CETS 2010, Dannette Nicastro & Christine O'Malley, Participant Guide for Creating Movement and Momentum in the Virtual Classroom
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CETS 2010, Dannette Nicastro & Christine O'Malley, Participant Guide for Creating Movement and Momentum in the Virtual Classroom

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CETS 2010, Dannette Nicastro & Christine O'Malley, Participant Guide for Creating Movement and Momentum in the Virtual Classroom CETS 2010, Dannette Nicastro & Christine O'Malley, Participant Guide for Creating Movement and Momentum in the Virtual Classroom Document Transcript

  • Creating Movement & Momentum in the Virtual Classroom Participant Guide Welcome to Creating Movement & Momentum in the Virtual Classroom, an online module designed to make you more equip in designing for the Virtual Classroom. Chicago e-Learning & Technology Showcase 2010 1|Page
  • Table of Contents WELCOME ........................................................................................................... 3 PROGRAM DESCRIPTION............................................................................................ 3 OBJECTIVES ............................................................................................................ 3 TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE............................................................................................. 4 CONTACT AND LOGISTICAL INFORMATION ...................................................................... 4 GETTING STARTED .............................................................................................. 5 PRIOR TO THE CLASS ................................................................................................. 5 GROUND RULES ...................................................................................................... 5 SYLLABUS............................................................................................................ 7 ACTIVITIES .......................................................................................................... 8 ACTIVITY #1 TAKE A STAND ....................................................................................... 8 ACTIVITY #2 PAIRED INTERVIEWS ................................................................................ 9 ACTIVITY #3 HOOPS AND MARBLES ........................................................................... 10 ACTIVITY #4 PICTURE THIS....................................................................................... 11 ACTIVITY #5 ROUND ROBIN ..................................................................................... 12 ACTIVITY #6 SESSION FUMMARY ............................................................................... 13 FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ...................................................................... 14 GLOSSARY ......................................................................................................... 16 2|Page
  • WELCOME Welcome! I’m your facilitator for this course entitled Creating Movement and Momentum in the Virtual Classroom. In our 50 minutes together we will cover a variety of online activities that get your participants up and moving. We will meet online on Wednesday, August 11 2010 at 10:00 am CST. Please be sure to print this participant guide and use it to help guide you through the program. You should make sure that you have a printed version with you during all live session and refer to it for intersession assignments and instructions. Intersession work must be completed prior to the next scheduled live session. Your progress will be monitored and recorded. Please contact your facilitator if you encounter difficulty in completing the assignments. I look forward to seeing you online! Sincerely, Dannette Nicastro Creative Design Consultant Alliant Quality Partners, Inc. Program Description Before designing or delivering synchronous courses, you need to make sure you understand the learner experience. Creating Movement & Momentum in the Virtual Classroom focuses on designing experiential training that enables participants to move and interact with one another, just as they would in a face to face training session. The program explores the use of synchronous collaboration tools in a way that balances technology with human interaction. This session is a prerequisite to all other sessions. Objectives At the end of this session, participants will be able to Explain the difference between interaction and collaboration in the virtual classroom Apply instructional design techniques that will foster group movement and team activity in a virtual classroom course Length: 1 hour 3|Page
  • Technical Assistance For technical assistance prior to the event, contact techsupport@aqptraining.com. During the class, we will provide you with email and telephone information for live event support. Contact and Logistical Information This information is important in case someone experiences technical difficulties during a class, or when they are moving from one computer to another (for instance work desktop to home laptop). Please complete this list of important logistical information and keep it handy. Lead Facilitator: Lead Producer: Name: Dannette Nicastro Name: Christine O’Malley Phone ________________________ Phone ________________________ Email ________________________ Email ________________________ Time Zone ____________________ Time Zone ____________________ Tech Support For Your Organization: Tech Support for the Software Vendor (if applicable) Name ________________________ Phone ________________________ Email ________________________ Time Zone ____________________ Internal Sponsor Or Lead For Your Organization (if Logon Information: applicable) User ID ________________ Name ________________________ Password ______________ Phone ________________________ Email ________________________ Teleconference Information: (if applicable) Time Zone ____________________ Phone ________________ Pass code ______________ 4|Page
  • Getting Started Prior to the Class Prior to attending this class, you will receive an email with instructions on how to download and test your virtual classroom software. Please make sure you complete this process at least two business days prior to the event, so that, if you have any difficulty, we have time to assist. Letting others know that you are unavailable while in training will also help you to be more focused and experience fewer disruptions. This is a sample of a note you can send to co-workers and associates when you are taking an online course. . Dear colleagues, Today I will be participating in an online class from my desk. I will be online from approximately 1:45 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. I would appreciate it if you would not disturb me during this period of time. If you have an immediate question, please contact Tim Jones at extension 123. If it can wait until after 4:00 p.m., please send me an email and I will follow up with you before the end of the business day. I appreciate your consideration. Sincerely, Ground Rules The online learning environment is new to most of us. If you keep the following ground rules in mind, you will help to create a more effective learning experience for everyone. We will discuss additional ground rules during the online session. 1. Log on to class at least 10 minutes before the scheduled start. This way, class can get started on time. 2. Turn off email and phones and clear other distractions away from your training area. It is easy to answer the phone or pick up some work and lose track of what is going on in the class. The presenter will not know you have “stepped out,” so he or she will not be able to re-engage you successfully. Minimizing distractions also improves your computer performance. 3. Participate and prepare to be called on by name. The online learning environment lends itself to interaction. Participation will keep you engaged and move the class along. If participation is low, the presenter must be able to call on people without physical cues. 4. Raise your hand if you have an immediate question or comment. The presenters cannot tell by looking at you if you are confused on a particular point. Asking questions also helps other participants clarify or reinforce concepts. 5|Page
  • 5. Be patient in waiting for a response to your text message. The presenters are often facilitating the content as well as responding to text chat. Please be patient and trust that you will receive a response to your notes. 6|Page
  • Syllabus List all synchronous (live classes) and asynchronous (independent work) assignments for easy review. Synchronous Sessions & Assignments Asynchronous Assignments Prework  Register for eLearning Conference  Choose this session   Date: August 11th Title of Module  Verify all pre- or intersession work is completed  Send email to your coworkers  Log on 15 minutes early  Make sure to bring your Participant Guide to class 7|Page
  • Activities Define the following: Activity #1 Take a Stand Tool: Pointer - For this activity you will be using your pointer tool. This is located in the annotation toolbar at the top of your screen. By clicking on your picture, you can “walk” (drag your mouse) your picture to your space in the room. 8|Page
  • Activity #2 Paired Interviews Tool: Audio Break Out- Use the following codes to utilize the audio break-out session: Group Enter Room Exit Room Group 1 #1 #1 Group 2 #2 #2 Group 3 #3 #3 Group 4 #4 #4 In your interview, discuss the following 3 items and write down notes about your partner here: 9|Page
  • Activity #3 Hoops and Marbles The objective: Get as many of the balls into your hoop as possible. Guidelines: You many only move one ball at a time into your hoop (no selecting and moving multiple balls). The only whiteboard tool you may use is the pointer tool (no drawing new balls in your hoop). Tool: Pointer - For this activity you will be using your pointer tool. This is located in the annotation toolbar at the top of your screen. By clicking on your picture, you can “grab” (click on the dot in any hoop and drag your mouse) a marble and bring it back to your group. Communication Tool – Private Chat or Audio Break Out Group Enter Room Exit Room Red #1 #1 Blue #2 #2 Purple #3 #3 Orange #4 #4 10 | P a g e
  • Activity #4 Picture This Objective: Use your team’s collective memory to identically reproduce a Domino Pattern currently hidden from your sight. Procedure: Your team will be shown the Domino Pattern together for 30 seconds. During a viewing, the following rules must be followed:  No team members may use any other resources (e.g. pens, paper, dominos, camera phones, etc.). No note taking.  you must keep track of your number of viewings When your construction is complete, ask the facilitator to check your attempt. If it is correct, you have successfully completed the challenge. If it is not correct, you will be given another attempt. You may then have another 30-second viewing of the Domino Pattern and try again. You will be given a new screen with reset Dominos. Scoring: Domino Pattern identically reproduced after only one viewing: 200 points! Reproduced after 2nd viewing: 175 points Reproduced after 3rd viewing: 150 points Reproduced after 4th viewing: 125 points Reproduced after 5th viewing: 100 points Reproduced after 6th viewing: 90 points Reproduced after 7th viewing: 80 points … And so on… Tool: Pointer - For this activity you will be using your pointer tool. This is located in the annotation toolbar at the top of your screen. By clicking on your picture, you can move the Domino on the screen. 11 | P a g e
  • Activity #5 Round Robin Objective: As a team, utilizing the best practices just discussed, analyze the situation and propose a group think solution. If you are not the first team to a scenario, you will read the response from the team(s) before you and place a next to the statement if you agree; an if you need clarification during the group debrief or an if you disagree and then scribe your solution on the whiteboard. (These tools are located in the top annotation tool bar). Save File: Save Powerboard Content You must save any work before the end of the breakout group or it will be lost when you return to the main session. Designate a user to save the whiteboard file to his or her hard drive, or each attendee can save the file. Time: You will have 5 minutes in each room. The facilitator will move you to the next room. Audio: You audio will move with you into your breakout room. NOTE: If you need the facilitator’s assistance, raise your hand or send a private chat. 12 | P a g e
  • Activity #6 Session Fummary (Similar to the Summary, only with some fun mixed in!) Objective: Individually, answer as many of the clues as possible. Time: 5 minutes File Download Directions A new file will be sent directly to you. When the file arrives, a new tab will open on your iLinc application. Their Received Files section shall update to display files that are being sent, pending or available for saving or opening. From this tab, decide to automatically save files transferred to a specific folder or act just open the file when it arrives. All received files display the name of the person that sent the file, the file name, the size and type, and the status. NOTE: No need to print the file, you can use it to solve the puzzle and use the area below to write your answers. 13 | P a g e
  • Frequently Asked Questions What is the value in adding these types of activities? Regardless of the delivery method, well designed training incorporates collaboration and interaction amongst the participants. Energizers, team-building activities and problem-based learning are all incorporated into live, face-to-face training courses….and now you know how to design them for the virtual classroom! Is there time to do these types of activities and still do the “real” training? Well, these activities are part of the “real” training. The activities should be used to kick-off or reinforce your content. There is real value in designing a good debrief for each of these types of activities. Those activities that involve a high level of collaboration, use of technology and interaction may need to be a stand alone class. This is a great way to design a blended learning solution. (See chart for example activity times and suggested group sizes). Group Activity Name Activity Time(includes Tools Size explanation and debrief) 2-20 Take A Stand 5 mins pointer 2-20 Paired Interviews 15 mins Private chat or audio breakout, pointer 10-25 Hoops and Stars 20 mins Private chat or audio breakout, pointer 10-25 Picture This 30 mins Private chat or audio breakout, pointer 5-30 Round Robin Depends on the depth of your Text tool, breakout topics and size of your groups. rooms This could be a quick rotation or in-depth small group discussions 5-30 Crossword Puzzle Depends on difficulty of puzzle. File Sharing Average 10-15 mins Can I do these types of activities with a large crowd? Think of the live classroom design. Could you, as a single instructor handle break out groups with 100 participants? Probably not; large group sessions are appropriate for information dissemination. The larger the group, the more limitations you will have in regards to interaction. You can still use the traditional chat and polling features. A best practice is to have no more than 20 participants in an interactive session. You should also have at least 1 assistant or “producer” to help manage the room and technology. 14 | P a g e
  • Do I need to have a participant guide? YES! It is critical to have a guide that includes directions for utilizing the virtual tools as well as directions for activities. How many of these types of activities should I include in one class/session? Keep in mind; a best practice length for a virtual classroom is no more than 60 minutes or 90 minutes with one included break. Thus, it depends on the activity. You could do a quick “pulse check” like Take A Stand activity at the beginning and end. However, an activity like Picture This may be the only activity that you would incorporate as it would also include a debrief centered around strategy, leadership, team skills etc. 15 | P a g e
  • GLOSSARY Awareness of the following web-based learning terms will assist you as you create effective synchronous programs: Application Viewing/Sharing - A feature that allows the facilitator to share applications with participants over a synchronous application. For example, a facilitator may use application sharing to have participants alter a Microsoft Excel document, even though the participants do not have Excel installed on their own computers. Asynchronous - “Asynchronous” refers to instruction that is not constrained by geography or time. Everyone involved in an asynchronous activity performs his or her part on his or her own time. Audio - The most common synchronous medium. Using audio, the facilitator and participants can talk to one another over the Internet or through a phone bridge (teleconferencing). One-way audio (only the facilitator can speak) or two-way audio (both the facilitator and participants can speak) is available in most synchronous software packages. Bandwidth – The speed at which information is transferred via modem or other network-access device to Internet users. The greater the bandwidth, the more quickly the data (audio, video, text, etc.) reaches the user. Blended Learning - A combination—or blend—of different learning technologies. Blended learning is becoming increasingly common with the availability of both synchronous and asynchronous web-learning options. An example may be a course that consists of an asynchronous web module that covers content and a follow-up synchronous module that allows participants to apply the content. BLOG – An individual or group journal of common interests, recorded on the web. Breakout Sessions – A feature available in some synchronous software packages that allows the facilitator to break a class into smaller groups. Participants are able to interact within their smaller groups and rejoin the main classroom to share their findings with the whole class. Chat - A real-time text conversation between users over the Internet. Whatever a user types is displayed on the other users’ screens as it is entered. Some synchronous software packages offer a chat function; it provides an avenue for interaction between participants and trainer. Chat dialogues can often be saved for later reference. Computer-Based Learning - An all-encompassing term used to describe any computer-delivered learning, including CD-ROM and the World Wide Web. Computer-Assisted Instruction- A term used commonly in education to describe instruction in which a computer is used as a learning tool. Desktop Learning - Any learning delivered by computer at the participant’s desk. Desktop Video Conferencing - A real-time conference using live pictures between two or more people who communicate via computer on a network. Discussion Board - An asynchronous feature that allows participants to post messages and replies to messages by topic. Discussion boards are different from chat in that they are not real-time. eLearning – A term used to describe electronically delivered learning methods such as CD-ROM, web- based learning, online assessments, web-based reinforcement tools, and online coaching. Evaluation – A test-like feature that enables a trainer to conduct pre- and post-session assessments and to monitor participants’ understanding of course material as it is being presented. Assessment results can be automatically tabulated and saved. 16 | P a g e
  • Extranet - A web site for existing customers rather than the general public. It can provide access to paid research, current inventories, internal databases, and virtually any other information that is published for a limited audience. An extranet uses the public Internet as its transmission system but requires passwords to gain access. Firewall - A set of software programs that keep a network secure. Firewalls are widely used to give users access to the Internet in a secure fashion as well as to separate a company's public web server from its internal network. They are also used to keep internal network segments secure—for example, a research or accounting subnet that might be vulnerable to snooping from within. HTML - The authoring language used to create documents that can be viewed via the World Wide Web. Hyperlinks - An element in an electronic document that can link to another place either within the same document or in a different document. Typically the user clicks the hyperlink to follow the link. ISP (Internet Service Provider) - an organization that provides access to the Internet. Examples include America Online and Earthlink . For a fee, a web site can be created and maintained on the ISP's server, allowing a smaller organization to have a presence on the web with its own domain name. Internet-Based Training - Training that can be conducted over the Internet. Usually this is done with the World Wide Web, but e-mail correspondence courses and file transfers also fall into this category. Intranet - An in-house web site that serves the employees of an organization. Although intranet pages may link to the Internet, an intranet is not a site accessed by the general public. Intranets use the same communications protocols and hypertext links as the web and thus provide a standard way of distributing information internally and extending the application worldwide at the same time. Intranet-Based Training - Training based upon a company’s internal network. Web browsers are used to access company’s pages. The primary characteristic is that content is accessible only within the company’s internal network. Learning Technologies – Any tool or technology that facilitates learning. This includes classroom, correspondence, books, audiotapes, teleconferencing, interactive television, CD-ROM, and the World Wide Web. Online Learning - An all-encompassing term that refers to any learning done with a computer over a network, including a company’s intranet, the company’s local area network (LAN), and the Internet. Pacing/Comprehension – A feature in synchronous software programs that allows participants to continually appraise the trainer on the pace and clarity of the delivery. Plug-in - Software typically downloaded from the web that enables the user to read, hear, or view something. Examples of plug-ins include Adobe Acrobat Reader to view documents, RealPlayer Audio to listen to sound or music, and Flash to view animation and graphics and listen to audio. Portal - A web "supersite" that provides a variety of services, including web searching, news, white and yellow pages directories, free e-mail, discussion groups, online shopping, and links to other sites. Web portals are the web equivalent of original online services such as CompuServe and AOL. Although the term was initially used to refer to general-purpose sites, it is increasingly being used to refer to market sites that offer the same services, but only to a particular industry, such as banking, insurance, or computers. Producer – A person who assists the trainer during live synchronous events by acting as an “extra set of hands.” In addition to training responsibilities, the producer handles technical support so that the facilitator can focus on instruction. The producer does not need to be in the same physical location as the trainer. Record/Playback - Feature that allows the trainer and participant to record synchronous events, play them back later, and edit them into asynchronous sessions. This feature benefits individuals who miss sessions and allows quick creation of asynchronous learning content. Self-Paced Learning - Learning that is taken at a time, pace, and place that are chosen by the participant. Generally, there is no interaction (synchronous or asynchronous) with a trainer. Survey/Poll - A quick way to check the pulse of the class. Questions can be true-false, multiple-choice, or other formats. 17 | P a g e
  • Synchronous Learning - This term refers to instruction that is led by a facilitator in real time. Examples of synchronous interactions include traditional trainer-led classrooms, conference calls, instant-messengers, video conferences, whiteboard sessions, and synchronous online classrooms/classroom software. Synchronous Web Browsing - Element that allows trainers or participants to bring the class to a specific Internet or intranet site. A variation of the feature allows the use of browsers to run short, self-paced exercises on the Internet or intranet as part of a synchronous session. VoIP – Technically, this is “Voice delivered over the Internet Protocol. This means sending voice information in digital form using the Internet. Web Streaming - Live playback of audio or video files on the web. Usually involves a plug-in or applications program to execute the media file. Whiteboard - An application used in synchronous interactive web conferencing that allows documents and content materials to be posted on the screen for all participants to see. The participants see the information being changed on their screens in real time. Whiteboards work well for visual symbols, charts, and graphs. -- End Participant Guide -- 18 | P a g e