avoid: • Loud patterns and stripes, which can cause video “noise.” • White, which can negatively affect the white balance setting on the camera. Pay attention to your hair. Keep it off your face, and get rid of fly-aways. The camera and lighting can make your complexion look unattractive. Improve your skin’s appearance by applying a light layer of skin-tone powder. Reapply often to tone down shine created by the lights. Editing When editing, keep things simple. Avoid the temptation to use fancy transitions and effects. They do little to advance the learning, and call too much attention to themselves. When shopping for editing software, look for the ability to: • Export and work with course-building software, SCORM and LMS • Import a variety of video & image formats • Run multiple video & audio tracks • Edit sound including noise reduction • Add text & titlesDown Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 3Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 28. Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 4Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 29. Engaging Learners On Camera Find your focus. The key to looking & sounding natural on video is to Be yourself. be engaged. This means you need to be in control of your Only better. thoughts, your movement and your speech. To do this, work hard to: • Find your focus: Pause to calm your racing mind and to think clearly. • Be yourself: Make sure the person captured on video looks, sounds and acts like the most professional and conversational version of the real you. • Only better: You may need to adapt to the complexities of video by slowing your speaking pace, moving less, smiling more, and so on. Identify Who You Are Address a single person with whom you have a Talking To friendly relationship. Doing this, rather than speaking to a faceless group of people, will make your video feel more personal. It will also positively affect your tone, enthusiasm and word choice. Make solid eye contact with the camera’s lens. Avoid looking to the side or beyond the camera; both will make you appear as if you’re disengaged or reading from a script.Find your focus. Be yourself. Only better.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 5Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 30. Be Clear, Concise, The first step to a successful video shoot is to start with an Conversational, Not excellent instructional design from which a script or Scripted detailed outline can be written. (see handout, page 7) Then, the key to sounding spontaneous and conversational is to wean yourself off of it by creating notes from which you can improvise. We recommend this process. Start with Excellent Instructional Design Write Script or Detailed Outline Gather Thoughts, Make Connections Create Notes as Cue Cards Review Out Loud Smile, Engage Your Friend, and… Action!Other Recommendations Do not use a teleprompter. Learn to sneak a peek. Be patient & ask it of others. Take breaks. Break it down into manageable clips. Understand what can be edited & what can’t. Do as many takes as it takes. Do not settle for just OK, but do not strive for perfection either.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 6Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 31. SAMPLE Excerpt from a Shooting ScriptClip Visual Content NotesClip 6 Video of Greg Once you’ve zeroed in on the one person you’re speaking to, you’re more likely to sound conversational and natural. However, if you’ve done your planning, you probably have a script or at least an outline that you’re working from. So, how do you follow your script, engage your friend AND sound conversational? The answer lies in not memorizing your script or using an ad hoc teleprompter. While these ideas may seem logical, they don’t work because: • Stiff • Unnatural • Reading Instead make notes for yourself and improvise around them. Now, I’m not recommending never writing out a script. The exercise of writing it out can really help you focus your thoughts, surface new ideas and logically string concepts together across multiple video clips. But once the camera is rolling you need to abandon the script, scribble notes, place them within eye sight, and improvise your way around them.Clip 7 Cut, fade back Here’s how I do it. Pull script into view to Greg • For me, no more than 2/3 page and refer to it. • Before camera rolls I look at my script Should I write on the Here’s my script for this shot you’re watching right now. I have it right here out of the shot so I can white board? Just hold reference it at any time. But before we turned on the camera, I jotted down some notes on a white board a marker? and placed it right there (point to white board placement). Before hitting record: • Review notes, get my head together • Engage the camera • Go Sometimes I can get through the entire clip without any trouble. Other times I need to sneak a peek. (Show example.) It should look like I’m looking into thin air and grabbing a thought. But it’s a learned skill, and I’m not always successful. Experiment and see what works for you.Clip 8 Fade through As I’ve said, the goal should be to sound conversational. This can be challenging if your script is too long. Use this fade as an black, back to Now, you may have noticed that we just faded through black in the edit. This is a technique you can use example of what to do Greg to cut your script into more manageable chunks, which will make you more likely to sound conversational to break a clip into and natural. manageable chunks.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 7Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 32. About your Presenter – Greg Owen-Boger Greg Owen-Boger is the Vice President of Turpin Communication, a presentation and facilitation skills training company based in Chicago. Schooled in management and the performing arts, Greg brings a diverse set of skills and experiences to the organization. He joined Turpin in 1995 as a camera man and quickly worked his way up. He now serves as a communication trainer and coach for Turpin’s largest clients. He also oversees all aspects of their E-Learning (www.onlinepresentationskillstraining.com) and blended learning (www.turpincommunication.com/ecoach.php) platforms including instructional design, script development, production and LMS deployment. He also appears on camera as a subject matter expert.Most recently Greg partnered with KinetiCast, a unique sales video/presentation tool, to provide theirusers with practical online how-to videos to help them shoot better on-the-fly video presentations.greg@turpincommunication.com773-256-9406www.linkedin.com/in/gregowenbogerFounded in 1992, Turpin Communication is a presentation and facilitation training company based inChicago.We take a personalized and comprehensive skill-building approach to our work. This means thatlearners always work on their own real-life content, and over the course of a 12-month blendedlearning program, concepts are introduced, practiced, refined and reinforced.Here are some guiding principles woven into the fabric of all we do.Business presentations are not the same things as speeches. Presentations should be thoughtof more as “orderly conversations.” Orderly because they should be carefully planned; conversationalbecause they need to have the lively quality of spontaneous dialogue.Everyone has what we call a “Default Approach” to presenting. Some default to the orderlyside of presenting, others to the conversational. Understanding one’s default – and makingappropriate adjustments to make up for the associated weaknesses – is key to a presenter’s success.Engaging listeners, that is calming the racing mind and connecting with the individuals in the room,is critical to every presenter’s ability to successfully manage all of their orderly conversations. Whenpresenters are engaged, their natural skills and personalities emerge. They are self-aware and able tomanage the complexities of presenting.Facilitating is an extension of presenting. No matter the purpose behind any facilitated event, thecontent needs to be organized and introduced appropriately. Doing so requires the same skills aspresenting. Therefore, facilitation sessions begin by developing those skills. TurpinCommunication.com OnlinePresentationSkillsTraining.com Facebook.com/TurpinCommunicationDown Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 8Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 33. Down & Dirty Video:Practical strategies for producing engaging E-Learning video on a budget Video Production Basics Video Production 1. Start with a well-planned instructional design Principles for with clear goals & learning objectives E-Learning 2. Consider your brand Then: • Identify video opportunities to support #1 • Shoot video consistent with #2 • Eliminate distractions for both Camera Type, Placement When choosing a camera, consider: Angle & Framing • Standard vs. high definition • Media storage and communication with editing software • Audio quality & capture method Place the camera a good distance from you and zoom in. Putting the camera too close can distort your facial features. Angle the camera so that it is at eye level, which is the most natural placement from the viewer’s perspective. Placing it too high or too low can lookThe rule of thirds strange. Frame yourself in an interesting way. Follow the rule of thirds and position your head within the frame at roughly the intersection of the lines in the illustration. Allow some headroom and looking room so you don’t appear cramped. Adjust the tilt so that horizontal and vertical lines in the shot appear level.Find your focus. Be yourself. Only better.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 1Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 34. Lighting that Flatters Flatter your facial features by lighting yourself well. It’s best to start with a dark room and build a 3-point lighting plot from scratch.3-point lighting Point 1: The Key Light (brightest) should be positioned behind the camera, off to the side and at roughly a 45 degree angle above your head. Point 2: The Fill Light (second brightest) should be placed on the opposite side of the camera and used to fill in the shadows created by the Key. It too should be about 45 degrees above your head. Point 3: The Back Light (dimmest) should be placed behind and to one side. It provides dimension to the video by lighting your hair and shoulders. Diffuse the light to soften the shadows. Use diffusion materials purchased from a camera store or improvise using parchment paper or vellum. Everyone’s features are different, so start with the 3- point lighting scheme and make adjustments for your particular situation. Audio Capture Built-in microphones may not be good enough. If using an external microphone, place it a natural distance from you to capture the volume level suggested by the camera. It should not be in the shot nor create shadows. If the audio you capture has a thin quality or has faint echoes, do what you can to soften the hard surfaces in the room. Hang acoustic foam panels or draperies on the walls, and lay down carpeting.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 2Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 35. Setting Up Your Studio Consider the best location to meet your goals. Shooting in the learner’s natural habitat is often a good way to connect with them. • Should you be in an office or out in the field? • Would it be better to be in a branded or green screen studio? Decorate your set to work in harmony with your brand, try to keep things balanced and eliminate distractions. Avoid sets that look too sterile, staged or cluttered. Wardrobe, Hair & Keep your appearance appropriate for your Complexion organization, choose items that flatter and eliminate distractions. When choosing your wardrobe, opt for solids that contrast with each other and your surroundings. Avoid: • Loud patterns and stripes, which can cause video “noise.” • White, which can negatively affect the white balance setting on the camera. Pay attention to your hair. Keep it off your face, and get rid of fly-aways. The camera and lighting can make your complexion look unattractive. Improve your skin’s appearance by applying a light layer of skin-tone powder. Reapply often to tone down shine created by the lights. Editing When editing, keep things simple. Avoid the temptation to use fancy transitions and effects. They do little to advance the learning, and call too much attention to themselves. When shopping for editing software, look for the ability to: • Export and work with course-building software, SCORM and LMS • Import a variety of video & image formats • Run multiple video & audio tracks • Edit sound including noise reduction • Add text & titlesDown Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 3Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 36. Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 4Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 37. Engaging Learners On Camera Find your focus. The key to looking & sounding natural on video is to Be yourself. be engaged. This means you need to be in control of your Only better. thoughts, your movement and your speech. To do this, work hard to: • Find your focus: Pause to calm your racing mind and to think clearly. • Be yourself: Make sure the person captured on video looks, sounds and acts like the most professional and conversational version of the real you. • Only better: You may need to adapt to the complexities of video by slowing your speaking pace, moving less, smiling more, and so on. Identify Who You Are Address a single person with whom you have a Talking To friendly relationship. Doing this, rather than speaking to a faceless group of people, will make your video feel more personal. It will also positively affect your tone, enthusiasm and word choice. Make solid eye contact with the camera’s lens. Avoid looking to the side or beyond the camera; both will make you appear as if you’re disengaged or reading from a script.Find your focus. Be yourself. Only better.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 5Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 38. Be Clear, Concise, The first step to a successful video shoot is to start with an Conversational, Not excellent instructional design from which a script or Scripted detailed outline can be written. (see handout, page 7) Then, the key to sounding spontaneous and conversational is to wean yourself off of it by creating notes from which you can improvise. We recommend this process. Start with Excellent Instructional Design Write Script or Detailed Outline Gather Thoughts, Make Connections Create Notes as Cue Cards Review Out Loud Smile, Engage Your Friend, and… Action!Other Recommendations Do not use a teleprompter. Learn to sneak a peek. Be patient & ask it of others. Take breaks. Break it down into manageable clips. Understand what can be edited & what can’t. Do as many takes as it takes. Do not settle for just OK, but do not strive for perfection either.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 6Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 39. SAMPLE Excerpt from a Shooting ScriptClip Visual Content NotesClip 6 Video of Greg Once you’ve zeroed in on the one person you’re speaking to, you’re more likely to sound conversational and natural. However, if you’ve done your planning, you probably have a script or at least an outline that you’re working from. So, how do you follow your script, engage your friend AND sound conversational? The answer lies in not memorizing your script or using an ad hoc teleprompter. While these ideas may seem logical, they don’t work because: • Stiff • Unnatural • Reading Instead make notes for yourself and improvise around them. Now, I’m not recommending never writing out a script. The exercise of writing it out can really help you focus your thoughts, surface new ideas and logically string concepts together across multiple video clips. But once the camera is rolling you need to abandon the script, scribble notes, place them within eye sight, and improvise your way around them.Clip 7 Cut, fade back Here’s how I do it. Pull script into view to Greg • For me, no more than 2/3 page and refer to it. • Before camera rolls I look at my script Should I write on the Here’s my script for this shot you’re watching right now. I have it right here out of the shot so I can white board? Just hold reference it at any time. But before we turned on the camera, I jotted down some notes on a white board a marker? and placed it right there (point to white board placement). Before hitting record: • Review notes, get my head together • Engage the camera • Go Sometimes I can get through the entire clip without any trouble. Other times I need to sneak a peek. (Show example.) It should look like I’m looking into thin air and grabbing a thought. But it’s a learned skill, and I’m not always successful. Experiment and see what works for you.Clip 8 Fade through As I’ve said, the goal should be to sound conversational. This can be challenging if your script is too long. Use this fade as an black, back to Now, you may have noticed that we just faded through black in the edit. This is a technique you can use example of what to do Greg to cut your script into more manageable chunks, which will make you more likely to sound conversational to break a clip into and natural. manageable chunks.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 7Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 40. About your Presenter – Greg Owen-Boger Greg Owen-Boger is the Vice President of Turpin Communication, a presentation and facilitation skills training company based in Chicago. Schooled in management and the performing arts, Greg brings a diverse set of skills and experiences to the organization. He joined Turpin in 1995 as a camera man and quickly worked his way up. He now serves as a communication trainer and coach for Turpin’s largest clients. He also oversees all aspects of their E-Learning (www.onlinepresentationskillstraining.com) and blended learning (www.turpincommunication.com/ecoach.php) platforms including instructional design, script development, production and LMS deployment. He also appears on camera as a subject matter expert.Most recently Greg partnered with KinetiCast, a unique sales video/presentation tool, to provide theirusers with practical online how-to videos to help them shoot better on-the-fly video presentations.greg@turpincommunication.com773-256-9406www.linkedin.com/in/gregowenbogerFounded in 1992, Turpin Communication is a presentation and facilitation training company based inChicago.We take a personalized and comprehensive skill-building approach to our work. This means thatlearners always work on their own real-life content, and over the course of a 12-month blendedlearning program, concepts are introduced, practiced, refined and reinforced.Here are some guiding principles woven into the fabric of all we do.Business presentations are not the same things as speeches. Presentations should be thoughtof more as “orderly conversations.” Orderly because they should be carefully planned; conversationalbecause they need to have the lively quality of spontaneous dialogue.Everyone has what we call a “Default Approach” to presenting. Some default to the orderlyside of presenting, others to the conversational. Understanding one’s default – and makingappropriate adjustments to make up for the associated weaknesses – is key to a presenter’s success.Engaging listeners, that is calming the racing mind and connecting with the individuals in the room,is critical to every presenter’s ability to successfully manage all of their orderly conversations. Whenpresenters are engaged, their natural skills and personalities emerge. They are self-aware and able tomanage the complexities of presenting.Facilitating is an extension of presenting. No matter the purpose behind any facilitated event, thecontent needs to be organized and introduced appropriately. Doing so requires the same skills aspresenting. Therefore, facilitation sessions begin by developing those skills. TurpinCommunication.com OnlinePresentationSkillsTraining.com Facebook.com/TurpinCommunicationDown Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 8Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 41. Down & Dirty Video:Practical strategies for producing engaging E-Learning video on a budget Video Production Basics Video Production 1. Start with a well-planned instructional design Principles for with clear goals & learning objectives E-Learning 2. Consider your brand Then: • Identify video opportunities to support #1 • Shoot video consistent with #2 • Eliminate distractions for both Camera Type, Placement When choosing a camera, consider: Angle & Framing • Standard vs. high definition • Media storage and communication with editing software • Audio quality & capture method Place the camera a good distance from you and zoom in. Putting the camera too close can distort your facial features. Angle the camera so that it is at eye level, which is the most natural placement from the viewer’s perspective. Placing it too high or too low can lookThe rule of thirds strange. Frame yourself in an interesting way. Follow the rule of thirds and position your head within the frame at roughly the intersection of the lines in the illustration. Allow some headroom and looking room so you don’t appear cramped. Adjust the tilt so that horizontal and vertical lines in the shot appear level.Find your focus. Be yourself. Only better.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 1Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 42. Lighting that Flatters Flatter your facial features by lighting yourself well. It’s best to start with a dark room and build a 3-point lighting plot from scratch.3-point lighting Point 1: The Key Light (brightest) should be positioned behind the camera, off to the side and at roughly a 45 degree angle above your head. Point 2: The Fill Light (second brightest) should be placed on the opposite side of the camera and used to fill in the shadows created by the Key. It too should be about 45 degrees above your head. Point 3: The Back Light (dimmest) should be placed behind and to one side. It provides dimension to the video by lighting your hair and shoulders. Diffuse the light to soften the shadows. Use diffusion materials purchased from a camera store or improvise using parchment paper or vellum. Everyone’s features are different, so start with the 3- point lighting scheme and make adjustments for your particular situation. Audio Capture Built-in microphones may not be good enough. If using an external microphone, place it a natural distance from you to capture the volume level suggested by the camera. It should not be in the shot nor create shadows. If the audio you capture has a thin quality or has faint echoes, do what you can to soften the hard surfaces in the room. Hang acoustic foam panels or draperies on the walls, and lay down carpeting.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 2Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 43. Setting Up Your Studio Consider the best location to meet your goals. Shooting in the learner’s natural habitat is often a good way to connect with them. • Should you be in an office or out in the field? • Would it be better to be in a branded or green screen studio? Decorate your set to work in harmony with your brand, try to keep things balanced and eliminate distractions. Avoid sets that look too sterile, staged or cluttered. Wardrobe, Hair & Keep your appearance appropriate for your Complexion organization, choose items that flatter and eliminate distractions. When choosing your wardrobe, opt for solids that contrast with each other and your surroundings. Avoid: • Loud patterns and stripes, which can cause video “noise.” • White, which can negatively affect the white balance setting on the camera. Pay attention to your hair. Keep it off your face, and get rid of fly-aways. The camera and lighting can make your complexion look unattractive. Improve your skin’s appearance by applying a light layer of skin-tone powder. Reapply often to tone down shine created by the lights. Editing When editing, keep things simple. Avoid the temptation to use fancy transitions and effects. They do little to advance the learning, and call too much attention to themselves. When shopping for editing software, look for the ability to: • Export and work with course-building software, SCORM and LMS • Import a variety of video & image formats • Run multiple video & audio tracks • Edit sound including noise reduction • Add text & titlesDown Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 3Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 44. Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 4Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 45. Engaging Learners On Camera Find your focus. The key to looking & sounding natural on video is to Be yourself. be engaged. This means you need to be in control of your Only better. thoughts, your movement and your speech. To do this, work hard to: • Find your focus: Pause to calm your racing mind and to think clearly. • Be yourself: Make sure the person captured on video looks, sounds and acts like the most professional and conversational version of the real you. • Only better: You may need to adapt to the complexities of video by slowing your speaking pace, moving less, smiling more, and so on. Identify Who You Are Address a single person with whom you have a Talking To friendly relationship. Doing this, rather than speaking to a faceless group of people, will make your video feel more personal. It will also positively affect your tone, enthusiasm and word choice. Make solid eye contact with the camera’s lens. Avoid looking to the side or beyond the camera; both will make you appear as if you’re disengaged or reading from a script.Find your focus. Be yourself. Only better.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 5Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 46. Be Clear, Concise, The first step to a successful video shoot is to start with an Conversational, Not excellent instructional design from which a script or Scripted detailed outline can be written. (see handout, page 7) Then, the key to sounding spontaneous and conversational is to wean yourself off of it by creating notes from which you can improvise. We recommend this process. Start with Excellent Instructional Design Write Script or Detailed Outline Gather Thoughts, Make Connections Create Notes as Cue Cards Review Out Loud Smile, Engage Your Friend, and… Action!Other Recommendations Do not use a teleprompter. Learn to sneak a peek. Be patient & ask it of others. Take breaks. Break it down into manageable clips. Understand what can be edited & what can’t. Do as many takes as it takes. Do not settle for just OK, but do not strive for perfection either.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 6Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 47. SAMPLE Excerpt from a Shooting ScriptClip Visual Content NotesClip 6 Video of Greg Once you’ve zeroed in on the one person you’re speaking to, you’re more likely to sound conversational and natural. However, if you’ve done your planning, you probably have a script or at least an outline that you’re working from. So, how do you follow your script, engage your friend AND sound conversational? The answer lies in not memorizing your script or using an ad hoc teleprompter. While these ideas may seem logical, they don’t work because: • Stiff • Unnatural • Reading Instead make notes for yourself and improvise around them. Now, I’m not recommending never writing out a script. The exercise of writing it out can really help you focus your thoughts, surface new ideas and logically string concepts together across multiple video clips. But once the camera is rolling you need to abandon the script, scribble notes, place them within eye sight, and improvise your way around them.Clip 7 Cut, fade back Here’s how I do it. Pull script into view to Greg • For me, no more than 2/3 page and refer to it. • Before camera rolls I look at my script Should I write on the Here’s my script for this shot you’re watching right now. I have it right here out of the shot so I can white board? Just hold reference it at any time. But before we turned on the camera, I jotted down some notes on a white board a marker? and placed it right there (point to white board placement). Before hitting record: • Review notes, get my head together • Engage the camera • Go Sometimes I can get through the entire clip without any trouble. Other times I need to sneak a peek. (Show example.) It should look like I’m looking into thin air and grabbing a thought. But it’s a learned skill, and I’m not always successful. Experiment and see what works for you.Clip 8 Fade through As I’ve said, the goal should be to sound conversational. This can be challenging if your script is too long. Use this fade as an black, back to Now, you may have noticed that we just faded through black in the edit. This is a technique you can use example of what to do Greg to cut your script into more manageable chunks, which will make you more likely to sound conversational to break a clip into and natural. manageable chunks.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 7Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 48. About your Presenter – Greg Owen-Boger Greg Owen-Boger is the Vice President of Turpin Communication, a presentation and facilitation skills training company based in Chicago. Schooled in management and the performing arts, Greg brings a diverse set of skills and experiences to the organization. He joined Turpin in 1995 as a camera man and quickly worked his way up. He now serves as a communication trainer and coach for Turpin’s largest clients. He also oversees all aspects of their E-Learning (www.onlinepresentationskillstraining.com) and blended learning (www.turpincommunication.com/ecoach.php) platforms including instructional design, script development, production and LMS deployment. He also appears on camera as a subject matter expert.Most recently Greg partnered with KinetiCast, a unique sales video/presentation tool, to provide theirusers with practical online how-to videos to help them shoot better on-the-fly video presentations.greg@turpincommunication.com773-256-9406www.linkedin.com/in/gregowenbogerFounded in 1992, Turpin Communication is a presentation and facilitation training company based inChicago.We take a personalized and comprehensive skill-building approach to our work. This means thatlearners always work on their own real-life content, and over the course of a 12-month blendedlearning program, concepts are introduced, practiced, refined and reinforced.Here are some guiding principles woven into the fabric of all we do.Business presentations are not the same things as speeches. Presentations should be thoughtof more as “orderly conversations.” Orderly because they should be carefully planned; conversationalbecause they need to have the lively quality of spontaneous dialogue.Everyone has what we call a “Default Approach” to presenting. Some default to the orderlyside of presenting, others to the conversational. Understanding one’s default – and makingappropriate adjustments to make up for the associated weaknesses – is key to a presenter’s success.Engaging listeners, that is calming the racing mind and connecting with the individuals in the room,is critical to every presenter’s ability to successfully manage all of their orderly conversations. Whenpresenters are engaged, their natural skills and personalities emerge. They are self-aware and able tomanage the complexities of presenting.Facilitating is an extension of presenting. No matter the purpose behind any facilitated event, thecontent needs to be organized and introduced appropriately. Doing so requires the same skills aspresenting. Therefore, facilitation sessions begin by developing those skills. TurpinCommunication.com OnlinePresentationSkillsTraining.com Facebook.com/TurpinCommunicationDown Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 8Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 49. Down & Dirty Video:Practical strategies for producing engaging E-Learning video on a budget Video Production Basics Video Production 1. Start with a well-planned instructional design Principles for with clear goals & learning objectives E-Learning 2. Consider your brand Then: • Identify video opportunities to support #1 • Shoot video consistent with #2 • Eliminate distractions for both Camera Type, Placement When choosing a camera, consider: Angle & Framing • Standard vs. high definition • Media storage and communication with editing software • Audio quality & capture method Place the camera a good distance from you and zoom in. Putting the camera too close can distort your facial features. Angle the camera so that it is at eye level, which is the most natural placement from the viewer’s perspective. Placing it too high or too low can lookThe rule of thirds strange. Frame yourself in an interesting way. Follow the rule of thirds and position your head within the frame at roughly the intersection of the lines in the illustration. Allow some headroom and looking room so you don’t appear cramped. Adjust the tilt so that horizontal and vertical lines in the shot appear level.Find your focus. Be yourself. Only better.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 1Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 50. Lighting that Flatters Flatter your facial features by lighting yourself well. It’s best to start with a dark room and build a 3-point lighting plot from scratch.3-point lighting Point 1: The Key Light (brightest) should be positioned behind the camera, off to the side and at roughly a 45 degree angle above your head. Point 2: The Fill Light (second brightest) should be placed on the opposite side of the camera and used to fill in the shadows created by the Key. It too should be about 45 degrees above your head. Point 3: The Back Light (dimmest) should be placed behind and to one side. It provides dimension to the video by lighting your hair and shoulders. Diffuse the light to soften the shadows. Use diffusion materials purchased from a camera store or improvise using parchment paper or vellum. Everyone’s features are different, so start with the 3- point lighting scheme and make adjustments for your particular situation. Audio Capture Built-in microphones may not be good enough. If using an external microphone, place it a natural distance from you to capture the volume level suggested by the camera. It should not be in the shot nor create shadows. If the audio you capture has a thin quality or has faint echoes, do what you can to soften the hard surfaces in the room. Hang acoustic foam panels or draperies on the walls, and lay down carpeting.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 2Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 51. Setting Up Your Studio Consider the best location to meet your goals. Shooting in the learner’s natural habitat is often a good way to connect with them. • Should you be in an office or out in the field? • Would it be better to be in a branded or green screen studio? Decorate your set to work in harmony with your brand, try to keep things balanced and eliminate distractions. Avoid sets that look too sterile, staged or cluttered. Wardrobe, Hair & Keep your appearance appropriate for your Complexion organization, choose items that flatter and eliminate distractions. When choosing your wardrobe, opt for solids that contrast with each other and your surroundings. Avoid: • Loud patterns and stripes, which can cause video “noise.” • White, which can negatively affect the white balance setting on the camera. Pay attention to your hair. Keep it off your face, and get rid of fly-aways. The camera and lighting can make your complexion look unattractive. Improve your skin’s appearance by applying a light layer of skin-tone powder. Reapply often to tone down shine created by the lights. Editing When editing, keep things simple. Avoid the temptation to use fancy transitions and effects. They do little to advance the learning, and call too much attention to themselves. When shopping for editing software, look for the ability to: • Export and work with course-building software, SCORM and LMS • Import a variety of video & image formats • Run multiple video & audio tracks • Edit sound including noise reduction • Add text & titlesDown Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 3Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 52. Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 4Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 53. Engaging Learners On Camera Find your focus. The key to looking & sounding natural on video is to Be yourself. be engaged. This means you need to be in control of your Only better. thoughts, your movement and your speech. To do this, work hard to: • Find your focus: Pause to calm your racing mind and to think clearly. • Be yourself: Make sure the person captured on video looks, sounds and acts like the most professional and conversational version of the real you. • Only better: You may need to adapt to the complexities of video by slowing your speaking pace, moving less, smiling more, and so on. Identify Who You Are Address a single person with whom you have a Talking To friendly relationship. Doing this, rather than speaking to a faceless group of people, will make your video feel more personal. It will also positively affect your tone, enthusiasm and word choice. Make solid eye contact with the camera’s lens. Avoid looking to the side or beyond the camera; both will make you appear as if you’re disengaged or reading from a script.Find your focus. Be yourself. Only better.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 5Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 54. Be Clear, Concise, The first step to a successful video shoot is to start with an Conversational, Not excellent instructional design from which a script or Scripted detailed outline can be written. (see handout, page 7) Then, the key to sounding spontaneous and conversational is to wean yourself off of it by creating notes from which you can improvise. We recommend this process. Start with Excellent Instructional Design Write Script or Detailed Outline Gather Thoughts, Make Connections Create Notes as Cue Cards Review Out Loud Smile, Engage Your Friend, and… Action!Other Recommendations Do not use a teleprompter. Learn to sneak a peek. Be patient & ask it of others. Take breaks. Break it down into manageable clips. Understand what can be edited & what can’t. Do as many takes as it takes. Do not settle for just OK, but do not strive for perfection either.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 6Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 55. SAMPLE Excerpt from a Shooting ScriptClip Visual Content NotesClip 6 Video of Greg Once you’ve zeroed in on the one person you’re speaking to, you’re more likely to sound conversational and natural. However, if you’ve done your planning, you probably have a script or at least an outline that you’re working from. So, how do you follow your script, engage your friend AND sound conversational? The answer lies in not memorizing your script or using an ad hoc teleprompter. While these ideas may seem logical, they don’t work because: • Stiff • Unnatural • Reading Instead make notes for yourself and improvise around them. Now, I’m not recommending never writing out a script. The exercise of writing it out can really help you focus your thoughts, surface new ideas and logically string concepts together across multiple video clips. But once the camera is rolling you need to abandon the script, scribble notes, place them within eye sight, and improvise your way around them.Clip 7 Cut, fade back Here’s how I do it. Pull script into view to Greg • For me, no more than 2/3 page and refer to it. • Before camera rolls I look at my script Should I write on the Here’s my script for this shot you’re watching right now. I have it right here out of the shot so I can white board? Just hold reference it at any time. But before we turned on the camera, I jotted down some notes on a white board a marker? and placed it right there (point to white board placement). Before hitting record: • Review notes, get my head together • Engage the camera • Go Sometimes I can get through the entire clip without any trouble. Other times I need to sneak a peek. (Show example.) It should look like I’m looking into thin air and grabbing a thought. But it’s a learned skill, and I’m not always successful. Experiment and see what works for you.Clip 8 Fade through As I’ve said, the goal should be to sound conversational. This can be challenging if your script is too long. Use this fade as an black, back to Now, you may have noticed that we just faded through black in the edit. This is a technique you can use example of what to do Greg to cut your script into more manageable chunks, which will make you more likely to sound conversational to break a clip into and natural. manageable chunks.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 7Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 56. About your Presenter – Greg Owen-Boger Greg Owen-Boger is the Vice President of Turpin Communication, a presentation and facilitation skills training company based in Chicago. Schooled in management and the performing arts, Greg brings a diverse set of skills and experiences to the organization. He joined Turpin in 1995 as a camera man and quickly worked his way up. He now serves as a communication trainer and coach for Turpin’s largest clients. He also oversees all aspects of their E-Learning (www.onlinepresentationskillstraining.com) and blended learning (www.turpincommunication.com/ecoach.php) platforms including instructional design, script development, production and LMS deployment. He also appears on camera as a subject matter expert.Most recently Greg partnered with KinetiCast, a unique sales video/presentation tool, to provide theirusers with practical online how-to videos to help them shoot better on-the-fly video presentations.greg@turpincommunication.com773-256-9406www.linkedin.com/in/gregowenbogerFounded in 1992, Turpin Communication is a presentation and facilitation training company based inChicago.We take a personalized and comprehensive skill-building approach to our work. This means thatlearners always work on their own real-life content, and over the course of a 12-month blendedlearning program, concepts are introduced, practiced, refined and reinforced.Here are some guiding principles woven into the fabric of all we do.Business presentations are not the same things as speeches. Presentations should be thoughtof more as “orderly conversations.” Orderly because they should be carefully planned; conversationalbecause they need to have the lively quality of spontaneous dialogue.Everyone has what we call a “Default Approach” to presenting. Some default to the orderlyside of presenting, others to the conversational. Understanding one’s default – and makingappropriate adjustments to make up for the associated weaknesses – is key to a presenter’s success.Engaging listeners, that is calming the racing mind and connecting with the individuals in the room,is critical to every presenter’s ability to successfully manage all of their orderly conversations. Whenpresenters are engaged, their natural skills and personalities emerge. They are self-aware and able tomanage the complexities of presenting.Facilitating is an extension of presenting. No matter the purpose behind any facilitated event, thecontent needs to be organized and introduced appropriately. Doing so requires the same skills aspresenting. Therefore, facilitation sessions begin by developing those skills. TurpinCommunication.com OnlinePresentationSkillsTraining.com Facebook.com/TurpinCommunicationDown Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 8Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 57. Down & Dirty Video:Practical strategies for producing engaging E-Learning video on a budget Video Production Basics Video Production 1. Start with a well-planned instructional design Principles for with clear goals & learning objectives E-Learning 2. Consider your brand Then: • Identify video opportunities to support #1 • Shoot video consistent with #2 • Eliminate distractions for both Camera Type, Placement When choosing a camera, consider: Angle & Framing • Standard vs. high definition • Media storage and communication with editing software • Audio quality & capture method Place the camera a good distance from you and zoom in. Putting the camera too close can distort your facial features. Angle the camera so that it is at eye level, which is the most natural placement from the viewer’s perspective. Placing it too high or too low can lookThe rule of thirds strange. Frame yourself in an interesting way. Follow the rule of thirds and position your head within the frame at roughly the intersection of the lines in the illustration. Allow some headroom and looking room so you don’t appear cramped. Adjust the tilt so that horizontal and vertical lines in the shot appear level.Find your focus. Be yourself. Only better.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 1Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 58. Lighting that Flatters Flatter your facial features by lighting yourself well. It’s best to start with a dark room and build a 3-point lighting plot from scratch.3-point lighting Point 1: The Key Light (brightest) should be positioned behind the camera, off to the side and at roughly a 45 degree angle above your head. Point 2: The Fill Light (second brightest) should be placed on the opposite side of the camera and used to fill in the shadows created by the Key. It too should be about 45 degrees above your head. Point 3: The Back Light (dimmest) should be placed behind and to one side. It provides dimension to the video by lighting your hair and shoulders. Diffuse the light to soften the shadows. Use diffusion materials purchased from a camera store or improvise using parchment paper or vellum. Everyone’s features are different, so start with the 3- point lighting scheme and make adjustments for your particular situation. Audio Capture Built-in microphones may not be good enough. If using an external microphone, place it a natural distance from you to capture the volume level suggested by the camera. It should not be in the shot nor create shadows. If the audio you capture has a thin quality or has faint echoes, do what you can to soften the hard surfaces in the room. Hang acoustic foam panels or draperies on the walls, and lay down carpeting.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 2Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 59. Setting Up Your Studio Consider the best location to meet your goals. Shooting in the learner’s natural habitat is often a good way to connect with them. • Should you be in an office or out in the field? • Would it be better to be in a branded or green screen studio? Decorate your set to work in harmony with your brand, try to keep things balanced and eliminate distractions. Avoid sets that look too sterile, staged or cluttered. Wardrobe, Hair & Keep your appearance appropriate for your Complexion organization, choose items that flatter and eliminate distractions. When choosing your wardrobe, opt for solids that contrast with each other and your surroundings. Avoid: • Loud patterns and stripes, which can cause video “noise.” • White, which can negatively affect the white balance setting on the camera. Pay attention to your hair. Keep it off your face, and get rid of fly-aways. The camera and lighting can make your complexion look unattractive. Improve your skin’s appearance by applying a light layer of skin-tone powder. Reapply often to tone down shine created by the lights. Editing When editing, keep things simple. Avoid the temptation to use fancy transitions and effects. They do little to advance the learning, and call too much attention to themselves. When shopping for editing software, look for the ability to: • Export and work with course-building software, SCORM and LMS • Import a variety of video & image formats • Run multiple video & audio tracks • Edit sound including noise reduction • Add text & titlesDown Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 3Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 60. Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 4Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 61. Engaging Learners On Camera Find your focus. The key to looking & sounding natural on video is to Be yourself. be engaged. This means you need to be in control of your Only better. thoughts, your movement and your speech. To do this, work hard to: • Find your focus: Pause to calm your racing mind and to think clearly. • Be yourself: Make sure the person captured on video looks, sounds and acts like the most professional and conversational version of the real you. • Only better: You may need to adapt to the complexities of video by slowing your speaking pace, moving less, smiling more, and so on. Identify Who You Are Address a single person with whom you have a Talking To friendly relationship. Doing this, rather than speaking to a faceless group of people, will make your video feel more personal. It will also positively affect your tone, enthusiasm and word choice. Make solid eye contact with the camera’s lens. Avoid looking to the side or beyond the camera; both will make you appear as if you’re disengaged or reading from a script.Find your focus. Be yourself. Only better.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 5Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 62. Be Clear, Concise, The first step to a successful video shoot is to start with an Conversational, Not excellent instructional design from which a script or Scripted detailed outline can be written. (see handout, page 7) Then, the key to sounding spontaneous and conversational is to wean yourself off of it by creating notes from which you can improvise. We recommend this process. Start with Excellent Instructional Design Write Script or Detailed Outline Gather Thoughts, Make Connections Create Notes as Cue Cards Review Out Loud Smile, Engage Your Friend, and… Action!Other Recommendations Do not use a teleprompter. Learn to sneak a peek. Be patient & ask it of others. Take breaks. Break it down into manageable clips. Understand what can be edited & what can’t. Do as many takes as it takes. Do not settle for just OK, but do not strive for perfection either.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 6Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 63. SAMPLE Excerpt from a Shooting ScriptClip Visual Content NotesClip 6 Video of Greg Once you’ve zeroed in on the one person you’re speaking to, you’re more likely to sound conversational and natural. However, if you’ve done your planning, you probably have a script or at least an outline that you’re working from. So, how do you follow your script, engage your friend AND sound conversational? The answer lies in not memorizing your script or using an ad hoc teleprompter. While these ideas may seem logical, they don’t work because: • Stiff • Unnatural • Reading Instead make notes for yourself and improvise around them. Now, I’m not recommending never writing out a script. The exercise of writing it out can really help you focus your thoughts, surface new ideas and logically string concepts together across multiple video clips. But once the camera is rolling you need to abandon the script, scribble notes, place them within eye sight, and improvise your way around them.Clip 7 Cut, fade back Here’s how I do it. Pull script into view to Greg • For me, no more than 2/3 page and refer to it. • Before camera rolls I look at my script Should I write on the Here’s my script for this shot you’re watching right now. I have it right here out of the shot so I can white board? Just hold reference it at any time. But before we turned on the camera, I jotted down some notes on a white board a marker? and placed it right there (point to white board placement). Before hitting record: • Review notes, get my head together • Engage the camera • Go Sometimes I can get through the entire clip without any trouble. Other times I need to sneak a peek. (Show example.) It should look like I’m looking into thin air and grabbing a thought. But it’s a learned skill, and I’m not always successful. Experiment and see what works for you.Clip 8 Fade through As I’ve said, the goal should be to sound conversational. This can be challenging if your script is too long. Use this fade as an black, back to Now, you may have noticed that we just faded through black in the edit. This is a technique you can use example of what to do Greg to cut your script into more manageable chunks, which will make you more likely to sound conversational to break a clip into and natural. manageable chunks.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 7Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 64. About your Presenter – Greg Owen-Boger Greg Owen-Boger is the Vice President of Turpin Communication, a presentation and facilitation skills training company based in Chicago. Schooled in management and the performing arts, Greg brings a diverse set of skills and experiences to the organization. He joined Turpin in 1995 as a camera man and quickly worked his way up. He now serves as a communication trainer and coach for Turpin’s largest clients. He also oversees all aspects of their E-Learning (www.onlinepresentationskillstraining.com) and blended learning (www.turpincommunication.com/ecoach.php) platforms including instructional design, script development, production and LMS deployment. He also appears on camera as a subject matter expert.Most recently Greg partnered with KinetiCast, a unique sales video/presentation tool, to provide theirusers with practical online how-to videos to help them shoot better on-the-fly video presentations.greg@turpincommunication.com773-256-9406www.linkedin.com/in/gregowenbogerFounded in 1992, Turpin Communication is a presentation and facilitation training company based inChicago.We take a personalized and comprehensive skill-building approach to our work. This means thatlearners always work on their own real-life content, and over the course of a 12-month blendedlearning program, concepts are introduced, practiced, refined and reinforced.Here are some guiding principles woven into the fabric of all we do.Business presentations are not the same things as speeches. Presentations should be thoughtof more as “orderly conversations.” Orderly because they should be carefully planned; conversationalbecause they need to have the lively quality of spontaneous dialogue.Everyone has what we call a “Default Approach” to presenting. Some default to the orderlyside of presenting, others to the conversational. Understanding one’s default – and makingappropriate adjustments to make up for the associated weaknesses – is key to a presenter’s success.Engaging listeners, that is calming the racing mind and connecting with the individuals in the room,is critical to every presenter’s ability to successfully manage all of their orderly conversations. Whenpresenters are engaged, their natural skills and personalities emerge. They are self-aware and able tomanage the complexities of presenting.Facilitating is an extension of presenting. No matter the purpose behind any facilitated event, thecontent needs to be organized and introduced appropriately. Doing so requires the same skills aspresenting. Therefore, facilitation sessions begin by developing those skills. TurpinCommunication.com OnlinePresentationSkillsTraining.com Facebook.com/TurpinCommunicationDown Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 8Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 65. Down & Dirty Video:Practical strategies for producing engaging E-Learning video on a budget Video Production Basics Video Production 1. Start with a well-planned instructional design Principles for with clear goals & learning objectives E-Learning 2. Consider your brand Then: • Identify video opportunities to support #1 • Shoot video consistent with #2 • Eliminate distractions for both Camera Type, Placement When choosing a camera, consider: Angle & Framing • Standard vs. high definition • Media storage and communication with editing software • Audio quality & capture method Place the camera a good distance from you and zoom in. Putting the camera too close can distort your facial features. Angle the camera so that it is at eye level, which is the most natural placement from the viewer’s perspective. Placing it too high or too low can lookThe rule of thirds strange. Frame yourself in an interesting way. Follow the rule of thirds and position your head within the frame at roughly the intersection of the lines in the illustration. Allow some headroom and looking room so you don’t appear cramped. Adjust the tilt so that horizontal and vertical lines in the shot appear level.Find your focus. Be yourself. Only better.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 1Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 66. Lighting that Flatters Flatter your facial features by lighting yourself well. It’s best to start with a dark room and build a 3-point lighting plot from scratch.3-point lighting Point 1: The Key Light (brightest) should be positioned behind the camera, off to the side and at roughly a 45 degree angle above your head. Point 2: The Fill Light (second brightest) should be placed on the opposite side of the camera and used to fill in the shadows created by the Key. It too should be about 45 degrees above your head. Point 3: The Back Light (dimmest) should be placed behind and to one side. It provides dimension to the video by lighting your hair and shoulders. Diffuse the light to soften the shadows. Use diffusion materials purchased from a camera store or improvise using parchment paper or vellum. Everyone’s features are different, so start with the 3- point lighting scheme and make adjustments for your particular situation. Audio Capture Built-in microphones may not be good enough. If using an external microphone, place it a natural distance from you to capture the volume level suggested by the camera. It should not be in the shot nor create shadows. If the audio you capture has a thin quality or has faint echoes, do what you can to soften the hard surfaces in the room. Hang acoustic foam panels or draperies on the walls, and lay down carpeting.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 2Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 67. Setting Up Your Studio Consider the best location to meet your goals. Shooting in the learner’s natural habitat is often a good way to connect with them. • Should you be in an office or out in the field? • Would it be better to be in a branded or green screen studio? Decorate your set to work in harmony with your brand, try to keep things balanced and eliminate distractions. Avoid sets that look too sterile, staged or cluttered. Wardrobe, Hair & Keep your appearance appropriate for your Complexion organization, choose items that flatter and eliminate distractions. When choosing your wardrobe, opt for solids that contrast with each other and your surroundings. Avoid: • Loud patterns and stripes, which can cause video “noise.” • White, which can negatively affect the white balance setting on the camera. Pay attention to your hair. Keep it off your face, and get rid of fly-aways. The camera and lighting can make your complexion look unattractive. Improve your skin’s appearance by applying a light layer of skin-tone powder. Reapply often to tone down shine created by the lights. Editing When editing, keep things simple. Avoid the temptation to use fancy transitions and effects. They do little to advance the learning, and call too much attention to themselves. When shopping for editing software, look for the ability to: • Export and work with course-building software, SCORM and LMS • Import a variety of video & image formats • Run multiple video & audio tracks • Edit sound including noise reduction • Add text & titlesDown Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 3Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 68. Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 4Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 69. Engaging Learners On Camera Find your focus. The key to looking & sounding natural on video is to Be yourself. be engaged. This means you need to be in control of your Only better. thoughts, your movement and your speech. To do this, work hard to: • Find your focus: Pause to calm your racing mind and to think clearly. • Be yourself: Make sure the person captured on video looks, sounds and acts like the most professional and conversational version of the real you. • Only better: You may need to adapt to the complexities of video by slowing your speaking pace, moving less, smiling more, and so on. Identify Who You Are Address a single person with whom you have a Talking To friendly relationship. Doing this, rather than speaking to a faceless group of people, will make your video feel more personal. It will also positively affect your tone, enthusiasm and word choice. Make solid eye contact with the camera’s lens. Avoid looking to the side or beyond the camera; both will make you appear as if you’re disengaged or reading from a script.Find your focus. Be yourself. Only better.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 5Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 70. Be Clear, Concise, The first step to a successful video shoot is to start with an Conversational, Not excellent instructional design from which a script or Scripted detailed outline can be written. (see handout, page 7) Then, the key to sounding spontaneous and conversational is to wean yourself off of it by creating notes from which you can improvise. We recommend this process. Start with Excellent Instructional Design Write Script or Detailed Outline Gather Thoughts, Make Connections Create Notes as Cue Cards Review Out Loud Smile, Engage Your Friend, and… Action!Other Recommendations Do not use a teleprompter. Learn to sneak a peek. Be patient & ask it of others. Take breaks. Break it down into manageable clips. Understand what can be edited & what can’t. Do as many takes as it takes. Do not settle for just OK, but do not strive for perfection either.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 6Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 71. SAMPLE Excerpt from a Shooting ScriptClip Visual Content NotesClip 6 Video of Greg Once you’ve zeroed in on the one person you’re speaking to, you’re more likely to sound conversational and natural. However, if you’ve done your planning, you probably have a script or at least an outline that you’re working from. So, how do you follow your script, engage your friend AND sound conversational? The answer lies in not memorizing your script or using an ad hoc teleprompter. While these ideas may seem logical, they don’t work because: • Stiff • Unnatural • Reading Instead make notes for yourself and improvise around them. Now, I’m not recommending never writing out a script. The exercise of writing it out can really help you focus your thoughts, surface new ideas and logically string concepts together across multiple video clips. But once the camera is rolling you need to abandon the script, scribble notes, place them within eye sight, and improvise your way around them.Clip 7 Cut, fade back Here’s how I do it. Pull script into view to Greg • For me, no more than 2/3 page and refer to it. • Before camera rolls I look at my script Should I write on the Here’s my script for this shot you’re watching right now. I have it right here out of the shot so I can white board? Just hold reference it at any time. But before we turned on the camera, I jotted down some notes on a white board a marker? and placed it right there (point to white board placement). Before hitting record: • Review notes, get my head together • Engage the camera • Go Sometimes I can get through the entire clip without any trouble. Other times I need to sneak a peek. (Show example.) It should look like I’m looking into thin air and grabbing a thought. But it’s a learned skill, and I’m not always successful. Experiment and see what works for you.Clip 8 Fade through As I’ve said, the goal should be to sound conversational. This can be challenging if your script is too long. Use this fade as an black, back to Now, you may have noticed that we just faded through black in the edit. This is a technique you can use example of what to do Greg to cut your script into more manageable chunks, which will make you more likely to sound conversational to break a clip into and natural. manageable chunks.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 7Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 72. About your Presenter – Greg Owen-Boger Greg Owen-Boger is the Vice President of Turpin Communication, a presentation and facilitation skills training company based in Chicago. Schooled in management and the performing arts, Greg brings a diverse set of skills and experiences to the organization. He joined Turpin in 1995 as a camera man and quickly worked his way up. He now serves as a communication trainer and coach for Turpin’s largest clients. He also oversees all aspects of their E-Learning (www.onlinepresentationskillstraining.com) and blended learning (www.turpincommunication.com/ecoach.php) platforms including instructional design, script development, production and LMS deployment. He also appears on camera as a subject matter expert.Most recently Greg partnered with KinetiCast, a unique sales video/presentation tool, to provide theirusers with practical online how-to videos to help them shoot better on-the-fly video presentations.greg@turpincommunication.com773-256-9406www.linkedin.com/in/gregowenbogerFounded in 1992, Turpin Communication is a presentation and facilitation training company based inChicago.We take a personalized and comprehensive skill-building approach to our work. This means thatlearners always work on their own real-life content, and over the course of a 12-month blendedlearning program, concepts are introduced, practiced, refined and reinforced.Here are some guiding principles woven into the fabric of all we do.Business presentations are not the same things as speeches. Presentations should be thoughtof more as “orderly conversations.” Orderly because they should be carefully planned; conversationalbecause they need to have the lively quality of spontaneous dialogue.Everyone has what we call a “Default Approach” to presenting. Some default to the orderlyside of presenting, others to the conversational. Understanding one’s default – and makingappropriate adjustments to make up for the associated weaknesses – is key to a presenter’s success.Engaging listeners, that is calming the racing mind and connecting with the individuals in the room,is critical to every presenter’s ability to successfully manage all of their orderly conversations. Whenpresenters are engaged, their natural skills and personalities emerge. They are self-aware and able tomanage the complexities of presenting.Facilitating is an extension of presenting. No matter the purpose behind any facilitated event, thecontent needs to be organized and introduced appropriately. Doing so requires the same skills aspresenting. Therefore, facilitation sessions begin by developing those skills. TurpinCommunication.com OnlinePresentationSkillsTraining.com Facebook.com/TurpinCommunicationDown Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 8Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 73. Down & Dirty Video:Practical strategies for producing engaging E-Learning video on a budget Video Production Basics Video Production 1. Start with a well-planned instructional design Principles for with clear goals & learning objectives E-Learning 2. Consider your brand Then: • Identify video opportunities to support #1 • Shoot video consistent with #2 • Eliminate distractions for both Camera Type, Placement When choosing a camera, consider: Angle & Framing • Standard vs. high definition • Media storage and communication with editing software • Audio quality & capture method Place the camera a good distance from you and zoom in. Putting the camera too close can distort your facial features. Angle the camera so that it is at eye level, which is the most natural placement from the viewer’s perspective. Placing it too high or too low can lookThe rule of thirds strange. Frame yourself in an interesting way. Follow the rule of thirds and position your head within the frame at roughly the intersection of the lines in the illustration. Allow some headroom and looking room so you don’t appear cramped. Adjust the tilt so that horizontal and vertical lines in the shot appear level.Find your focus. Be yourself. Only better.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 1Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 74. Lighting that Flatters Flatter your facial features by lighting yourself well. It’s best to start with a dark room and build a 3-point lighting plot from scratch.3-point lighting Point 1: The Key Light (brightest) should be positioned behind the camera, off to the side and at roughly a 45 degree angle above your head. Point 2: The Fill Light (second brightest) should be placed on the opposite side of the camera and used to fill in the shadows created by the Key. It too should be about 45 degrees above your head. Point 3: The Back Light (dimmest) should be placed behind and to one side. It provides dimension to the video by lighting your hair and shoulders. Diffuse the light to soften the shadows. Use diffusion materials purchased from a camera store or improvise using parchment paper or vellum. Everyone’s features are different, so start with the 3- point lighting scheme and make adjustments for your particular situation. Audio Capture Built-in microphones may not be good enough. If using an external microphone, place it a natural distance from you to capture the volume level suggested by the camera. It should not be in the shot nor create shadows. If the audio you capture has a thin quality or has faint echoes, do what you can to soften the hard surfaces in the room. Hang acoustic foam panels or draperies on the walls, and lay down carpeting.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 2Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 75. Setting Up Your Studio Consider the best location to meet your goals. Shooting in the learner’s natural habitat is often a good way to connect with them. • Should you be in an office or out in the field? • Would it be better to be in a branded or green screen studio? Decorate your set to work in harmony with your brand, try to keep things balanced and eliminate distractions. Avoid sets that look too sterile, staged or cluttered. Wardrobe, Hair & Keep your appearance appropriate for your Complexion organization, choose items that flatter and eliminate distractions. When choosing your wardrobe, opt for solids that contrast with each other and your surroundings. Avoid: • Loud patterns and stripes, which can cause video “noise.” • White, which can negatively affect the white balance setting on the camera. Pay attention to your hair. Keep it off your face, and get rid of fly-aways. The camera and lighting can make your complexion look unattractive. Improve your skin’s appearance by applying a light layer of skin-tone powder. Reapply often to tone down shine created by the lights. Editing When editing, keep things simple. Avoid the temptation to use fancy transitions and effects. They do little to advance the learning, and call too much attention to themselves. When shopping for editing software, look for the ability to: • Export and work with course-building software, SCORM and LMS • Import a variety of video & image formats • Run multiple video & audio tracks • Edit sound including noise reduction • Add text & titlesDown Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 3Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 76. Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 4Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 77. Engaging Learners On Camera Find your focus. The key to looking & sounding natural on video is to Be yourself. be engaged. This means you need to be in control of your Only better. thoughts, your movement and your speech. To do this, work hard to: • Find your focus: Pause to calm your racing mind and to think clearly. • Be yourself: Make sure the person captured on video looks, sounds and acts like the most professional and conversational version of the real you. • Only better: You may need to adapt to the complexities of video by slowing your speaking pace, moving less, smiling more, and so on. Identify Who You Are Address a single person with whom you have a Talking To friendly relationship. Doing this, rather than speaking to a faceless group of people, will make your video feel more personal. It will also positively affect your tone, enthusiasm and word choice. Make solid eye contact with the camera’s lens. Avoid looking to the side or beyond the camera; both will make you appear as if you’re disengaged or reading from a script.Find your focus. Be yourself. Only better.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 5Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 78. Be Clear, Concise, The first step to a successful video shoot is to start with an Conversational, Not excellent instructional design from which a script or Scripted detailed outline can be written. (see handout, page 7) Then, the key to sounding spontaneous and conversational is to wean yourself off of it by creating notes from which you can improvise. We recommend this process. Start with Excellent Instructional Design Write Script or Detailed Outline Gather Thoughts, Make Connections Create Notes as Cue Cards Review Out Loud Smile, Engage Your Friend, and… Action!Other Recommendations Do not use a teleprompter. Learn to sneak a peek. Be patient & ask it of others. Take breaks. Break it down into manageable clips. Understand what can be edited & what can’t. Do as many takes as it takes. Do not settle for just OK, but do not strive for perfection either.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 6Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 79. SAMPLE Excerpt from a Shooting ScriptClip Visual Content NotesClip 6 Video of Greg Once you’ve zeroed in on the one person you’re speaking to, you’re more likely to sound conversational and natural. However, if you’ve done your planning, you probably have a script or at least an outline that you’re working from. So, how do you follow your script, engage your friend AND sound conversational? The answer lies in not memorizing your script or using an ad hoc teleprompter. While these ideas may seem logical, they don’t work because: • Stiff • Unnatural • Reading Instead make notes for yourself and improvise around them. Now, I’m not recommending never writing out a script. The exercise of writing it out can really help you focus your thoughts, surface new ideas and logically string concepts together across multiple video clips. But once the camera is rolling you need to abandon the script, scribble notes, place them within eye sight, and improvise your way around them.Clip 7 Cut, fade back Here’s how I do it. Pull script into view to Greg • For me, no more than 2/3 page and refer to it. • Before camera rolls I look at my script Should I write on the Here’s my script for this shot you’re watching right now. I have it right here out of the shot so I can white board? Just hold reference it at any time. But before we turned on the camera, I jotted down some notes on a white board a marker? and placed it right there (point to white board placement). Before hitting record: • Review notes, get my head together • Engage the camera • Go Sometimes I can get through the entire clip without any trouble. Other times I need to sneak a peek. (Show example.) It should look like I’m looking into thin air and grabbing a thought. But it’s a learned skill, and I’m not always successful. Experiment and see what works for you.Clip 8 Fade through As I’ve said, the goal should be to sound conversational. This can be challenging if your script is too long. Use this fade as an black, back to Now, you may have noticed that we just faded through black in the edit. This is a technique you can use example of what to do Greg to cut your script into more manageable chunks, which will make you more likely to sound conversational to break a clip into and natural. manageable chunks.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 7Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 80. About your Presenter – Greg Owen-Boger Greg Owen-Boger is the Vice President of Turpin Communication, a presentation and facilitation skills training company based in Chicago. Schooled in management and the performing arts, Greg brings a diverse set of skills and experiences to the organization. He joined Turpin in 1995 as a camera man and quickly worked his way up. He now serves as a communication trainer and coach for Turpin’s largest clients. He also oversees all aspects of their E-Learning (www.onlinepresentationskillstraining.com) and blended learning (www.turpincommunication.com/ecoach.php) platforms including instructional design, script development, production and LMS deployment. He also appears on camera as a subject matter expert.Most recently Greg partnered with KinetiCast, a unique sales video/presentation tool, to provide theirusers with practical online how-to videos to help them shoot better on-the-fly video presentations.greg@turpincommunication.com773-256-9406www.linkedin.com/in/gregowenbogerFounded in 1992, Turpin Communication is a presentation and facilitation training company based inChicago.We take a personalized and comprehensive skill-building approach to our work. This means thatlearners always work on their own real-life content, and over the course of a 12-month blendedlearning program, concepts are introduced, practiced, refined and reinforced.Here are some guiding principles woven into the fabric of all we do.Business presentations are not the same things as speeches. Presentations should be thoughtof more as “orderly conversations.” Orderly because they should be carefully planned; conversationalbecause they need to have the lively quality of spontaneous dialogue.Everyone has what we call a “Default Approach” to presenting. Some default to the orderlyside of presenting, others to the conversational. Understanding one’s default – and makingappropriate adjustments to make up for the associated weaknesses – is key to a presenter’s success.Engaging listeners, that is calming the racing mind and connecting with the individuals in the room,is critical to every presenter’s ability to successfully manage all of their orderly conversations. Whenpresenters are engaged, their natural skills and personalities emerge. They are self-aware and able tomanage the complexities of presenting.Facilitating is an extension of presenting. No matter the purpose behind any facilitated event, thecontent needs to be organized and introduced appropriately. Doing so requires the same skills aspresenting. Therefore, facilitation sessions begin by developing those skills. TurpinCommunication.com OnlinePresentationSkillsTraining.com Facebook.com/TurpinCommunicationDown Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 8Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 81. Down & Dirty Video:Practical strategies for producing engaging E-Learning video on a budget Video Production Basics Video Production 1. Start with a well-planned instructional design Principles for with clear goals & learning objectives E-Learning 2. Consider your brand Then: • Identify video opportunities to support #1 • Shoot video consistent with #2 • Eliminate distractions for both Camera Type, Placement When choosing a camera, consider: Angle & Framing • Standard vs. high definition • Media storage and communication with editing software • Audio quality & capture method Place the camera a good distance from you and zoom in. Putting the camera too close can distort your facial features. Angle the camera so that it is at eye level, which is the most natural placement from the viewer’s perspective. Placing it too high or too low can lookThe rule of thirds strange. Frame yourself in an interesting way. Follow the rule of thirds and position your head within the frame at roughly the intersection of the lines in the illustration. Allow some headroom and looking room so you don’t appear cramped. Adjust the tilt so that horizontal and vertical lines in the shot appear level.Find your focus. Be yourself. Only better.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 1Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 82. Lighting that Flatters Flatter your facial features by lighting yourself well. It’s best to start with a dark room and build a 3-point lighting plot from scratch.3-point lighting Point 1: The Key Light (brightest) should be positioned behind the camera, off to the side and at roughly a 45 degree angle above your head. Point 2: The Fill Light (second brightest) should be placed on the opposite side of the camera and used to fill in the shadows created by the Key. It too should be about 45 degrees above your head. Point 3: The Back Light (dimmest) should be placed behind and to one side. It provides dimension to the video by lighting your hair and shoulders. Diffuse the light to soften the shadows. Use diffusion materials purchased from a camera store or improvise using parchment paper or vellum. Everyone’s features are different, so start with the 3- point lighting scheme and make adjustments for your particular situation. Audio Capture Built-in microphones may not be good enough. If using an external microphone, place it a natural distance from you to capture the volume level suggested by the camera. It should not be in the shot nor create shadows. If the audio you capture has a thin quality or has faint echoes, do what you can to soften the hard surfaces in the room. Hang acoustic foam panels or draperies on the walls, and lay down carpeting.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 2Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 83. Setting Up Your Studio Consider the best location to meet your goals. Shooting in the learner’s natural habitat is often a good way to connect with them. • Should you be in an office or out in the field? • Would it be better to be in a branded or green screen studio? Decorate your set to work in harmony with your brand, try to keep things balanced and eliminate distractions. Avoid sets that look too sterile, staged or cluttered. Wardrobe, Hair & Keep your appearance appropriate for your Complexion organization, choose items that flatter and eliminate distractions. When choosing your wardrobe, opt for solids that contrast with each other and your surroundings. Avoid: • Loud patterns and stripes, which can cause video “noise.” • White, which can negatively affect the white balance setting on the camera. Pay attention to your hair. Keep it off your face, and get rid of fly-aways. The camera and lighting can make your complexion look unattractive. Improve your skin’s appearance by applying a light layer of skin-tone powder. Reapply often to tone down shine created by the lights. Editing When editing, keep things simple. Avoid the temptation to use fancy transitions and effects. They do little to advance the learning, and call too much attention to themselves. When shopping for editing software, look for the ability to: • Export and work with course-building software, SCORM and LMS • Import a variety of video & image formats • Run multiple video & audio tracks • Edit sound including noise reduction • Add text & titlesDown Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 3Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 84. Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 4Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 85. Engaging Learners On Camera Find your focus. The key to looking & sounding natural on video is to Be yourself. be engaged. This means you need to be in control of your Only better. thoughts, your movement and your speech. To do this, work hard to: • Find your focus: Pause to calm your racing mind and to think clearly. • Be yourself: Make sure the person captured on video looks, sounds and acts like the most professional and conversational version of the real you. • Only better: You may need to adapt to the complexities of video by slowing your speaking pace, moving less, smiling more, and so on. Identify Who You Are Address a single person with whom you have a Talking To friendly relationship. Doing this, rather than speaking to a faceless group of people, will make your video feel more personal. It will also positively affect your tone, enthusiasm and word choice. Make solid eye contact with the camera’s lens. Avoid looking to the side or beyond the camera; both will make you appear as if you’re disengaged or reading from a script.Find your focus. Be yourself. Only better.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 5Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 86. Be Clear, Concise, The first step to a successful video shoot is to start with an Conversational, Not excellent instructional design from which a script or Scripted detailed outline can be written. (see handout, page 7) Then, the key to sounding spontaneous and conversational is to wean yourself off of it by creating notes from which you can improvise. We recommend this process. Start with Excellent Instructional Design Write Script or Detailed Outline Gather Thoughts, Make Connections Create Notes as Cue Cards Review Out Loud Smile, Engage Your Friend, and… Action!Other Recommendations Do not use a teleprompter. Learn to sneak a peek. Be patient & ask it of others. Take breaks. Break it down into manageable clips. Understand what can be edited & what can’t. Do as many takes as it takes. Do not settle for just OK, but do not strive for perfection either.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 6Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 87. SAMPLE Excerpt from a Shooting ScriptClip Visual Content NotesClip 6 Video of Greg Once you’ve zeroed in on the one person you’re speaking to, you’re more likely to sound conversational and natural. However, if you’ve done your planning, you probably have a script or at least an outline that you’re working from. So, how do you follow your script, engage your friend AND sound conversational? The answer lies in not memorizing your script or using an ad hoc teleprompter. While these ideas may seem logical, they don’t work because: • Stiff • Unnatural • Reading Instead make notes for yourself and improvise around them. Now, I’m not recommending never writing out a script. The exercise of writing it out can really help you focus your thoughts, surface new ideas and logically string concepts together across multiple video clips. But once the camera is rolling you need to abandon the script, scribble notes, place them within eye sight, and improvise your way around them.Clip 7 Cut, fade back Here’s how I do it. Pull script into view to Greg • For me, no more than 2/3 page and refer to it. • Before camera rolls I look at my script Should I write on the Here’s my script for this shot you’re watching right now. I have it right here out of the shot so I can white board? Just hold reference it at any time. But before we turned on the camera, I jotted down some notes on a white board a marker? and placed it right there (point to white board placement). Before hitting record: • Review notes, get my head together • Engage the camera • Go Sometimes I can get through the entire clip without any trouble. Other times I need to sneak a peek. (Show example.) It should look like I’m looking into thin air and grabbing a thought. But it’s a learned skill, and I’m not always successful. Experiment and see what works for you.Clip 8 Fade through As I’ve said, the goal should be to sound conversational. This can be challenging if your script is too long. Use this fade as an black, back to Now, you may have noticed that we just faded through black in the edit. This is a technique you can use example of what to do Greg to cut your script into more manageable chunks, which will make you more likely to sound conversational to break a clip into and natural. manageable chunks.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 7Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 88. About your Presenter – Greg Owen-Boger Greg Owen-Boger is the Vice President of Turpin Communication, a presentation and facilitation skills training company based in Chicago. Schooled in management and the performing arts, Greg brings a diverse set of skills and experiences to the organization. He joined Turpin in 1995 as a camera man and quickly worked his way up. He now serves as a communication trainer and coach for Turpin’s largest clients. He also oversees all aspects of their E-Learning (www.onlinepresentationskillstraining.com) and blended learning (www.turpincommunication.com/ecoach.php) platforms including instructional design, script development, production and LMS deployment. He also appears on camera as a subject matter expert.Most recently Greg partnered with KinetiCast, a unique sales video/presentation tool, to provide theirusers with practical online how-to videos to help them shoot better on-the-fly video presentations.greg@turpincommunication.com773-256-9406www.linkedin.com/in/gregowenbogerFounded in 1992, Turpin Communication is a presentation and facilitation training company based inChicago.We take a personalized and comprehensive skill-building approach to our work. This means thatlearners always work on their own real-life content, and over the course of a 12-month blendedlearning program, concepts are introduced, practiced, refined and reinforced.Here are some guiding principles woven into the fabric of all we do.Business presentations are not the same things as speeches. Presentations should be thoughtof more as “orderly conversations.” Orderly because they should be carefully planned; conversationalbecause they need to have the lively quality of spontaneous dialogue.Everyone has what we call a “Default Approach” to presenting. Some default to the orderlyside of presenting, others to the conversational. Understanding one’s default – and makingappropriate adjustments to make up for the associated weaknesses – is key to a presenter’s success.Engaging listeners, that is calming the racing mind and connecting with the individuals in the room,is critical to every presenter’s ability to successfully manage all of their orderly conversations. Whenpresenters are engaged, their natural skills and personalities emerge. They are self-aware and able tomanage the complexities of presenting.Facilitating is an extension of presenting. No matter the purpose behind any facilitated event, thecontent needs to be organized and introduced appropriately. Doing so requires the same skills aspresenting. Therefore, facilitation sessions begin by developing those skills. TurpinCommunication.com OnlinePresentationSkillsTraining.com Facebook.com/TurpinCommunicationDown Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 8Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 89. Down & Dirty Video:Practical strategies for producing engaging E-Learning video on a budget Video Production Basics Video Production 1. Start with a well-planned instructional design Principles for with clear goals & learning objectives E-Learning 2. Consider your brand Then: • Identify video opportunities to support #1 • Shoot video consistent with #2 • Eliminate distractions for both Camera Type, Placement When choosing a camera, consider: Angle & Framing • Standard vs. high definition • Media storage and communication with editing software • Audio quality & capture method Place the camera a good distance from you and zoom in. Putting the camera too close can distort your facial features. Angle the camera so that it is at eye level, which is the most natural placement from the viewer’s perspective. Placing it too high or too low can lookThe rule of thirds strange. Frame yourself in an interesting way. Follow the rule of thirds and position your head within the frame at roughly the intersection of the lines in the illustration. Allow some headroom and looking room so you don’t appear cramped. Adjust the tilt so that horizontal and vertical lines in the shot appear level.Find your focus. Be yourself. Only better.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 1Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 90. Lighting that Flatters Flatter your facial features by lighting yourself well. It’s best to start with a dark room and build a 3-point lighting plot from scratch.3-point lighting Point 1: The Key Light (brightest) should be positioned behind the camera, off to the side and at roughly a 45 degree angle above your head. Point 2: The Fill Light (second brightest) should be placed on the opposite side of the camera and used to fill in the shadows created by the Key. It too should be about 45 degrees above your head. Point 3: The Back Light (dimmest) should be placed behind and to one side. It provides dimension to the video by lighting your hair and shoulders. Diffuse the light to soften the shadows. Use diffusion materials purchased from a camera store or improvise using parchment paper or vellum. Everyone’s features are different, so start with the 3- point lighting scheme and make adjustments for your particular situation. Audio Capture Built-in microphones may not be good enough. If using an external microphone, place it a natural distance from you to capture the volume level suggested by the camera. It should not be in the shot nor create shadows. If the audio you capture has a thin quality or has faint echoes, do what you can to soften the hard surfaces in the room. Hang acoustic foam panels or draperies on the walls, and lay down carpeting.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 2Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 91. Setting Up Your Studio Consider the best location to meet your goals. Shooting in the learner’s natural habitat is often a good way to connect with them. • Should you be in an office or out in the field? • Would it be better to be in a branded or green screen studio? Decorate your set to work in harmony with your brand, try to keep things balanced and eliminate distractions. Avoid sets that look too sterile, staged or cluttered. Wardrobe, Hair & Keep your appearance appropriate for your Complexion organization, choose items that flatter and eliminate distractions. When choosing your wardrobe, opt for solids that contrast with each other and your surroundings. Avoid: • Loud patterns and stripes, which can cause video “noise.” • White, which can negatively affect the white balance setting on the camera. Pay attention to your hair. Keep it off your face, and get rid of fly-aways. The camera and lighting can make your complexion look unattractive. Improve your skin’s appearance by applying a light layer of skin-tone powder. Reapply often to tone down shine created by the lights. Editing When editing, keep things simple. Avoid the temptation to use fancy transitions and effects. They do little to advance the learning, and call too much attention to themselves. When shopping for editing software, look for the ability to: • Export and work with course-building software, SCORM and LMS • Import a variety of video & image formats • Run multiple video & audio tracks • Edit sound including noise reduction • Add text & titlesDown Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 3Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 92. Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 4Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 93. Engaging Learners On Camera Find your focus. The key to looking & sounding natural on video is to Be yourself. be engaged. This means you need to be in control of your Only better. thoughts, your movement and your speech. To do this, work hard to: • Find your focus: Pause to calm your racing mind and to think clearly. • Be yourself: Make sure the person captured on video looks, sounds and acts like the most professional and conversational version of the real you. • Only better: You may need to adapt to the complexities of video by slowing your speaking pace, moving less, smiling more, and so on. Identify Who You Are Address a single person with whom you have a Talking To friendly relationship. Doing this, rather than speaking to a faceless group of people, will make your video feel more personal. It will also positively affect your tone, enthusiasm and word choice. Make solid eye contact with the camera’s lens. Avoid looking to the side or beyond the camera; both will make you appear as if you’re disengaged or reading from a script.Find your focus. Be yourself. Only better.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 5Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 94. Be Clear, Concise, The first step to a successful video shoot is to start with an Conversational, Not excellent instructional design from which a script or Scripted detailed outline can be written. (see handout, page 7) Then, the key to sounding spontaneous and conversational is to wean yourself off of it by creating notes from which you can improvise. We recommend this process. Start with Excellent Instructional Design Write Script or Detailed Outline Gather Thoughts, Make Connections Create Notes as Cue Cards Review Out Loud Smile, Engage Your Friend, and… Action!Other Recommendations Do not use a teleprompter. Learn to sneak a peek. Be patient & ask it of others. Take breaks. Break it down into manageable clips. Understand what can be edited & what can’t. Do as many takes as it takes. Do not settle for just OK, but do not strive for perfection either.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 6Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 95. SAMPLE Excerpt from a Shooting ScriptClip Visual Content NotesClip 6 Video of Greg Once you’ve zeroed in on the one person you’re speaking to, you’re more likely to sound conversational and natural. However, if you’ve done your planning, you probably have a script or at least an outline that you’re working from. So, how do you follow your script, engage your friend AND sound conversational? The answer lies in not memorizing your script or using an ad hoc teleprompter. While these ideas may seem logical, they don’t work because: • Stiff • Unnatural • Reading Instead make notes for yourself and improvise around them. Now, I’m not recommending never writing out a script. The exercise of writing it out can really help you focus your thoughts, surface new ideas and logically string concepts together across multiple video clips. But once the camera is rolling you need to abandon the script, scribble notes, place them within eye sight, and improvise your way around them.Clip 7 Cut, fade back Here’s how I do it. Pull script into view to Greg • For me, no more than 2/3 page and refer to it. • Before camera rolls I look at my script Should I write on the Here’s my script for this shot you’re watching right now. I have it right here out of the shot so I can white board? Just hold reference it at any time. But before we turned on the camera, I jotted down some notes on a white board a marker? and placed it right there (point to white board placement). Before hitting record: • Review notes, get my head together • Engage the camera • Go Sometimes I can get through the entire clip without any trouble. Other times I need to sneak a peek. (Show example.) It should look like I’m looking into thin air and grabbing a thought. But it’s a learned skill, and I’m not always successful. Experiment and see what works for you.Clip 8 Fade through As I’ve said, the goal should be to sound conversational. This can be challenging if your script is too long. Use this fade as an black, back to Now, you may have noticed that we just faded through black in the edit. This is a technique you can use example of what to do Greg to cut your script into more manageable chunks, which will make you more likely to sound conversational to break a clip into and natural. manageable chunks.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 7Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 96. About your Presenter – Greg Owen-Boger Greg Owen-Boger is the Vice President of Turpin Communication, a presentation and facilitation skills training company based in Chicago. Schooled in management and the performing arts, Greg brings a diverse set of skills and experiences to the organization. He joined Turpin in 1995 as a camera man and quickly worked his way up. He now serves as a communication trainer and coach for Turpin’s largest clients. He also oversees all aspects of their E-Learning (www.onlinepresentationskillstraining.com) and blended learning (www.turpincommunication.com/ecoach.php) platforms including instructional design, script development, production and LMS deployment. He also appears on camera as a subject matter expert.Most recently Greg partnered with KinetiCast, a unique sales video/presentation tool, to provide theirusers with practical online how-to videos to help them shoot better on-the-fly video presentations.greg@turpincommunication.com773-256-9406www.linkedin.com/in/gregowenbogerFounded in 1992, Turpin Communication is a presentation and facilitation training company based inChicago.We take a personalized and comprehensive skill-building approach to our work. This means thatlearners always work on their own real-life content, and over the course of a 12-month blendedlearning program, concepts are introduced, practiced, refined and reinforced.Here are some guiding principles woven into the fabric of all we do.Business presentations are not the same things as speeches. Presentations should be thoughtof more as “orderly conversations.” Orderly because they should be carefully planned; conversationalbecause they need to have the lively quality of spontaneous dialogue.Everyone has what we call a “Default Approach” to presenting. Some default to the orderlyside of presenting, others to the conversational. Understanding one’s default – and makingappropriate adjustments to make up for the associated weaknesses – is key to a presenter’s success.Engaging listeners, that is calming the racing mind and connecting with the individuals in the room,is critical to every presenter’s ability to successfully manage all of their orderly conversations. Whenpresenters are engaged, their natural skills and personalities emerge. They are self-aware and able tomanage the complexities of presenting.Facilitating is an extension of presenting. No matter the purpose behind any facilitated event, thecontent needs to be organized and introduced appropriately. Doing so requires the same skills aspresenting. Therefore, facilitation sessions begin by developing those skills. TurpinCommunication.com OnlinePresentationSkillsTraining.com Facebook.com/TurpinCommunicationDown Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 8Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 97. Down & Dirty Video:Practical strategies for producing engaging E-Learning video on a budget Video Production Basics Video Production 1. Start with a well-planned instructional design Principles for with clear goals & learning objectives E-Learning 2. Consider your brand Then: • Identify video opportunities to support #1 • Shoot video consistent with #2 • Eliminate distractions for both Camera Type, Placement When choosing a camera, consider: Angle & Framing • Standard vs. high definition • Media storage and communication with editing software • Audio quality & capture method Place the camera a good distance from you and zoom in. Putting the camera too close can distort your facial features. Angle the camera so that it is at eye level, which is the most natural placement from the viewer’s perspective. Placing it too high or too low can lookThe rule of thirds strange. Frame yourself in an interesting way. Follow the rule of thirds and position your head within the frame at roughly the intersection of the lines in the illustration. Allow some headroom and looking room so you don’t appear cramped. Adjust the tilt so that horizontal and vertical lines in the shot appear level.Find your focus. Be yourself. Only better.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 1Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 98. Lighting that Flatters Flatter your facial features by lighting yourself well. It’s best to start with a dark room and build a 3-point lighting plot from scratch.3-point lighting Point 1: The Key Light (brightest) should be positioned behind the camera, off to the side and at roughly a 45 degree angle above your head. Point 2: The Fill Light (second brightest) should be placed on the opposite side of the camera and used to fill in the shadows created by the Key. It too should be about 45 degrees above your head. Point 3: The Back Light (dimmest) should be placed behind and to one side. It provides dimension to the video by lighting your hair and shoulders. Diffuse the light to soften the shadows. Use diffusion materials purchased from a camera store or improvise using parchment paper or vellum. Everyone’s features are different, so start with the 3- point lighting scheme and make adjustments for your particular situation. Audio Capture Built-in microphones may not be good enough. If using an external microphone, place it a natural distance from you to capture the volume level suggested by the camera. It should not be in the shot nor create shadows. If the audio you capture has a thin quality or has faint echoes, do what you can to soften the hard surfaces in the room. Hang acoustic foam panels or draperies on the walls, and lay down carpeting.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 2Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 99. Setting Up Your Studio Consider the best location to meet your goals. Shooting in the learner’s natural habitat is often a good way to connect with them. • Should you be in an office or out in the field? • Would it be better to be in a branded or green screen studio? Decorate your set to work in harmony with your brand, try to keep things balanced and eliminate distractions. Avoid sets that look too sterile, staged or cluttered. Wardrobe, Hair & Keep your appearance appropriate for your Complexion organization, choose items that flatter and eliminate distractions. When choosing your wardrobe, opt for solids that contrast with each other and your surroundings. Avoid: • Loud patterns and stripes, which can cause video “noise.” • White, which can negatively affect the white balance setting on the camera. Pay attention to your hair. Keep it off your face, and get rid of fly-aways. The camera and lighting can make your complexion look unattractive. Improve your skin’s appearance by applying a light layer of skin-tone powder. Reapply often to tone down shine created by the lights. Editing When editing, keep things simple. Avoid the temptation to use fancy transitions and effects. They do little to advance the learning, and call too much attention to themselves. When shopping for editing software, look for the ability to: • Export and work with course-building software, SCORM and LMS • Import a variety of video & image formats • Run multiple video & audio tracks • Edit sound including noise reduction • Add text & titlesDown Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 3Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 100. Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 4Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 101. Engaging Learners On Camera Find your focus. The key to looking & sounding natural on video is to Be yourself. be engaged. This means you need to be in control of your Only better. thoughts, your movement and your speech. To do this, work hard to: • Find your focus: Pause to calm your racing mind and to think clearly. • Be yourself: Make sure the person captured on video looks, sounds and acts like the most professional and conversational version of the real you. • Only better: You may need to adapt to the complexities of video by slowing your speaking pace, moving less, smiling more, and so on. Identify Who You Are Address a single person with whom you have a Talking To friendly relationship. Doing this, rather than speaking to a faceless group of people, will make your video feel more personal. It will also positively affect your tone, enthusiasm and word choice. Make solid eye contact with the camera’s lens. Avoid looking to the side or beyond the camera; both will make you appear as if you’re disengaged or reading from a script.Find your focus. Be yourself. Only better.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 5Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 102. Be Clear, Concise, The first step to a successful video shoot is to start with an Conversational, Not excellent instructional design from which a script or Scripted detailed outline can be written. (see handout, page 7) Then, the key to sounding spontaneous and conversational is to wean yourself off of it by creating notes from which you can improvise. We recommend this process. Start with Excellent Instructional Design Write Script or Detailed Outline Gather Thoughts, Make Connections Create Notes as Cue Cards Review Out Loud Smile, Engage Your Friend, and… Action!Other Recommendations Do not use a teleprompter. Learn to sneak a peek. Be patient & ask it of others. Take breaks. Break it down into manageable clips. Understand what can be edited & what can’t. Do as many takes as it takes. Do not settle for just OK, but do not strive for perfection either.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 6Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 103. SAMPLE Excerpt from a Shooting ScriptClip Visual Content NotesClip 6 Video of Greg Once you’ve zeroed in on the one person you’re speaking to, you’re more likely to sound conversational and natural. However, if you’ve done your planning, you probably have a script or at least an outline that you’re working from. So, how do you follow your script, engage your friend AND sound conversational? The answer lies in not memorizing your script or using an ad hoc teleprompter. While these ideas may seem logical, they don’t work because: • Stiff • Unnatural • Reading Instead make notes for yourself and improvise around them. Now, I’m not recommending never writing out a script. The exercise of writing it out can really help you focus your thoughts, surface new ideas and logically string concepts together across multiple video clips. But once the camera is rolling you need to abandon the script, scribble notes, place them within eye sight, and improvise your way around them.Clip 7 Cut, fade back Here’s how I do it. Pull script into view to Greg • For me, no more than 2/3 page and refer to it. • Before camera rolls I look at my script Should I write on the Here’s my script for this shot you’re watching right now. I have it right here out of the shot so I can white board? Just hold reference it at any time. But before we turned on the camera, I jotted down some notes on a white board a marker? and placed it right there (point to white board placement). Before hitting record: • Review notes, get my head together • Engage the camera • Go Sometimes I can get through the entire clip without any trouble. Other times I need to sneak a peek. (Show example.) It should look like I’m looking into thin air and grabbing a thought. But it’s a learned skill, and I’m not always successful. Experiment and see what works for you.Clip 8 Fade through As I’ve said, the goal should be to sound conversational. This can be challenging if your script is too long. Use this fade as an black, back to Now, you may have noticed that we just faded through black in the edit. This is a technique you can use example of what to do Greg to cut your script into more manageable chunks, which will make you more likely to sound conversational to break a clip into and natural. manageable chunks.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 7Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 104. About your Presenter – Greg Owen-Boger Greg Owen-Boger is the Vice President of Turpin Communication, a presentation and facilitation skills training company based in Chicago. Schooled in management and the performing arts, Greg brings a diverse set of skills and experiences to the organization. He joined Turpin in 1995 as a camera man and quickly worked his way up. He now serves as a communication trainer and coach for Turpin’s largest clients. He also oversees all aspects of their E-Learning (www.onlinepresentationskillstraining.com) and blended learning (www.turpincommunication.com/ecoach.php) platforms including instructional design, script development, production and LMS deployment. He also appears on camera as a subject matter expert.Most recently Greg partnered with KinetiCast, a unique sales video/presentation tool, to provide theirusers with practical online how-to videos to help them shoot better on-the-fly video presentations.greg@turpincommunication.com773-256-9406www.linkedin.com/in/gregowenbogerFounded in 1992, Turpin Communication is a presentation and facilitation training company based inChicago.We take a personalized and comprehensive skill-building approach to our work. This means thatlearners always work on their own real-life content, and over the course of a 12-month blendedlearning program, concepts are introduced, practiced, refined and reinforced.Here are some guiding principles woven into the fabric of all we do.Business presentations are not the same things as speeches. Presentations should be thoughtof more as “orderly conversations.” Orderly because they should be carefully planned; conversationalbecause they need to have the lively quality of spontaneous dialogue.Everyone has what we call a “Default Approach” to presenting. Some default to the orderlyside of presenting, others to the conversational. Understanding one’s default – and makingappropriate adjustments to make up for the associated weaknesses – is key to a presenter’s success.Engaging listeners, that is calming the racing mind and connecting with the individuals in the room,is critical to every presenter’s ability to successfully manage all of their orderly conversations. Whenpresenters are engaged, their natural skills and personalities emerge. They are self-aware and able tomanage the complexities of presenting.Facilitating is an extension of presenting. No matter the purpose behind any facilitated event, thecontent needs to be organized and introduced appropriately. Doing so requires the same skills aspresenting. Therefore, facilitation sessions begin by developing those skills. TurpinCommunication.com OnlinePresentationSkillsTraining.com Facebook.com/TurpinCommunicationDown Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 8Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 105. Down & Dirty Video:Practical strategies for producing engaging E-Learning video on a budget Video Production Basics Video Production 1. Start with a well-planned instructional design Principles for with clear goals & learning objectives E-Learning 2. Consider your brand Then: • Identify video opportunities to support #1 • Shoot video consistent with #2 • Eliminate distractions for both Camera Type, Placement When choosing a camera, consider: Angle & Framing • Standard vs. high definition • Media storage and communication with editing software • Audio quality & capture method Place the camera a good distance from you and zoom in. Putting the camera too close can distort your facial features. Angle the camera so that it is at eye level, which is the most natural placement from the viewer’s perspective. Placing it too high or too low can lookThe rule of thirds strange. Frame yourself in an interesting way. Follow the rule of thirds and position your head within the frame at roughly the intersection of the lines in the illustration. Allow some headroom and looking room so you don’t appear cramped. Adjust the tilt so that horizontal and vertical lines in the shot appear level.Find your focus. Be yourself. Only better.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 1Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 106. Lighting that Flatters Flatter your facial features by lighting yourself well. It’s best to start with a dark room and build a 3-point lighting plot from scratch.3-point lighting Point 1: The Key Light (brightest) should be positioned behind the camera, off to the side and at roughly a 45 degree angle above your head. Point 2: The Fill Light (second brightest) should be placed on the opposite side of the camera and used to fill in the shadows created by the Key. It too should be about 45 degrees above your head. Point 3: The Back Light (dimmest) should be placed behind and to one side. It provides dimension to the video by lighting your hair and shoulders. Diffuse the light to soften the shadows. Use diffusion materials purchased from a camera store or improvise using parchment paper or vellum. Everyone’s features are different, so start with the 3- point lighting scheme and make adjustments for your particular situation. Audio Capture Built-in microphones may not be good enough. If using an external microphone, place it a natural distance from you to capture the volume level suggested by the camera. It should not be in the shot nor create shadows. If the audio you capture has a thin quality or has faint echoes, do what you can to soften the hard surfaces in the room. Hang acoustic foam panels or draperies on the walls, and lay down carpeting.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 2Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 107. Setting Up Your Studio Consider the best location to meet your goals. Shooting in the learner’s natural habitat is often a good way to connect with them. • Should you be in an office or out in the field? • Would it be better to be in a branded or green screen studio? Decorate your set to work in harmony with your brand, try to keep things balanced and eliminate distractions. Avoid sets that look too sterile, staged or cluttered. Wardrobe, Hair & Keep your appearance appropriate for your Complexion organization, choose items that flatter and eliminate distractions. When choosing your wardrobe, opt for solids that contrast with each other and your surroundings. Avoid: • Loud patterns and stripes, which can cause video “noise.” • White, which can negatively affect the white balance setting on the camera. Pay attention to your hair. Keep it off your face, and get rid of fly-aways. The camera and lighting can make your complexion look unattractive. Improve your skin’s appearance by applying a light layer of skin-tone powder. Reapply often to tone down shine created by the lights. Editing When editing, keep things simple. Avoid the temptation to use fancy transitions and effects. They do little to advance the learning, and call too much attention to themselves. When shopping for editing software, look for the ability to: • Export and work with course-building software, SCORM and LMS • Import a variety of video & image formats • Run multiple video & audio tracks • Edit sound including noise reduction • Add text & titlesDown Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 3Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 108. Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 4Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 109. Engaging Learners On Camera Find your focus. The key to looking & sounding natural on video is to Be yourself. be engaged. This means you need to be in control of your Only better. thoughts, your movement and your speech. To do this, work hard to: • Find your focus: Pause to calm your racing mind and to think clearly. • Be yourself: Make sure the person captured on video looks, sounds and acts like the most professional and conversational version of the real you. • Only better: You may need to adapt to the complexities of video by slowing your speaking pace, moving less, smiling more, and so on. Identify Who You Are Address a single person with whom you have a Talking To friendly relationship. Doing this, rather than speaking to a faceless group of people, will make your video feel more personal. It will also positively affect your tone, enthusiasm and word choice. Make solid eye contact with the camera’s lens. Avoid looking to the side or beyond the camera; both will make you appear as if you’re disengaged or reading from a script.Find your focus. Be yourself. Only better.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 5Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 110. Be Clear, Concise, The first step to a successful video shoot is to start with an Conversational, Not excellent instructional design from which a script or Scripted detailed outline can be written. (see handout, page 7) Then, the key to sounding spontaneous and conversational is to wean yourself off of it by creating notes from which you can improvise. We recommend this process. Start with Excellent Instructional Design Write Script or Detailed Outline Gather Thoughts, Make Connections Create Notes as Cue Cards Review Out Loud Smile, Engage Your Friend, and… Action!Other Recommendations Do not use a teleprompter. Learn to sneak a peek. Be patient & ask it of others. Take breaks. Break it down into manageable clips. Understand what can be edited & what can’t. Do as many takes as it takes. Do not settle for just OK, but do not strive for perfection either.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 6Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 111. SAMPLE Excerpt from a Shooting ScriptClip Visual Content NotesClip 6 Video of Greg Once you’ve zeroed in on the one person you’re speaking to, you’re more likely to sound conversational and natural. However, if you’ve done your planning, you probably have a script or at least an outline that you’re working from. So, how do you follow your script, engage your friend AND sound conversational? The answer lies in not memorizing your script or using an ad hoc teleprompter. While these ideas may seem logical, they don’t work because: • Stiff • Unnatural • Reading Instead make notes for yourself and improvise around them. Now, I’m not recommending never writing out a script. The exercise of writing it out can really help you focus your thoughts, surface new ideas and logically string concepts together across multiple video clips. But once the camera is rolling you need to abandon the script, scribble notes, place them within eye sight, and improvise your way around them.Clip 7 Cut, fade back Here’s how I do it. Pull script into view to Greg • For me, no more than 2/3 page and refer to it. • Before camera rolls I look at my script Should I write on the Here’s my script for this shot you’re watching right now. I have it right here out of the shot so I can white board? Just hold reference it at any time. But before we turned on the camera, I jotted down some notes on a white board a marker? and placed it right there (point to white board placement). Before hitting record: • Review notes, get my head together • Engage the camera • Go Sometimes I can get through the entire clip without any trouble. Other times I need to sneak a peek. (Show example.) It should look like I’m looking into thin air and grabbing a thought. But it’s a learned skill, and I’m not always successful. Experiment and see what works for you.Clip 8 Fade through As I’ve said, the goal should be to sound conversational. This can be challenging if your script is too long. Use this fade as an black, back to Now, you may have noticed that we just faded through black in the edit. This is a technique you can use example of what to do Greg to cut your script into more manageable chunks, which will make you more likely to sound conversational to break a clip into and natural. manageable chunks.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 7Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 112. About your Presenter – Greg Owen-Boger Greg Owen-Boger is the Vice President of Turpin Communication, a presentation and facilitation skills training company based in Chicago. Schooled in management and the performing arts, Greg brings a diverse set of skills and experiences to the organization. He joined Turpin in 1995 as a camera man and quickly worked his way up. He now serves as a communication trainer and coach for Turpin’s largest clients. He also oversees all aspects of their E-Learning (www.onlinepresentationskillstraining.com) and blended learning (www.turpincommunication.com/ecoach.php) platforms including instructional design, script development, production and LMS deployment. He also appears on camera as a subject matter expert.Most recently Greg partnered with KinetiCast, a unique sales video/presentation tool, to provide theirusers with practical online how-to videos to help them shoot better on-the-fly video presentations.greg@turpincommunication.com773-256-9406www.linkedin.com/in/gregowenbogerFounded in 1992, Turpin Communication is a presentation and facilitation training company based inChicago.We take a personalized and comprehensive skill-building approach to our work. This means thatlearners always work on their own real-life content, and over the course of a 12-month blendedlearning program, concepts are introduced, practiced, refined and reinforced.Here are some guiding principles woven into the fabric of all we do.Business presentations are not the same things as speeches. Presentations should be thoughtof more as “orderly conversations.” Orderly because they should be carefully planned; conversationalbecause they need to have the lively quality of spontaneous dialogue.Everyone has what we call a “Default Approach” to presenting. Some default to the orderlyside of presenting, others to the conversational. Understanding one’s default – and makingappropriate adjustments to make up for the associated weaknesses – is key to a presenter’s success.Engaging listeners, that is calming the racing mind and connecting with the individuals in the room,is critical to every presenter’s ability to successfully manage all of their orderly conversations. Whenpresenters are engaged, their natural skills and personalities emerge. They are self-aware and able tomanage the complexities of presenting.Facilitating is an extension of presenting. No matter the purpose behind any facilitated event, thecontent needs to be organized and introduced appropriately. Doing so requires the same skills aspresenting. Therefore, facilitation sessions begin by developing those skills. TurpinCommunication.com OnlinePresentationSkillsTraining.com Facebook.com/TurpinCommunicationDown Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 8Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 113. Down & Dirty Video:Practical strategies for producing engaging E-Learning video on a budget Video Production Basics Video Production 1. Start with a well-planned instructional design Principles for with clear goals & learning objectives E-Learning 2. Consider your brand Then: • Identify video opportunities to support #1 • Shoot video consistent with #2 • Eliminate distractions for both Camera Type, Placement When choosing a camera, consider: Angle & Framing • Standard vs. high definition • Media storage and communication with editing software • Audio quality & capture method Place the camera a good distance from you and zoom in. Putting the camera too close can distort your facial features. Angle the camera so that it is at eye level, which is the most natural placement from the viewer’s perspective. Placing it too high or too low can lookThe rule of thirds strange. Frame yourself in an interesting way. Follow the rule of thirds and position your head within the frame at roughly the intersection of the lines in the illustration. Allow some headroom and looking room so you don’t appear cramped. Adjust the tilt so that horizontal and vertical lines in the shot appear level.Find your focus. Be yourself. Only better.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 1Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 114. Lighting that Flatters Flatter your facial features by lighting yourself well. It’s best to start with a dark room and build a 3-point lighting plot from scratch.3-point lighting Point 1: The Key Light (brightest) should be positioned behind the camera, off to the side and at roughly a 45 degree angle above your head. Point 2: The Fill Light (second brightest) should be placed on the opposite side of the camera and used to fill in the shadows created by the Key. It too should be about 45 degrees above your head. Point 3: The Back Light (dimmest) should be placed behind and to one side. It provides dimension to the video by lighting your hair and shoulders. Diffuse the light to soften the shadows. Use diffusion materials purchased from a camera store or improvise using parchment paper or vellum. Everyone’s features are different, so start with the 3- point lighting scheme and make adjustments for your particular situation. Audio Capture Built-in microphones may not be good enough. If using an external microphone, place it a natural distance from you to capture the volume level suggested by the camera. It should not be in the shot nor create shadows. If the audio you capture has a thin quality or has faint echoes, do what you can to soften the hard surfaces in the room. Hang acoustic foam panels or draperies on the walls, and lay down carpeting.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 2Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 115. Setting Up Your Studio Consider the best location to meet your goals. Shooting in the learner’s natural habitat is often a good way to connect with them. • Should you be in an office or out in the field? • Would it be better to be in a branded or green screen studio? Decorate your set to work in harmony with your brand, try to keep things balanced and eliminate distractions. Avoid sets that look too sterile, staged or cluttered. Wardrobe, Hair & Keep your appearance appropriate for your Complexion organization, choose items that flatter and eliminate distractions. When choosing your wardrobe, opt for solids that contrast with each other and your surroundings. Avoid: • Loud patterns and stripes, which can cause video “noise.” • White, which can negatively affect the white balance setting on the camera. Pay attention to your hair. Keep it off your face, and get rid of fly-aways. The camera and lighting can make your complexion look unattractive. Improve your skin’s appearance by applying a light layer of skin-tone powder. Reapply often to tone down shine created by the lights. Editing When editing, keep things simple. Avoid the temptation to use fancy transitions and effects. They do little to advance the learning, and call too much attention to themselves. When shopping for editing software, look for the ability to: • Export and work with course-building software, SCORM and LMS • Import a variety of video & image formats • Run multiple video & audio tracks • Edit sound including noise reduction • Add text & titlesDown Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 3Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 116. Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 4Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 117. Engaging Learners On Camera Find your focus. The key to looking & sounding natural on video is to Be yourself. be engaged. This means you need to be in control of your Only better. thoughts, your movement and your speech. To do this, work hard to: • Find your focus: Pause to calm your racing mind and to think clearly. • Be yourself: Make sure the person captured on video looks, sounds and acts like the most professional and conversational version of the real you. • Only better: You may need to adapt to the complexities of video by slowing your speaking pace, moving less, smiling more, and so on. Identify Who You Are Address a single person with whom you have a Talking To friendly relationship. Doing this, rather than speaking to a faceless group of people, will make your video feel more personal. It will also positively affect your tone, enthusiasm and word choice. Make solid eye contact with the camera’s lens. Avoid looking to the side or beyond the camera; both will make you appear as if you’re disengaged or reading from a script.Find your focus. Be yourself. Only better.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 5Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 118. Be Clear, Concise, The first step to a successful video shoot is to start with an Conversational, Not excellent instructional design from which a script or Scripted detailed outline can be written. (see handout, page 7) Then, the key to sounding spontaneous and conversational is to wean yourself off of it by creating notes from which you can improvise. We recommend this process. Start with Excellent Instructional Design Write Script or Detailed Outline Gather Thoughts, Make Connections Create Notes as Cue Cards Review Out Loud Smile, Engage Your Friend, and… Action!Other Recommendations Do not use a teleprompter. Learn to sneak a peek. Be patient & ask it of others. Take breaks. Break it down into manageable clips. Understand what can be edited & what can’t. Do as many takes as it takes. Do not settle for just OK, but do not strive for perfection either.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 6Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 119. SAMPLE Excerpt from a Shooting ScriptClip Visual Content NotesClip 6 Video of Greg Once you’ve zeroed in on the one person you’re speaking to, you’re more likely to sound conversational and natural. However, if you’ve done your planning, you probably have a script or at least an outline that you’re working from. So, how do you follow your script, engage your friend AND sound conversational? The answer lies in not memorizing your script or using an ad hoc teleprompter. While these ideas may seem logical, they don’t work because: • Stiff • Unnatural • Reading Instead make notes for yourself and improvise around them. Now, I’m not recommending never writing out a script. The exercise of writing it out can really help you focus your thoughts, surface new ideas and logically string concepts together across multiple video clips. But once the camera is rolling you need to abandon the script, scribble notes, place them within eye sight, and improvise your way around them.Clip 7 Cut, fade back Here’s how I do it. Pull script into view to Greg • For me, no more than 2/3 page and refer to it. • Before camera rolls I look at my script Should I write on the Here’s my script for this shot you’re watching right now. I have it right here out of the shot so I can white board? Just hold reference it at any time. But before we turned on the camera, I jotted down some notes on a white board a marker? and placed it right there (point to white board placement). Before hitting record: • Review notes, get my head together • Engage the camera • Go Sometimes I can get through the entire clip without any trouble. Other times I need to sneak a peek. (Show example.) It should look like I’m looking into thin air and grabbing a thought. But it’s a learned skill, and I’m not always successful. Experiment and see what works for you.Clip 8 Fade through As I’ve said, the goal should be to sound conversational. This can be challenging if your script is too long. Use this fade as an black, back to Now, you may have noticed that we just faded through black in the edit. This is a technique you can use example of what to do Greg to cut your script into more manageable chunks, which will make you more likely to sound conversational to break a clip into and natural. manageable chunks.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 7Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 120. About your Presenter – Greg Owen-Boger Greg Owen-Boger is the Vice President of Turpin Communication, a presentation and facilitation skills training company based in Chicago. Schooled in management and the performing arts, Greg brings a diverse set of skills and experiences to the organization. He joined Turpin in 1995 as a camera man and quickly worked his way up. He now serves as a communication trainer and coach for Turpin’s largest clients. He also oversees all aspects of their E-Learning (www.onlinepresentationskillstraining.com) and blended learning (www.turpincommunication.com/ecoach.php) platforms including instructional design, script development, production and LMS deployment. He also appears on camera as a subject matter expert.Most recently Greg partnered with KinetiCast, a unique sales video/presentation tool, to provide theirusers with practical online how-to videos to help them shoot better on-the-fly video presentations.greg@turpincommunication.com773-256-9406www.linkedin.com/in/gregowenbogerFounded in 1992, Turpin Communication is a presentation and facilitation training company based inChicago.We take a personalized and comprehensive skill-building approach to our work. This means thatlearners always work on their own real-life content, and over the course of a 12-month blendedlearning program, concepts are introduced, practiced, refined and reinforced.Here are some guiding principles woven into the fabric of all we do.Business presentations are not the same things as speeches. Presentations should be thoughtof more as “orderly conversations.” Orderly because they should be carefully planned; conversationalbecause they need to have the lively quality of spontaneous dialogue.Everyone has what we call a “Default Approach” to presenting. Some default to the orderlyside of presenting, others to the conversational. Understanding one’s default – and makingappropriate adjustments to make up for the associated weaknesses – is key to a presenter’s success.Engaging listeners, that is calming the racing mind and connecting with the individuals in the room,is critical to every presenter’s ability to successfully manage all of their orderly conversations. Whenpresenters are engaged, their natural skills and personalities emerge. They are self-aware and able tomanage the complexities of presenting.Facilitating is an extension of presenting. No matter the purpose behind any facilitated event, thecontent needs to be organized and introduced appropriately. Doing so requires the same skills aspresenting. Therefore, facilitation sessions begin by developing those skills. TurpinCommunication.com OnlinePresentationSkillsTraining.com Facebook.com/TurpinCommunicationDown Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 8Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 121. Down & Dirty Video:Practical strategies for producing engaging E-Learning video on a budget Video Production Basics Video Production 1. Start with a well-planned instructional design Principles for with clear goals & learning objectives E-Learning 2. Consider your brand Then: • Identify video opportunities to support #1 • Shoot video consistent with #2 • Eliminate distractions for both Camera Type, Placement When choosing a camera, consider: Angle & Framing • Standard vs. high definition • Media storage and communication with editing software • Audio quality & capture method Place the camera a good distance from you and zoom in. Putting the camera too close can distort your facial features. Angle the camera so that it is at eye level, which is the most natural placement from the viewer’s perspective. Placing it too high or too low can lookThe rule of thirds strange. Frame yourself in an interesting way. Follow the rule of thirds and position your head within the frame at roughly the intersection of the lines in the illustration. Allow some headroom and looking room so you don’t appear cramped. Adjust the tilt so that horizontal and vertical lines in the shot appear level.Find your focus. Be yourself. Only better.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 1Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 122. Lighting that Flatters Flatter your facial features by lighting yourself well. It’s best to start with a dark room and build a 3-point lighting plot from scratch.3-point lighting Point 1: The Key Light (brightest) should be positioned behind the camera, off to the side and at roughly a 45 degree angle above your head. Point 2: The Fill Light (second brightest) should be placed on the opposite side of the camera and used to fill in the shadows created by the Key. It too should be about 45 degrees above your head. Point 3: The Back Light (dimmest) should be placed behind and to one side. It provides dimension to the video by lighting your hair and shoulders. Diffuse the light to soften the shadows. Use diffusion materials purchased from a camera store or improvise using parchment paper or vellum. Everyone’s features are different, so start with the 3- point lighting scheme and make adjustments for your particular situation. Audio Capture Built-in microphones may not be good enough. If using an external microphone, place it a natural distance from you to capture the volume level suggested by the camera. It should not be in the shot nor create shadows. If the audio you capture has a thin quality or has faint echoes, do what you can to soften the hard surfaces in the room. Hang acoustic foam panels or draperies on the walls, and lay down carpeting.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 2Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 123. Setting Up Your Studio Consider the best location to meet your goals. Shooting in the learner’s natural habitat is often a good way to connect with them. • Should you be in an office or out in the field? • Would it be better to be in a branded or green screen studio? Decorate your set to work in harmony with your brand, try to keep things balanced and eliminate distractions. Avoid sets that look too sterile, staged or cluttered. Wardrobe, Hair & Keep your appearance appropriate for your Complexion organization, choose items that flatter and eliminate distractions. When choosing your wardrobe, opt for solids that contrast with each other and your surroundings. Avoid: • Loud patterns and stripes, which can cause video “noise.” • White, which can negatively affect the white balance setting on the camera. Pay attention to your hair. Keep it off your face, and get rid of fly-aways. The camera and lighting can make your complexion look unattractive. Improve your skin’s appearance by applying a light layer of skin-tone powder. Reapply often to tone down shine created by the lights. Editing When editing, keep things simple. Avoid the temptation to use fancy transitions and effects. They do little to advance the learning, and call too much attention to themselves. When shopping for editing software, look for the ability to: • Export and work with course-building software, SCORM and LMS • Import a variety of video & image formats • Run multiple video & audio tracks • Edit sound including noise reduction • Add text & titlesDown Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 3Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 124. Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 4Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 125. Engaging Learners On Camera Find your focus. The key to looking & sounding natural on video is to Be yourself. be engaged. This means you need to be in control of your Only better. thoughts, your movement and your speech. To do this, work hard to: • Find your focus: Pause to calm your racing mind and to think clearly. • Be yourself: Make sure the person captured on video looks, sounds and acts like the most professional and conversational version of the real you. • Only better: You may need to adapt to the complexities of video by slowing your speaking pace, moving less, smiling more, and so on. Identify Who You Are Address a single person with whom you have a Talking To friendly relationship. Doing this, rather than speaking to a faceless group of people, will make your video feel more personal. It will also positively affect your tone, enthusiasm and word choice. Make solid eye contact with the camera’s lens. Avoid looking to the side or beyond the camera; both will make you appear as if you’re disengaged or reading from a script.Find your focus. Be yourself. Only better.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 5Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 126. Be Clear, Concise, The first step to a successful video shoot is to start with an Conversational, Not excellent instructional design from which a script or Scripted detailed outline can be written. (see handout, page 7) Then, the key to sounding spontaneous and conversational is to wean yourself off of it by creating notes from which you can improvise. We recommend this process. Start with Excellent Instructional Design Write Script or Detailed Outline Gather Thoughts, Make Connections Create Notes as Cue Cards Review Out Loud Smile, Engage Your Friend, and… Action!Other Recommendations Do not use a teleprompter. Learn to sneak a peek. Be patient & ask it of others. Take breaks. Break it down into manageable clips. Understand what can be edited & what can’t. Do as many takes as it takes. Do not settle for just OK, but do not strive for perfection either.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 6Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 127. SAMPLE Excerpt from a Shooting ScriptClip Visual Content NotesClip 6 Video of Greg Once you’ve zeroed in on the one person you’re speaking to, you’re more likely to sound conversational and natural. However, if you’ve done your planning, you probably have a script or at least an outline that you’re working from. So, how do you follow your script, engage your friend AND sound conversational? The answer lies in not memorizing your script or using an ad hoc teleprompter. While these ideas may seem logical, they don’t work because: • Stiff • Unnatural • Reading Instead make notes for yourself and improvise around them. Now, I’m not recommending never writing out a script. The exercise of writing it out can really help you focus your thoughts, surface new ideas and logically string concepts together across multiple video clips. But once the camera is rolling you need to abandon the script, scribble notes, place them within eye sight, and improvise your way around them.Clip 7 Cut, fade back Here’s how I do it. Pull script into view to Greg • For me, no more than 2/3 page and refer to it. • Before camera rolls I look at my script Should I write on the Here’s my script for this shot you’re watching right now. I have it right here out of the shot so I can white board? Just hold reference it at any time. But before we turned on the camera, I jotted down some notes on a white board a marker? and placed it right there (point to white board placement). Before hitting record: • Review notes, get my head together • Engage the camera • Go Sometimes I can get through the entire clip without any trouble. Other times I need to sneak a peek. (Show example.) It should look like I’m looking into thin air and grabbing a thought. But it’s a learned skill, and I’m not always successful. Experiment and see what works for you.Clip 8 Fade through As I’ve said, the goal should be to sound conversational. This can be challenging if your script is too long. Use this fade as an black, back to Now, you may have noticed that we just faded through black in the edit. This is a technique you can use example of what to do Greg to cut your script into more manageable chunks, which will make you more likely to sound conversational to break a clip into and natural. manageable chunks.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 7Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 128. About your Presenter – Greg Owen-Boger Greg Owen-Boger is the Vice President of Turpin Communication, a presentation and facilitation skills training company based in Chicago. Schooled in management and the performing arts, Greg brings a diverse set of skills and experiences to the organization. He joined Turpin in 1995 as a camera man and quickly worked his way up. He now serves as a communication trainer and coach for Turpin’s largest clients. He also oversees all aspects of their E-Learning (www.onlinepresentationskillstraining.com) and blended learning (www.turpincommunication.com/ecoach.php) platforms including instructional design, script development, production and LMS deployment. He also appears on camera as a subject matter expert.Most recently Greg partnered with KinetiCast, a unique sales video/presentation tool, to provide theirusers with practical online how-to videos to help them shoot better on-the-fly video presentations.greg@turpincommunication.com773-256-9406www.linkedin.com/in/gregowenbogerFounded in 1992, Turpin Communication is a presentation and facilitation training company based inChicago.We take a personalized and comprehensive skill-building approach to our work. This means thatlearners always work on their own real-life content, and over the course of a 12-month blendedlearning program, concepts are introduced, practiced, refined and reinforced.Here are some guiding principles woven into the fabric of all we do.Business presentations are not the same things as speeches. Presentations should be thoughtof more as “orderly conversations.” Orderly because they should be carefully planned; conversationalbecause they need to have the lively quality of spontaneous dialogue.Everyone has what we call a “Default Approach” to presenting. Some default to the orderlyside of presenting, others to the conversational. Understanding one’s default – and makingappropriate adjustments to make up for the associated weaknesses – is key to a presenter’s success.Engaging listeners, that is calming the racing mind and connecting with the individuals in the room,is critical to every presenter’s ability to successfully manage all of their orderly conversations. Whenpresenters are engaged, their natural skills and personalities emerge. They are self-aware and able tomanage the complexities of presenting.Facilitating is an extension of presenting. No matter the purpose behind any facilitated event, thecontent needs to be organized and introduced appropriately. Doing so requires the same skills aspresenting. Therefore, facilitation sessions begin by developing those skills. TurpinCommunication.com OnlinePresentationSkillsTraining.com Facebook.com/TurpinCommunicationDown Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 8Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 129. Down & Dirty Video:Practical strategies for producing engaging E-Learning video on a budget Video Production Basics Video Production 1. Start with a well-planned instructional design Principles for with clear goals & learning objectives E-Learning 2. Consider your brand Then: • Identify video opportunities to support #1 • Shoot video consistent with #2 • Eliminate distractions for both Camera Type, Placement When choosing a camera, consider: Angle & Framing • Standard vs. high definition • Media storage and communication with editing software • Audio quality & capture method Place the camera a good distance from you and zoom in. Putting the camera too close can distort your facial features. Angle the camera so that it is at eye level, which is the most natural placement from the viewer’s perspective. Placing it too high or too low can lookThe rule of thirds strange. Frame yourself in an interesting way. Follow the rule of thirds and position your head within the frame at roughly the intersection of the lines in the illustration. Allow some headroom and looking room so you don’t appear cramped. Adjust the tilt so that horizontal and vertical lines in the shot appear level.Find your focus. Be yourself. Only better.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 1Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 130. Lighting that Flatters Flatter your facial features by lighting yourself well. It’s best to start with a dark room and build a 3-point lighting plot from scratch.3-point lighting Point 1: The Key Light (brightest) should be positioned behind the camera, off to the side and at roughly a 45 degree angle above your head. Point 2: The Fill Light (second brightest) should be placed on the opposite side of the camera and used to fill in the shadows created by the Key. It too should be about 45 degrees above your head. Point 3: The Back Light (dimmest) should be placed behind and to one side. It provides dimension to the video by lighting your hair and shoulders. Diffuse the light to soften the shadows. Use diffusion materials purchased from a camera store or improvise using parchment paper or vellum. Everyone’s features are different, so start with the 3- point lighting scheme and make adjustments for your particular situation. Audio Capture Built-in microphones may not be good enough. If using an external microphone, place it a natural distance from you to capture the volume level suggested by the camera. It should not be in the shot nor create shadows. If the audio you capture has a thin quality or has faint echoes, do what you can to soften the hard surfaces in the room. Hang acoustic foam panels or draperies on the walls, and lay down carpeting.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 2Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 131. Setting Up Your Studio Consider the best location to meet your goals. Shooting in the learner’s natural habitat is often a good way to connect with them. • Should you be in an office or out in the field? • Would it be better to be in a branded or green screen studio? Decorate your set to work in harmony with your brand, try to keep things balanced and eliminate distractions. Avoid sets that look too sterile, staged or cluttered. Wardrobe, Hair & Keep your appearance appropriate for your Complexion organization, choose items that flatter and eliminate distractions. When choosing your wardrobe, opt for solids that contrast with each other and your surroundings. Avoid: • Loud patterns and stripes, which can cause video “noise.” • White, which can negatively affect the white balance setting on the camera. Pay attention to your hair. Keep it off your face, and get rid of fly-aways. The camera and lighting can make your complexion look unattractive. Improve your skin’s appearance by applying a light layer of skin-tone powder. Reapply often to tone down shine created by the lights. Editing When editing, keep things simple. Avoid the temptation to use fancy transitions and effects. They do little to advance the learning, and call too much attention to themselves. When shopping for editing software, look for the ability to: • Export and work with course-building software, SCORM and LMS • Import a variety of video & image formats • Run multiple video & audio tracks • Edit sound including noise reduction • Add text & titlesDown Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 3Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 132. Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 4Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 133. Engaging Learners On Camera Find your focus. The key to looking & sounding natural on video is to Be yourself. be engaged. This means you need to be in control of your Only better. thoughts, your movement and your speech. To do this, work hard to: • Find your focus: Pause to calm your racing mind and to think clearly. • Be yourself: Make sure the person captured on video looks, sounds and acts like the most professional and conversational version of the real you. • Only better: You may need to adapt to the complexities of video by slowing your speaking pace, moving less, smiling more, and so on. Identify Who You Are Address a single person with whom you have a Talking To friendly relationship. Doing this, rather than speaking to a faceless group of people, will make your video feel more personal. It will also positively affect your tone, enthusiasm and word choice. Make solid eye contact with the camera’s lens. Avoid looking to the side or beyond the camera; both will make you appear as if you’re disengaged or reading from a script.Find your focus. Be yourself. Only better.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 5Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 134. Be Clear, Concise, The first step to a successful video shoot is to start with an Conversational, Not excellent instructional design from which a script or Scripted detailed outline can be written. (see handout, page 7) Then, the key to sounding spontaneous and conversational is to wean yourself off of it by creating notes from which you can improvise. We recommend this process. Start with Excellent Instructional Design Write Script or Detailed Outline Gather Thoughts, Make Connections Create Notes as Cue Cards Review Out Loud Smile, Engage Your Friend, and… Action!Other Recommendations Do not use a teleprompter. Learn to sneak a peek. Be patient & ask it of others. Take breaks. Break it down into manageable clips. Understand what can be edited & what can’t. Do as many takes as it takes. Do not settle for just OK, but do not strive for perfection either.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 6Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 135. SAMPLE Excerpt from a Shooting ScriptClip Visual Content NotesClip 6 Video of Greg Once you’ve zeroed in on the one person you’re speaking to, you’re more likely to sound conversational and natural. However, if you’ve done your planning, you probably have a script or at least an outline that you’re working from. So, how do you follow your script, engage your friend AND sound conversational? The answer lies in not memorizing your script or using an ad hoc teleprompter. While these ideas may seem logical, they don’t work because: • Stiff • Unnatural • Reading Instead make notes for yourself and improvise around them. Now, I’m not recommending never writing out a script. The exercise of writing it out can really help you focus your thoughts, surface new ideas and logically string concepts together across multiple video clips. But once the camera is rolling you need to abandon the script, scribble notes, place them within eye sight, and improvise your way around them.Clip 7 Cut, fade back Here’s how I do it. Pull script into view to Greg • For me, no more than 2/3 page and refer to it. • Before camera rolls I look at my script Should I write on the Here’s my script for this shot you’re watching right now. I have it right here out of the shot so I can white board? Just hold reference it at any time. But before we turned on the camera, I jotted down some notes on a white board a marker? and placed it right there (point to white board placement). Before hitting record: • Review notes, get my head together • Engage the camera • Go Sometimes I can get through the entire clip without any trouble. Other times I need to sneak a peek. (Show example.) It should look like I’m looking into thin air and grabbing a thought. But it’s a learned skill, and I’m not always successful. Experiment and see what works for you.Clip 8 Fade through As I’ve said, the goal should be to sound conversational. This can be challenging if your script is too long. Use this fade as an black, back to Now, you may have noticed that we just faded through black in the edit. This is a technique you can use example of what to do Greg to cut your script into more manageable chunks, which will make you more likely to sound conversational to break a clip into and natural. manageable chunks.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 7Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 136. About your Presenter – Greg Owen-Boger Greg Owen-Boger is the Vice President of Turpin Communication, a presentation and facilitation skills training company based in Chicago. Schooled in management and the performing arts, Greg brings a diverse set of skills and experiences to the organization. He joined Turpin in 1995 as a camera man and quickly worked his way up. He now serves as a communication trainer and coach for Turpin’s largest clients. He also oversees all aspects of their E-Learning (www.onlinepresentationskillstraining.com) and blended learning (www.turpincommunication.com/ecoach.php) platforms including instructional design, script development, production and LMS deployment. He also appears on camera as a subject matter expert.Most recently Greg partnered with KinetiCast, a unique sales video/presentation tool, to provide theirusers with practical online how-to videos to help them shoot better on-the-fly video presentations.greg@turpincommunication.com773-256-9406www.linkedin.com/in/gregowenbogerFounded in 1992, Turpin Communication is a presentation and facilitation training company based inChicago.We take a personalized and comprehensive skill-building approach to our work. This means thatlearners always work on their own real-life content, and over the course of a 12-month blendedlearning program, concepts are introduced, practiced, refined and reinforced.Here are some guiding principles woven into the fabric of all we do.Business presentations are not the same things as speeches. Presentations should be thoughtof more as “orderly conversations.” Orderly because they should be carefully planned; conversationalbecause they need to have the lively quality of spontaneous dialogue.Everyone has what we call a “Default Approach” to presenting. Some default to the orderlyside of presenting, others to the conversational. Understanding one’s default – and makingappropriate adjustments to make up for the associated weaknesses – is key to a presenter’s success.Engaging listeners, that is calming the racing mind and connecting with the individuals in the room,is critical to every presenter’s ability to successfully manage all of their orderly conversations. Whenpresenters are engaged, their natural skills and personalities emerge. They are self-aware and able tomanage the complexities of presenting.Facilitating is an extension of presenting. No matter the purpose behind any facilitated event, thecontent needs to be organized and introduced appropriately. Doing so requires the same skills aspresenting. Therefore, facilitation sessions begin by developing those skills. TurpinCommunication.com OnlinePresentationSkillsTraining.com Facebook.com/TurpinCommunicationDown Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 8Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 137. Down & Dirty Video:Practical strategies for producing engaging E-Learning video on a budget Video Production Basics Video Production 1. Start with a well-planned instructional design Principles for with clear goals & learning objectives E-Learning 2. Consider your brand Then: • Identify video opportunities to support #1 • Shoot video consistent with #2 • Eliminate distractions for both Camera Type, Placement When choosing a camera, consider: Angle & Framing • Standard vs. high definition • Media storage and communication with editing software • Audio quality & capture method Place the camera a good distance from you and zoom in. Putting the camera too close can distort your facial features. Angle the camera so that it is at eye level, which is the most natural placement from the viewer’s perspective. Placing it too high or too low can lookThe rule of thirds strange. Frame yourself in an interesting way. Follow the rule of thirds and position your head within the frame at roughly the intersection of the lines in the illustration. Allow some headroom and looking room so you don’t appear cramped. Adjust the tilt so that horizontal and vertical lines in the shot appear level.Find your focus. Be yourself. Only better.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 1Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 138. Lighting that Flatters Flatter your facial features by lighting yourself well. It’s best to start with a dark room and build a 3-point lighting plot from scratch.3-point lighting Point 1: The Key Light (brightest) should be positioned behind the camera, off to the side and at roughly a 45 degree angle above your head. Point 2: The Fill Light (second brightest) should be placed on the opposite side of the camera and used to fill in the shadows created by the Key. It too should be about 45 degrees above your head. Point 3: The Back Light (dimmest) should be placed behind and to one side. It provides dimension to the video by lighting your hair and shoulders. Diffuse the light to soften the shadows. Use diffusion materials purchased from a camera store or improvise using parchment paper or vellum. Everyone’s features are different, so start with the 3- point lighting scheme and make adjustments for your particular situation. Audio Capture Built-in microphones may not be good enough. If using an external microphone, place it a natural distance from you to capture the volume level suggested by the camera. It should not be in the shot nor create shadows. If the audio you capture has a thin quality or has faint echoes, do what you can to soften the hard surfaces in the room. Hang acoustic foam panels or draperies on the walls, and lay down carpeting.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 2Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 139. Setting Up Your Studio Consider the best location to meet your goals. Shooting in the learner’s natural habitat is often a good way to connect with them. • Should you be in an office or out in the field? • Would it be better to be in a branded or green screen studio? Decorate your set to work in harmony with your brand, try to keep things balanced and eliminate distractions. Avoid sets that look too sterile, staged or cluttered. Wardrobe, Hair & Keep your appearance appropriate for your Complexion organization, choose items that flatter and eliminate distractions. When choosing your wardrobe, opt for solids that contrast with each other and your surroundings. Avoid: • Loud patterns and stripes, which can cause video “noise.” • White, which can negatively affect the white balance setting on the camera. Pay attention to your hair. Keep it off your face, and get rid of fly-aways. The camera and lighting can make your complexion look unattractive. Improve your skin’s appearance by applying a light layer of skin-tone powder. Reapply often to tone down shine created by the lights. Editing When editing, keep things simple. Avoid the temptation to use fancy transitions and effects. They do little to advance the learning, and call too much attention to themselves. When shopping for editing software, look for the ability to: • Export and work with course-building software, SCORM and LMS • Import a variety of video & image formats • Run multiple video & audio tracks • Edit sound including noise reduction • Add text & titlesDown Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 3Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 140. Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 4Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 141. Engaging Learners On Camera Find your focus. The key to looking & sounding natural on video is to Be yourself. be engaged. This means you need to be in control of your Only better. thoughts, your movement and your speech. To do this, work hard to: • Find your focus: Pause to calm your racing mind and to think clearly. • Be yourself: Make sure the person captured on video looks, sounds and acts like the most professional and conversational version of the real you. • Only better: You may need to adapt to the complexities of video by slowing your speaking pace, moving less, smiling more, and so on. Identify Who You Are Address a single person with whom you have a Talking To friendly relationship. Doing this, rather than speaking to a faceless group of people, will make your video feel more personal. It will also positively affect your tone, enthusiasm and word choice. Make solid eye contact with the camera’s lens. Avoid looking to the side or beyond the camera; both will make you appear as if you’re disengaged or reading from a script.Find your focus. Be yourself. Only better.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 5Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 142. Be Clear, Concise, The first step to a successful video shoot is to start with an Conversational, Not excellent instructional design from which a script or Scripted detailed outline can be written. (see handout, page 7) Then, the key to sounding spontaneous and conversational is to wean yourself off of it by creating notes from which you can improvise. We recommend this process. Start with Excellent Instructional Design Write Script or Detailed Outline Gather Thoughts, Make Connections Create Notes as Cue Cards Review Out Loud Smile, Engage Your Friend, and… Action!Other Recommendations Do not use a teleprompter. Learn to sneak a peek. Be patient & ask it of others. Take breaks. Break it down into manageable clips. Understand what can be edited & what can’t. Do as many takes as it takes. Do not settle for just OK, but do not strive for perfection either.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 6Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 143. SAMPLE Excerpt from a Shooting ScriptClip Visual Content NotesClip 6 Video of Greg Once you’ve zeroed in on the one person you’re speaking to, you’re more likely to sound conversational and natural. However, if you’ve done your planning, you probably have a script or at least an outline that you’re working from. So, how do you follow your script, engage your friend AND sound conversational? The answer lies in not memorizing your script or using an ad hoc teleprompter. While these ideas may seem logical, they don’t work because: • Stiff • Unnatural • Reading Instead make notes for yourself and improvise around them. Now, I’m not recommending never writing out a script. The exercise of writing it out can really help you focus your thoughts, surface new ideas and logically string concepts together across multiple video clips. But once the camera is rolling you need to abandon the script, scribble notes, place them within eye sight, and improvise your way around them.Clip 7 Cut, fade back Here’s how I do it. Pull script into view to Greg • For me, no more than 2/3 page and refer to it. • Before camera rolls I look at my script Should I write on the Here’s my script for this shot you’re watching right now. I have it right here out of the shot so I can white board? Just hold reference it at any time. But before we turned on the camera, I jotted down some notes on a white board a marker? and placed it right there (point to white board placement). Before hitting record: • Review notes, get my head together • Engage the camera • Go Sometimes I can get through the entire clip without any trouble. Other times I need to sneak a peek. (Show example.) It should look like I’m looking into thin air and grabbing a thought. But it’s a learned skill, and I’m not always successful. Experiment and see what works for you.Clip 8 Fade through As I’ve said, the goal should be to sound conversational. This can be challenging if your script is too long. Use this fade as an black, back to Now, you may have noticed that we just faded through black in the edit. This is a technique you can use example of what to do Greg to cut your script into more manageable chunks, which will make you more likely to sound conversational to break a clip into and natural. manageable chunks.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 7Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 144. About your Presenter – Greg Owen-Boger Greg Owen-Boger is the Vice President of Turpin Communication, a presentation and facilitation skills training company based in Chicago. Schooled in management and the performing arts, Greg brings a diverse set of skills and experiences to the organization. He joined Turpin in 1995 as a camera man and quickly worked his way up. He now serves as a communication trainer and coach for Turpin’s largest clients. He also oversees all aspects of their E-Learning (www.onlinepresentationskillstraining.com) and blended learning (www.turpincommunication.com/ecoach.php) platforms including instructional design, script development, production and LMS deployment. He also appears on camera as a subject matter expert.Most recently Greg partnered with KinetiCast, a unique sales video/presentation tool, to provide theirusers with practical online how-to videos to help them shoot better on-the-fly video presentations.greg@turpincommunication.com773-256-9406www.linkedin.com/in/gregowenbogerFounded in 1992, Turpin Communication is a presentation and facilitation training company based inChicago.We take a personalized and comprehensive skill-building approach to our work. This means thatlearners always work on their own real-life content, and over the course of a 12-month blendedlearning program, concepts are introduced, practiced, refined and reinforced.Here are some guiding principles woven into the fabric of all we do.Business presentations are not the same things as speeches. Presentations should be thoughtof more as “orderly conversations.” Orderly because they should be carefully planned; conversationalbecause they need to have the lively quality of spontaneous dialogue.Everyone has what we call a “Default Approach” to presenting. Some default to the orderlyside of presenting, others to the conversational. Understanding one’s default – and makingappropriate adjustments to make up for the associated weaknesses – is key to a presenter’s success.Engaging listeners, that is calming the racing mind and connecting with the individuals in the room,is critical to every presenter’s ability to successfully manage all of their orderly conversations. Whenpresenters are engaged, their natural skills and personalities emerge. They are self-aware and able tomanage the complexities of presenting.Facilitating is an extension of presenting. No matter the purpose behind any facilitated event, thecontent needs to be organized and introduced appropriately. Doing so requires the same skills aspresenting. Therefore, facilitation sessions begin by developing those skills. TurpinCommunication.com OnlinePresentationSkillsTraining.com Facebook.com/TurpinCommunicationDown Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 8Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 145. Down & Dirty Video:Practical strategies for producing engaging E-Learning video on a budget Video Production Basics Video Production 1. Start with a well-planned instructional design Principles for with clear goals & learning objectives E-Learning 2. Consider your brand Then: • Identify video opportunities to support #1 • Shoot video consistent with #2 • Eliminate distractions for both Camera Type, Placement When choosing a camera, consider: Angle & Framing • Standard vs. high definition • Media storage and communication with editing software • Audio quality & capture method Place the camera a good distance from you and zoom in. Putting the camera too close can distort your facial features. Angle the camera so that it is at eye level, which is the most natural placement from the viewer’s perspective. Placing it too high or too low can lookThe rule of thirds strange. Frame yourself in an interesting way. Follow the rule of thirds and position your head within the frame at roughly the intersection of the lines in the illustration. Allow some headroom and looking room so you don’t appear cramped. Adjust the tilt so that horizontal and vertical lines in the shot appear level.Find your focus. Be yourself. Only better.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 1Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 146. Lighting that Flatters Flatter your facial features by lighting yourself well. It’s best to start with a dark room and build a 3-point lighting plot from scratch.3-point lighting Point 1: The Key Light (brightest) should be positioned behind the camera, off to the side and at roughly a 45 degree angle above your head. Point 2: The Fill Light (second brightest) should be placed on the opposite side of the camera and used to fill in the shadows created by the Key. It too should be about 45 degrees above your head. Point 3: The Back Light (dimmest) should be placed behind and to one side. It provides dimension to the video by lighting your hair and shoulders. Diffuse the light to soften the shadows. Use diffusion materials purchased from a camera store or improvise using parchment paper or vellum. Everyone’s features are different, so start with the 3- point lighting scheme and make adjustments for your particular situation. Audio Capture Built-in microphones may not be good enough. If using an external microphone, place it a natural distance from you to capture the volume level suggested by the camera. It should not be in the shot nor create shadows. If the audio you capture has a thin quality or has faint echoes, do what you can to soften the hard surfaces in the room. Hang acoustic foam panels or draperies on the walls, and lay down carpeting.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 2Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 147. Setting Up Your Studio Consider the best location to meet your goals. Shooting in the learner’s natural habitat is often a good way to connect with them. • Should you be in an office or out in the field? • Would it be better to be in a branded or green screen studio? Decorate your set to work in harmony with your brand, try to keep things balanced and eliminate distractions. Avoid sets that look too sterile, staged or cluttered. Wardrobe, Hair & Keep your appearance appropriate for your Complexion organization, choose items that flatter and eliminate distractions. When choosing your wardrobe, opt for solids that contrast with each other and your surroundings. Avoid: • Loud patterns and stripes, which can cause video “noise.” • White, which can negatively affect the white balance setting on the camera. Pay attention to your hair. Keep it off your face, and get rid of fly-aways. The camera and lighting can make your complexion look unattractive. Improve your skin’s appearance by applying a light layer of skin-tone powder. Reapply often to tone down shine created by the lights. Editing When editing, keep things simple. Avoid the temptation to use fancy transitions and effects. They do little to advance the learning, and call too much attention to themselves. When shopping for editing software, look for the ability to: • Export and work with course-building software, SCORM and LMS • Import a variety of video & image formats • Run multiple video & audio tracks • Edit sound including noise reduction • Add text & titlesDown Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 3Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 148. Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 4Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 149. Engaging Learners On Camera Find your focus. The key to looking & sounding natural on video is to Be yourself. be engaged. This means you need to be in control of your Only better. thoughts, your movement and your speech. To do this, work hard to: • Find your focus: Pause to calm your racing mind and to think clearly. • Be yourself: Make sure the person captured on video looks, sounds and acts like the most professional and conversational version of the real you. • Only better: You may need to adapt to the complexities of video by slowing your speaking pace, moving less, smiling more, and so on. Identify Who You Are Address a single person with whom you have a Talking To friendly relationship. Doing this, rather than speaking to a faceless group of people, will make your video feel more personal. It will also positively affect your tone, enthusiasm and word choice. Make solid eye contact with the camera’s lens. Avoid looking to the side or beyond the camera; both will make you appear as if you’re disengaged or reading from a script.Find your focus. Be yourself. Only better.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 5Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 150. Be Clear, Concise, The first step to a successful video shoot is to start with an Conversational, Not excellent instructional design from which a script or Scripted detailed outline can be written. (see handout, page 7) Then, the key to sounding spontaneous and conversational is to wean yourself off of it by creating notes from which you can improvise. We recommend this process. Start with Excellent Instructional Design Write Script or Detailed Outline Gather Thoughts, Make Connections Create Notes as Cue Cards Review Out Loud Smile, Engage Your Friend, and… Action!Other Recommendations Do not use a teleprompter. Learn to sneak a peek. Be patient & ask it of others. Take breaks. Break it down into manageable clips. Understand what can be edited & what can’t. Do as many takes as it takes. Do not settle for just OK, but do not strive for perfection either.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 6Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 151. SAMPLE Excerpt from a Shooting ScriptClip Visual Content NotesClip 6 Video of Greg Once you’ve zeroed in on the one person you’re speaking to, you’re more likely to sound conversational and natural. However, if you’ve done your planning, you probably have a script or at least an outline that you’re working from. So, how do you follow your script, engage your friend AND sound conversational? The answer lies in not memorizing your script or using an ad hoc teleprompter. While these ideas may seem logical, they don’t work because: • Stiff • Unnatural • Reading Instead make notes for yourself and improvise around them. Now, I’m not recommending never writing out a script. The exercise of writing it out can really help you focus your thoughts, surface new ideas and logically string concepts together across multiple video clips. But once the camera is rolling you need to abandon the script, scribble notes, place them within eye sight, and improvise your way around them.Clip 7 Cut, fade back Here’s how I do it. Pull script into view to Greg • For me, no more than 2/3 page and refer to it. • Before camera rolls I look at my script Should I write on the Here’s my script for this shot you’re watching right now. I have it right here out of the shot so I can white board? Just hold reference it at any time. But before we turned on the camera, I jotted down some notes on a white board a marker? and placed it right there (point to white board placement). Before hitting record: • Review notes, get my head together • Engage the camera • Go Sometimes I can get through the entire clip without any trouble. Other times I need to sneak a peek. (Show example.) It should look like I’m looking into thin air and grabbing a thought. But it’s a learned skill, and I’m not always successful. Experiment and see what works for you.Clip 8 Fade through As I’ve said, the goal should be to sound conversational. This can be challenging if your script is too long. Use this fade as an black, back to Now, you may have noticed that we just faded through black in the edit. This is a technique you can use example of what to do Greg to cut your script into more manageable chunks, which will make you more likely to sound conversational to break a clip into and natural. manageable chunks.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 7Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 152. About your Presenter – Greg Owen-Boger Greg Owen-Boger is the Vice President of Turpin Communication, a presentation and facilitation skills training company based in Chicago. Schooled in management and the performing arts, Greg brings a diverse set of skills and experiences to the organization. He joined Turpin in 1995 as a camera man and quickly worked his way up. He now serves as a communication trainer and coach for Turpin’s largest clients. He also oversees all aspects of their E-Learning (www.onlinepresentationskillstraining.com) and blended learning (www.turpincommunication.com/ecoach.php) platforms including instructional design, script development, production and LMS deployment. He also appears on camera as a subject matter expert.Most recently Greg partnered with KinetiCast, a unique sales video/presentation tool, to provide theirusers with practical online how-to videos to help them shoot better on-the-fly video presentations.greg@turpincommunication.com773-256-9406www.linkedin.com/in/gregowenbogerFounded in 1992, Turpin Communication is a presentation and facilitation training company based inChicago.We take a personalized and comprehensive skill-building approach to our work. This means thatlearners always work on their own real-life content, and over the course of a 12-month blendedlearning program, concepts are introduced, practiced, refined and reinforced.Here are some guiding principles woven into the fabric of all we do.Business presentations are not the same things as speeches. Presentations should be thoughtof more as “orderly conversations.” Orderly because they should be carefully planned; conversationalbecause they need to have the lively quality of spontaneous dialogue.Everyone has what we call a “Default Approach” to presenting. Some default to the orderlyside of presenting, others to the conversational. Understanding one’s default – and makingappropriate adjustments to make up for the associated weaknesses – is key to a presenter’s success.Engaging listeners, that is calming the racing mind and connecting with the individuals in the room,is critical to every presenter’s ability to successfully manage all of their orderly conversations. Whenpresenters are engaged, their natural skills and personalities emerge. They are self-aware and able tomanage the complexities of presenting.Facilitating is an extension of presenting. No matter the purpose behind any facilitated event, thecontent needs to be organized and introduced appropriately. Doing so requires the same skills aspresenting. Therefore, facilitation sessions begin by developing those skills. TurpinCommunication.com OnlinePresentationSkillsTraining.com Facebook.com/TurpinCommunicationDown Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 8Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 153. Down & Dirty Video:Practical strategies for producing engaging E-Learning video on a budget Video Production Basics Video Production 1. Start with a well-planned instructional design Principles for with clear goals & learning objectives E-Learning 2. Consider your brand Then: • Identify video opportunities to support #1 • Shoot video consistent with #2 • Eliminate distractions for both Camera Type, Placement When choosing a camera, consider: Angle & Framing • Standard vs. high definition • Media storage and communication with editing software • Audio quality & capture method Place the camera a good distance from you and zoom in. Putting the camera too close can distort your facial features. Angle the camera so that it is at eye level, which is the most natural placement from the viewer’s perspective. Placing it too high or too low can lookThe rule of thirds strange. Frame yourself in an interesting way. Follow the rule of thirds and position your head within the frame at roughly the intersection of the lines in the illustration. Allow some headroom and looking room so you don’t appear cramped. Adjust the tilt so that horizontal and vertical lines in the shot appear level.Find your focus. Be yourself. Only better.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 1Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 154. Lighting that Flatters Flatter your facial features by lighting yourself well. It’s best to start with a dark room and build a 3-point lighting plot from scratch.3-point lighting Point 1: The Key Light (brightest) should be positioned behind the camera, off to the side and at roughly a 45 degree angle above your head. Point 2: The Fill Light (second brightest) should be placed on the opposite side of the camera and used to fill in the shadows created by the Key. It too should be about 45 degrees above your head. Point 3: The Back Light (dimmest) should be placed behind and to one side. It provides dimension to the video by lighting your hair and shoulders. Diffuse the light to soften the shadows. Use diffusion materials purchased from a camera store or improvise using parchment paper or vellum. Everyone’s features are different, so start with the 3- point lighting scheme and make adjustments for your particular situation. Audio Capture Built-in microphones may not be good enough. If using an external microphone, place it a natural distance from you to capture the volume level suggested by the camera. It should not be in the shot nor create shadows. If the audio you capture has a thin quality or has faint echoes, do what you can to soften the hard surfaces in the room. Hang acoustic foam panels or draperies on the walls, and lay down carpeting.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 2Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 155. Setting Up Your Studio Consider the best location to meet your goals. Shooting in the learner’s natural habitat is often a good way to connect with them. • Should you be in an office or out in the field? • Would it be better to be in a branded or green screen studio? Decorate your set to work in harmony with your brand, try to keep things balanced and eliminate distractions. Avoid sets that look too sterile, staged or cluttered. Wardrobe, Hair & Keep your appearance appropriate for your Complexion organization, choose items that flatter and eliminate distractions. When choosing your wardrobe, opt for solids that contrast with each other and your surroundings. Avoid: • Loud patterns and stripes, which can cause video “noise.” • White, which can negatively affect the white balance setting on the camera. Pay attention to your hair. Keep it off your face, and get rid of fly-aways. The camera and lighting can make your complexion look unattractive. Improve your skin’s appearance by applying a light layer of skin-tone powder. Reapply often to tone down shine created by the lights. Editing When editing, keep things simple. Avoid the temptation to use fancy transitions and effects. They do little to advance the learning, and call too much attention to themselves. When shopping for editing software, look for the ability to: • Export and work with course-building software, SCORM and LMS • Import a variety of video & image formats • Run multiple video & audio tracks • Edit sound including noise reduction • Add text & titlesDown Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 3Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 156. Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 4Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 157. Engaging Learners On Camera Find your focus. The key to looking & sounding natural on video is to Be yourself. be engaged. This means you need to be in control of your Only better. thoughts, your movement and your speech. To do this, work hard to: • Find your focus: Pause to calm your racing mind and to think clearly. • Be yourself: Make sure the person captured on video looks, sounds and acts like the most professional and conversational version of the real you. • Only better: You may need to adapt to the complexities of video by slowing your speaking pace, moving less, smiling more, and so on. Identify Who You Are Address a single person with whom you have a Talking To friendly relationship. Doing this, rather than speaking to a faceless group of people, will make your video feel more personal. It will also positively affect your tone, enthusiasm and word choice. Make solid eye contact with the camera’s lens. Avoid looking to the side or beyond the camera; both will make you appear as if you’re disengaged or reading from a script.Find your focus. Be yourself. Only better.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 5Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 158. Be Clear, Concise, The first step to a successful video shoot is to start with an Conversational, Not excellent instructional design from which a script or Scripted detailed outline can be written. (see handout, page 7) Then, the key to sounding spontaneous and conversational is to wean yourself off of it by creating notes from which you can improvise. We recommend this process. Start with Excellent Instructional Design Write Script or Detailed Outline Gather Thoughts, Make Connections Create Notes as Cue Cards Review Out Loud Smile, Engage Your Friend, and… Action!Other Recommendations Do not use a teleprompter. Learn to sneak a peek. Be patient & ask it of others. Take breaks. Break it down into manageable clips. Understand what can be edited & what can’t. Do as many takes as it takes. Do not settle for just OK, but do not strive for perfection either.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 6Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 159. SAMPLE Excerpt from a Shooting ScriptClip Visual Content NotesClip 6 Video of Greg Once you’ve zeroed in on the one person you’re speaking to, you’re more likely to sound conversational and natural. However, if you’ve done your planning, you probably have a script or at least an outline that you’re working from. So, how do you follow your script, engage your friend AND sound conversational? The answer lies in not memorizing your script or using an ad hoc teleprompter. While these ideas may seem logical, they don’t work because: • Stiff • Unnatural • Reading Instead make notes for yourself and improvise around them. Now, I’m not recommending never writing out a script. The exercise of writing it out can really help you focus your thoughts, surface new ideas and logically string concepts together across multiple video clips. But once the camera is rolling you need to abandon the script, scribble notes, place them within eye sight, and improvise your way around them.Clip 7 Cut, fade back Here’s how I do it. Pull script into view to Greg • For me, no more than 2/3 page and refer to it. • Before camera rolls I look at my script Should I write on the Here’s my script for this shot you’re watching right now. I have it right here out of the shot so I can white board? Just hold reference it at any time. But before we turned on the camera, I jotted down some notes on a white board a marker? and placed it right there (point to white board placement). Before hitting record: • Review notes, get my head together • Engage the camera • Go Sometimes I can get through the entire clip without any trouble. Other times I need to sneak a peek. (Show example.) It should look like I’m looking into thin air and grabbing a thought. But it’s a learned skill, and I’m not always successful. Experiment and see what works for you.Clip 8 Fade through As I’ve said, the goal should be to sound conversational. This can be challenging if your script is too long. Use this fade as an black, back to Now, you may have noticed that we just faded through black in the edit. This is a technique you can use example of what to do Greg to cut your script into more manageable chunks, which will make you more likely to sound conversational to break a clip into and natural. manageable chunks.Down Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 7Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication
  • 160. About your Presenter – Greg Owen-Boger Greg Owen-Boger is the Vice President of Turpin Communication, a presentation and facilitation skills training company based in Chicago. Schooled in management and the performing arts, Greg brings a diverse set of skills and experiences to the organization. He joined Turpin in 1995 as a camera man and quickly worked his way up. He now serves as a communication trainer and coach for Turpin’s largest clients. He also oversees all aspects of their E-Learning (www.onlinepresentationskillstraining.com) and blended learning (www.turpincommunication.com/ecoach.php) platforms including instructional design, script development, production and LMS deployment. He also appears on camera as a subject matter expert.Most recently Greg partnered with KinetiCast, a unique sales video/presentation tool, to provide theirusers with practical online how-to videos to help them shoot better on-the-fly video presentations.greg@turpincommunication.com773-256-9406www.linkedin.com/in/gregowenbogerFounded in 1992, Turpin Communication is a presentation and facilitation training company based inChicago.We take a personalized and comprehensive skill-building approach to our work. This means thatlearners always work on their own real-life content, and over the course of a 12-month blendedlearning program, concepts are introduced, practiced, refined and reinforced.Here are some guiding principles woven into the fabric of all we do.Business presentations are not the same things as speeches. Presentations should be thoughtof more as “orderly conversations.” Orderly because they should be carefully planned; conversationalbecause they need to have the lively quality of spontaneous dialogue.Everyone has what we call a “Default Approach” to presenting. Some default to the orderlyside of presenting, others to the conversational. Understanding one’s default – and makingappropriate adjustments to make up for the associated weaknesses – is key to a presenter’s success.Engaging listeners, that is calming the racing mind and connecting with the individuals in the room,is critical to every presenter’s ability to successfully manage all of their orderly conversations. Whenpresenters are engaged, their natural skills and personalities emerge. They are self-aware and able tomanage the complexities of presenting.Facilitating is an extension of presenting. No matter the purpose behind any facilitated event, thecontent needs to be organized and introduced appropriately. Doing so requires the same skills aspresenting. Therefore, facilitation sessions begin by developing those skills. TurpinCommunication.com OnlinePresentationSkillsTraining.com Facebook.com/TurpinCommunicationDown Dirty Video handout draft 1.docx page 8Copyright ©2011 by Turpin Communication

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