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Adolescent Health- Board of Health April 2012
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Adolescent Health- Board of Health April 2012

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In 2011, the Chicago Department of Public Health created an Office of Adolescent & School Health. Here's an update presented to the Chicago Board of Health

In 2011, the Chicago Department of Public Health created an Office of Adolescent & School Health. Here's an update presented to the Chicago Board of Health

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  • Note targets found throughout agenda
  • Sherry—can you replicate this graph and add 2009 data?? - 31.8/1000 birthrate for women under 20; however the high rate communities are as high as 54.7/100072% of all teen births occur in just 34 communitiesAccording to the 2009 Youth Risk Behavior Survey:44.9% of 9th graders report having sex (YRBS 09)34.9% did not use a condom during last sexual intercourse (YRBS 09)
  • 35 % of all GC cases are in adolescents 13-19
  • 37% of all cases of CT are in adolescents 13-19 and 70% in 13-24
  • CPS 9th Grade Student Population Profile:85% Free and Reduced Lunch enrolled76% Medicaid enrolled81% medical compliance
  • Tiffany—the graph says 40 schools but actually 44 are listed and on the evaluation list that Chapin Hall handed out today only 43 schools were listed. PLUS the evaluation doesn’t list total number of schools participating which would be the alternative schools. Jaime- This was the original slide from the TPPI Information session. Only the regular H.S. were randomized, the alternative schools were automatic treatment. I adjusted the slide to reflect this as well at the attrition.
  • 2009-2012/4 school participated/59.2% tested/8.12% infected2010-2011/12 schools participated/68.60 tested/13.20% infected2011-2012/17 schools participated so far/65.30 tested/10.54% infected

Adolescent Health- Board of Health April 2012 Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Chicago Department of Public Health Healthy Chicago: Focus on Adolescent Health Chicago Board of Health April 18, 2012 Chicago Department of Public Health @ChiPublicHealth on Rahm Emanuel Bechara Choucair, MD Mayor Commissioner
  • 2. Overview• Healthy Chicago Adolescent Goal and Targets• Chicago Adolescent Data• Special Initiatives – Teen Pregnancy Prevention – STI Education, Screening and Treatment Initiative
  • 3. Adolescent Health GoalImprove health, safety, and well-being ofadolescents.
  • 4. 2020 Adolescent Health Targets• Reduce by 10% – Teen birth rate – Chlamydia among youth – Teen dating violence• Increase the percent of adolescents ages 13-17 receiving 3 doses of HPV vaccination from 15.6% to 60%.• Reduce smoking prevalence among youth to 11.4%.• Reduce school bullying of students from 11.1%-9%• Decrease the percent of students missing school due to safety concerns from 15.1% to 9%.
  • 5. CHICAGO ADOLESCENT HEALTH DATA
  • 6. Birth Rate Among 10-19 Year Olds (Per 1000) 60 Chicago, 1999-2009 51.3 50 44.2 41.2 40 37.3 35.7 34.6 33.8 34.3 33.1 32.2 31.8 30 2020 Target: 29 20 10 0 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009Source: Vital Records, Illinois Department of Public Health
  • 7. Trends in Gonorrhea Cases, 13-19 years old 40 35 30 25Percentage 20 15 10 5 0 2007 2008 2009 2010 YearCDPH Data: 2011 HIV/STI Surveillance Report
  • 8. Trends in Chlamydia Cases, 13-19 years old 40 35 30 25 Percentage 20 15 10 5 0 2007 2008 2009 2010 YearSTI: CDPH Data: 2011 HIV/STI Surveillance Report
  • 9. Trends in Primary and Secondary Syphilis Cases, 13-19 years old 8 7 6 5 Percentage 4 3 2 1 0 2007 2008 2009 2010 YearSTI: CDPH Data: 2011 HIV/STI Surveillance Report
  • 10. Estimated Vaccination Coverage With ≥ 3 doses HPV4 Among Female Adolescents Aged 13-17 Years 100% 80% 60% 40% 20% 0% 2008 2009 2010 2011 Chicago IL USSource: National Immunization Survey
  • 11. Seriously Considered Attempting Suicide (during the 12 months before the survey) 18 16 14 12 10 8 6 4 2 0 Sex: Total Sex: Female Sex: Male 2007 2009Chicago, IL, High School CDC Youth Risk Behavior Survey
  • 12. • Suicide, YRBSS Survey, 2007, 2009: 9th – 12th Grades
  • 13. Youth Drug Arrests 16000 14000 12000 10000 8000 6000 4000 2000 0 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Drug Arrest 10-19 Durg Arrest 20-24Source: Chicago Police Data
  • 14. Youth Violent Crime45004000350030002500200015001000 500 0 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Violent Crime 10-19 Violent Crime 20-24Source: Chicago Police Data
  • 15. Teen Pregnancy Prevention Initiative Tiffany V. Seay, MS CPS Program ManagerTeen Pregnancy Prevention Initiative
  • 16. Teen Pregnancy Prevention Grant Overview $19.7M for 5 years 1100 applicants received by Office of Adolescent Health 94 awards 10 awards in category D (Rigorous Evaluation Status) 4 of 94 awards were to school districts
  • 17. Collaborating Partners• Chicago Public Schools - Office of Pathways to College and Careers - Child & Family Benefits Unit -Teaching and Learning – Service Learning Unit• Chicago Department of Public Health (CDPH)• Illinois Caucus for Adolescent Health (ICAH)• Planned Parenthood of Illinois (PPIL)• Chapin Hall• Wyman Center• SGA Youth and Family Services• WES Healthcare Systems
  • 18. Program MissionThe Chicago Teen Pregnancy Prevention Initiative will reduce teen pregnancy by improving Chicago youth’s life skills, healthy behaviors, and community engagement.
  • 19. Chicago Initiative Overview• Adolescent Health Access Committee• Children and Family Benefits Unit Enrollment Agent • Youth Advisory• CPS Service Committee Learning • Peer Health Specialist Ambassadors• Parent • Social Media Engagement Campaign Specialist • Community• TOP Facilitators Service Learning• Youth Engagement Teen Outreach • Condom Availability Specialist Program Program• Community Engagement Chicago High Schools Specialist Leadership Committee• Training (Chicago Public Schools, Chicago Department of Public Health, Illinois Specialists Caucus for Adolescent Health, Planned Parenthood of Illinois, WES Healthcare Systems, SGA Youth anf Family Services and Chapin Hall)
  • 20. Target Population• 34 Chicago communities• 40 High Schools• 9th grade students• 4 Alternative High Schools-- all students• 9000 students annuallyWHY 9th grade?• 15 year old birth rate is 15.9/1000 while the 16 year old birth rate is 40/1000
  • 21. Chicago’s ModelTreatment Schools (n=20) Control Schools (n=20)Wyman Center’s Teen Outreach $2000.00 incentive for studyProgram related efforts Condom Availability Program (school-based) Peer Health Ambassadors (school-based) Youth Engagement Specialist (school-based) Children and Family Benefit Enrollment Agent (Initiative-wide) Teen Health Hotline (city-wide) Youth Advisory Committee (city-wide) Social Media Campaign (city-wide)
  • 22. ELEMENTS OF TOP™
  • 23. TOP™ CURRICULUMCOMPONENTS
  • 24. Why Teen Outreach Program? • Teen Outreach Program Outcomes: – 60% reduced risk of course failure – 52% reduced risk of suspension – 53% reduced risk of teen pregnancy – 60% reduced risk of school dropout (observed)
  • 25. Why Teen Outreach Program?• Evidenced-based youth development curriculum• School-based prevention by: – Strengthening resiliency – Promoting self efficacy – Healthy behaviors – Life skills – Sense of purpose
  • 26. RTI & WELL-BEINGPOSITIVE WELL-BEING IN THE EDUCATION SYSTEM RESPONSE TO INTERVENTION integrates assessment and intervention within a multi-level prevention system to maximize student achievement and to reduce behavior problems. With RTI, schools identify student progress, provide evidence- based interventions and adjust the intensity and nature of those interventions depending on a student’s responsiveness, and identify students with learning disabilities or other disabilities.
  • 27. Evaluation: Chapin Hall In August 2011, random assignment of forty-four (44) interested and eligible high schools in Chicago communities with the highest teen birth rates 22 21 Treatment high Control high schools receive schools do not TOP receive TOP Plus four (4) Alternative Schools All schools participate in data collection activities
  • 28. Implementing TOP• Minimum twenty-five (25) sessions over nine (9) month period• Consistent class period with the same group of youth• 1 Facilitator:25 Student Ratio• Twenty (20) hours of Community Service Learning (CSL) opportunities• Eighty (80%) percent of sessions must include the TOP curriculum or TOP-Related Activities
  • 29. CDPH STI Education and Screening Initiative
  • 30. Program Overview• Program piloted in 2008 due to rise in STI’s among adolescents• Gonorrhea and Chlamydia education and screening in Chicago Public Schools• Treatment provided by School Health Centers, CDPH STI clinics and other community health clinics
  • 31. CDPH/CPS STI Project Results Gonorrhea Chlamydia DualSchool Year Schools Educated Tested Positive Positive Infection Treated 357 2 29 22009-2010 4 603 100% (59.2%) (.5%) (8.1%) (.5%) 2,188 27 228 342010-2011 12 3,189 96.80% (68%) (1.2%) (10.4%) (1.5%) 4,259 27 272 262011-2012 21 6,991 69%* (61%) (.63%) (6.4%) (.61%)2011-2012 5,625 30 7500 -- -- -- 100%(Goal) 75%*3 schools testing results are pending and 4 schools tx results pendingData complete through March 2012
  • 32. Number of youth educated, cumulative7,0006,000 5,6305,000 4,6024,0003,000 2,228 2,2272,0001,000 0 CPS CCJTDC IYC-C Target
  • 33. Percent of students testing positive for gonorrhea, cumulative3.0% 63/21882.5%2.0%1.5% 30/27941.0% 2/272 2/357 4/620 2/3720.5%0.0% College CPS 2010 Chicago Prevalence
  • 34. Percent of students testing positive for chlamydia, cumulative14% 260/218812%10% 31/357 220/29748% 18/272 36/6206% 20/3724%2%0% College CPS 2010 Chicago Prevalence
  • 35. Future of STI Project• Develop Public/Private partnerships to build capacity and sustainability• Collaborative work with School Health Centers to deploy this model annually
  • 36. www.Cityofchicago.org/HealthHealthyChicago@cityofchicago.orgFacebook.com/ChicagoPublicHealth@ChiPublicHealthhttp://gplus.to/ChiPublicHealth(312) 747-9884