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Chew Valley School Options Booklet 2014
 

Chew Valley School Options Booklet 2014

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Options booklet for KS4 courses at Chew Valley School starting in September 2014

Options booklet for KS4 courses at Chew Valley School starting in September 2014

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    Chew Valley School Options Booklet 2014 Chew Valley School Options Booklet 2014 Document Transcript

    • INTRODUCTION CONTENTS Page 2 3 Introduction What is this booklet about? Upper School Courses 2014-2016 Curriculum Area Course Title Board Qualification English Language English Literature Mathematics Science AQA AQA EDECXEL AQA OCR ICT Physical Education OCR JSL GCSE GCSE GCSE GCSE (up to 3 x GCSEs) Cambridge Nationals Award Level 1/2 Level 2 Award for iMedia Level 1 Award in Sports Leadership Core Curriculum Personal, Social, and Health Education Philosophy & Ethics Work Experience Art Business Studies Child Development & Care Options Courses Construction Dance Design and Technology:  Food Technology  Product Design  Systems & Control  Textiles Drama French Geography German History ICT Computing Page 6 7 8 9 9 11 12 N/A 13 AQA Short Course GCSE N/A 14 15 OCR OCR GCSE Cambridge Nationals Award Level 2 GCSE and BTEC Level 2 Extended Certificate BTEC Level 1 GCSE 16 OCR / EDEXCEL EDEXCEL AQA AQA AQA AQA AQA EDEXCEL AQA OCR AQA OCR EDEXCEL OCR Personal Development ASDAN Media Studies Music Physical Education AQA OCR OCR Sport OCR Religious Studies Spanish AQA AQA GCSE GCSE GCSE GCSE GCSE GCSE GCSE GCSE GCSE GCSE GCSE Certificate/Award in Personal Development GCSE GCSE GCSE Cambridge Nationals Certificate Level 2 GCSE GCSE 17 18 19 2020 21 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 Options Pattern and Instructions – Options should be completed online in the Insight Parent Portal by Wednesday 22nd January 2014. 1
    • INTRODUCTION WHAT IS THIS BOOKLET ABOUT? This Booklet has been prepared to help you to choose the best combination of subjects for you to study in Years 10 and 11. The choices you make will set you on the path leading to your future career, so it is important that they are the right ones for YOU. Your teachers will be available to help you: listen to them and your parents and then make your decision on the basis of this advice, what you are good at and what you enjoy studying. You will need to refer to the Options Pattern at the back of the booklet. Advice about how to complete options online in the Insight Parent Portal will be given to students in school and to parents at the Options Evening on January 8th. WHO ELSE CAN HELP? Your Form Tutor: Your tutor knows you very well and will help and advise you on a oneto-one basis. They will be there to guide you through the whole Options process. Careers Staff: Mr Hammett works with advisors who offer careers advice to students. This is done through meetings, and individual interviews which are arranged by Mr Hammett. Do’s and Don’ts Do’s: Do Do Do choose subjects YOU want to do. You are the person who has to do the work. choose subjects that you are good at. talk to your tutor, your teachers and your parents and get their advice. They want to help you. Don’ts: Don’t simply choose what your friend has chosen. There is no guarantee you will be in the same class. Don’t choose a subject because you like the teacher. They might not teach you next year. Don’t choose something new just for a change. Find out about it first. Don’t choose before reading everything in this booklet and listening to advice. IT IS IMPORTANT THAT YOU GET IT RIGHT. IT IS NOT USUALLY POSSIBLE TO SWAP COURSES ONCE YOU HAVE STARTED AND FINALLY……… This is a really exciting time for you. You are moving on to the next phase of your school career. There are so many wonderful opportunities ahead, both within the courses you follow and in the fantastic range of activities available to you outside the classroom. Challenge yourself – you will be surprised at what you can achieve! 2
    • INTRODUCTION UPPER SCHOOL COURSES 2014–2016 THE KEY STAGE 4 CURRICULUM The curriculum is a combination of subjects you have to study (The Core Curriculum) and subjects you can choose to study (Optional). The Core Curriculum is: English & English Literature Maths Science ICT PE Personal, Social, and Health Education (PSHE) Philosophy and Ethics (RE) These subjects develop the skills that are essential for all careers and for helping you to cope in the modern world. The options are set out in two pathways. Not every subject is available in each pathway. What are the different qualifications on offer? GCSEs  GCSEs cater for students of almost all abilities. They are graded from A*-G.  Short Course GCSEs are also graded from A*-G. They are equivalent to half a full course GCSE. We offer a Short Course in RE as part of our core curriculum. Applied Qualifications Applied qualifications (sometimes called “vocational” qualifications) offer an alternative to GCSE. They have a greater proportion of continuous assessment than GCSEs, although they do have an examined element.  BTEC qualifications are work-related programmes of study designed to accommodate the needs of employers in skills-based industries. We offer a Level 1 BTEC in Construction.  Cambridge Nationals are vocationally-related qualifications that take an engaging, practical and inspiring approach to learning and assessment. We offer Level 2 Cambridge Nationals in Sport Science and Sport Studies as part of a two-year Sport course.  iMedia qualifications are designed to develop skills in the use of ICT applications for dynamic media such as digital graphics, web design, video/sound, and interactive concepts. We offer a Level 2 award in iMedia as part of our core curriculum, with an option to study for a Level 2 certificate. 3
    • INTRODUCTION The English Baccalaureate The English Baccalaureate is a certificate awarded to any student achieving A*-C in five separate elements: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. English Language Two Sciences (either separate sciences, or core and additional science) Mathematics History or Geography A Modern Foreign Language (French, German or Spanish) The subjects included in the English Baccalaureate are designed to ensure that all students have the opportunity to study a broad core of subjects, ensuring that doors are not closed off to you in terms of future progression. Subjects which qualify for the English Baccalaureate are flagged throughout this booklet. The Academic Pathway is structured to ensure that students who take this route automatically qualify for the English Baccalaureate. Academic or Applied Pathway? The options are organised into two pathways to help you choose your first two options. The Academic pathway provides a foundation in facilitating subjects at GCSE which is a good preparation for study at A-Level and University. It is constructed to ensure that you are eligible to qualify for the English Baccalaureate. The Applied pathway provides a foundation in practical subjects which are awarded with an emphasis on continuous assessment. These subjects offer an alternative to GCSEs. No matter which pathway you choose, options three and four consist of a free choice including some GCSE and some applied subjects. You should also choose a reserve option in case the school is unable to provide the first combination of subjects you have chosen. Options Nomination The majority of our options are a free choice. However, some options will be decided by your teachers based on your achievement in Years 7-9. These include:    Science: your science set is decided by your achievement in Science assessments throughout Key Stage 3. The majority of students study for two GCSEs in Core and Additional Science. The highest achieving students follow a triple science course studying for separate GCSEs in Biology, Physics and Chemistry. Some sets will follow Cambridge National courses in Science. For more details see our Science pages beginning on page 9. BTEC Construction: this is a Level 1 course equivalent to GCSE grades D-G. Students are nominated for this course based on their suitability by Learning Support, Design and Technology, and pastoral staff. Personal Development: students are nominated for this course based on special educational or learning needs. 4
    • INTRODUCTION YOUR KEY STAGE 4 COURSE NEXT YEAR The standard timetable will be made up in the following way: SUBJECT English & English Literature Maths Core Science Physical Education Philosophy and Ethics Core ICT PSHE Additional Science Option A Option B Option C Option D COMPULSORY OR OPTIONAL Compulsory Compulsory Compulsory Compulsory Compulsory Compulsory Compulsory PERIODS PER FORTNIGHT 8 7 6 4 2 2 1 Compulsory Choice to be made now Choice to be made now Choice to be made now Choice to be made now Total Lessons: 6 6 6 6 6 60 Course Viability We will try to run every course on offer in this booklet. However, in some rare instances courses may not recruit enough students to create a viable option group. If this happens you may be asked to opt again. In this case Mr Hildrew or Miss Hellier will meet with you to offer advice and help you to make a suitable alternative choice. What to do next     The subjects available next year are arranged in alphabetical order. Read the details of each course carefully. Seek advice and then make your decisions. Complete your options online in the Insight Parent Portal. See the Instructions for details of how to do this. Please note you will need a parental username and password to complete your options. If at any stage a student or parent would like to meet with Mr Hildrew, Deputy Head, or Miss Hellier, Head of Year 9, please contact Mrs Taylor in the Home School Welfare Office and she will set up a meeting. Her telephone number is 01275 334212, or you can email htaylor@chewvalleyschool.co.uk. 5
    • CORE CURRICULUM GCSE ENGLISH LANGUAGE English Baccalaureate Part 1 What do you study?  A course leading to a GCSE in English Language.  A range of writing skills for fiction and non-fiction forms and purposes.  Reading skills linked to a range of non-fiction texts.  Research and investigation skills linked to the study of spoken language. Why Study English?  To develop crucial communication skills as a speaker and writer.  To develop your reading skills, helping you not only to read more difficult texts but also to notice inference, implication and to make deductions about what you read.  To develop skills in analysing and thinking.  To develop your ability to form opinions about the world and to consider ideas.  To learn about Literature and Media texts and what they show about the world around you. GCSE English is a vital qualification for most future jobs, 6th Form or further education, as evidence that you can read, write, speak, listen and think well! How is the course assessed? Coursework will be assessed under Controlled Conditions (CCA) and will start as soon as you arrive in Year 10 and continue throughout the course at set times. You will also do an exam at the end of Year 11. Reading Writing Controlled Conditions Assessment 25% 15% Written Examination 30% 30% Exam (2 hours):  Section A: Reading: Higher Tier: answer 4 questions on non-fiction reading sources. Foundation Tier: answer 5 questions on non-fiction reading sources.  Section B: Writing: Two compulsory writing tasks – one shorter (16 marks) one longer task (24 marks) Controlled Assessment: Four written pieces of work, as follows:  An Extended Reading Task (15%)  Two pieces of Creative Writing (15%)  A Spoken Language Study (10%) There will be a separate assessment of your speaking and listening skills reported with your examination results. Who is responsible for the course? Mr G James – Head of English 6
    • CORE CURRICULUM GCSE ENGLISH LITERATURE What do you study?    A course leading to a GCSE in English Literature. A modern prose or drama text, a Shakespeare play, material from the English Literary Heritage and an Anthology of Poetry. There are some links with the English Language GCSE, and some of the texts studied can result in work that contributes to the Extended Reading CCA. Why study English Literature?      It develops your ability to respond to others’ ideas and ways of seeing the world. It develops further your ability to communicate effectively and to think independently. To do well you need to analyse well and develop lively and interesting essays. It is even more evidence of good reading and writing skills to add to your English GCSE. It leads directly to English Literature or Language and Literature at A level. The analytical, expressive and argumentative skills that you will develop will be useful for your future career and further study. How is the course assessed?   Two written exams in June of Year 11. One written controlled assessment. One CCA piece on Shakespeare and the Literary Heritage Exam: Study of poetry Exam: Study of a modern novel or drama text Controlled Assessment 25% Written Examination - - 35% 40% Exams:  Poetry Across Time (1 hour 15 minutes) Section A – Comparison of two poems from the Anthology Section B – Response to an unseen poem.  Exploring Modern Texts (1 hour 30 minutes) Section A – response to modern prose or drama text studied Section B – exploring culture, based upon a specific extract from text studied Controlled Assessment:  A comparison/exploration of links between a Shakespeare play and a text from the English Literary Heritage (this could be poetry, prose or drama). Who is responsible for the course? Mr G James – Head of English 7
    • CORE CURRICULUM GCSE MATHEMATICS English Baccalaureate Part 2 What do you study? You will build on and widen your knowledge in the four main areas: Algebra, Number, Data Handling and Shape & Space. You will continue to develop skills in problem solving and applying your knowledge to new situations. The new GCSE syllabus includes questions on what is called Functional Maths, which is maths in context, and questions that test your ability to solve problems. The questions no longer lead you through the problem. Now you will have to choose an appropriate method and then set out your own strategy for solving the problem. There will be marks awarded for the quality of your written communication in maths. Why study Maths?       It develops important skills learnt since primary school It builds on your logic and problem solving skills It is a language that can be used to describe the world around us. It is very valuable as a supporting subject to other courses at GCSE level and beyond. A good maths GCSE is crucial for most jobs and entry to further education There is presently a national shortage of mathematically trained students, therefore having a good maths GCSE makes you very employable. How is the course assessed? At the end of Year 9, test marks, teacher assessment levels and your general performance throughout Year 9 are considered. You are then allocated to a teaching group, according to your ability. In this group, you will follow an appropriate programme of work for the tier of entry of your group. There are two tiers of entry for Mathematics and the grade you can achieve will depend on which tier you are entered for: Higher tier Foundation tier - A*, A, B, C, D (or ungraded) C, D, E, F, G (or ungraded) You will follow a linear course during the two years and you will be assessed over two written exams at the end of the course. There is no coursework however you will be given homework on a weekly basis. This is an important aspect of the course as it allows you to consolidate learning that has taken place in class, as well as allowing your teacher to monitor your understanding. Who is responsible for the course? Mrs K Falconer/Mr J Chatfield (KS4 Co-ordinator) and Miss C Hall (Head of Mathematics). 8
    • CORE CURRICULUM GCSE SCIENCE English Baccalaureate Part 3 What do you study? The Science course which draws together the essential skills of Biology, Chemistry, Physics and Environmental Science, is all about how our universe works. It looks at many different aspects including:  How living things work, reproduce and affect each other and the natural environment.  How we can use and exploit the world’s natural resources.  How we can develop alternatives to the fast-diminishing resource of the planet and attempt to safeguard our future.  How we can apply technologies, both old and new, to improve our daily lives.  Where possible, we try to use experiments and demonstrations to cover the ideas. Why study Science?     The course lets you develop your scientific skills further. The nation as a whole needs to have a good grasp of scientific ideas so that we can make sensible choices about our future. This course provides a lot of the information necessary to allow you to contribute. The triple or double GCSE options are the essential qualifications needed if you plan to take any science (including Environmental Science, Geology, and Psychology) further. A huge number of career paths need science qualifications, including engineering and all medical careers. How is the course assessed? The ‘Core Science’ GCSE is assessed in three exams at the end of Y10. , You will also complete a piece of controlled conditions assessment. ‘Additional Science’ GCSE is assessed similarly in Year 11. The ‘Double Science’ option prepares you fully for Science A-levels. Two groups will be selected to take a ‘Triple Science’ option. You will be invited to take part if you achieve high results in both the Year 9 topic tests and the end of year exam. The course will involve you studying separate courses in Biology, Chemistry and Physics (3 GCSEs) in the time allocated to Double Science. This will be examined at the end of Y11. This course will suit students who work at a faster pace and are comfortable with the more difficult concepts in Science. The course will prepare you well for Science A-levels. Who is responsible for the course? Mr J Walford – Head of Science 9
    • CORE CURRICULUM Cambridge National Science What do you study?   Cambridge National Science (Year 10) o Science In Everyday Life (coursework module): worth 50% of the course and assessed using nine assignments completed in class and for homework o Scientists and Their Ideas (examined module): worth 25% and examined in January of Year 10 with a re-sit opportunity in June of Year 10. o Science Research (coursework module): worth 25%; a research project completed in class and at home Cambridge National Science in the Workplace (Year 11): o How Scientists Use Analytical Techniques (coursework module); worth 25% of the course and assessed using a laboratory notebook. o How Scientific Data is Used (examined module); worth 25% of the course and examined in January of Year 11. o An optional unit either; Environmental Science, Fitness and Health or Production (coursework module); worth 50% and assessed as a portfolio of tasks completed in class and at home. Why study Cambridge National Science?      The course lets you develop your scientific skills further. The nation as a whole needs to have a good grasp of scientific ideas so that we can make sensible choices about our future. This course provides a lot of the information necessary to allow you to contribute. A huge number of career paths need science qualifications, including engineering and all medical careers. The higher proportion of coursework within the Cambridge National course offers the best route to success in Science for some students. The course content is the same as the GCSE Core Science but the assessment is different. Some students will be selected to follow a ‘Single Science’ option where only the Cambridge National Science qualification is followed over two years. These students will study for Personal and Social Development (see page 32) for half of their Science lessons How is the course assessed?     The course is worth one GCSE in each year and is available at Level 1 (equivalent to GCSE grades D-F) and Level 2 (equivalent to GCSE grades A*-C). It is expected that all students taking Cambridge National Science will aim for a Level 2 qualification 75% of the qualification is awarded from the two coursework modules 25% of the qualification is awarded from the exam, which will be taken in January of Year 10 Who is responsible for the course? Mr J Walford – Head of Science 10
    • CORE CURRICULUM Core ICT (Level 2 Award in Creative iMedia) What do you study? Unit 212 – Creating a Digital Animation Review, Plan, Design and Create an Animation using Adobe Flash Professional Unit 210 – Interactive Multimedia Concepts Creating a Touch Screen Interactive Presentation for use on a Tablet PC Essential and Emerging ICT Looking at the most important and necessary skills for Office ICT, as well as the future of technology Why Study ICT?:  Practical and evidence based course with an emphasis on office and creative skills  Progress into ICT and other practical Level 3 courses or A Level Computing  Feedback is given via an online assessment database  All resources are accessible from home at any time How is the course assessed? Units are graded either Pass or Fail by internal assessment and external moderation. This course is the equivalent of a half-GCSE at Grade B. Who is responsible for the course? Mr J Webber – Head of ICT 11
    • CORE CURRICULUM CORE PE During your Core PE lessons in Key Stage 4 we hope that you will complete your vocational qualification that you began in Year 9. This is called the Level 1 Award in Sports Leadership, known as JSL for short. You will continue to cover the pattern of activities that you have opted for. The criteria for a pass include a 95% participation rate so you must bring your kit to all lessons. You will be given a logbook to record your leadership experiences in. This could be anything from leading a warm up in your core PE lesson to organising a sporting festival for 150 Year 2 pupils. Your logbook provides the evidence to award your certificate at the end of the course. During lessons you will be developing your practical skills but also learning leadership skills that will help you in all aspects of your future, for example organisation, communication, fair play, officiating and health and fitness. You will get the opportunity to practice these skills through a variety of different activities. In Year 11 you will have the opportunity to choose a variety of activities that will encourage you to follow a healthy, active lifestyle. We will encourage you to complete sport specific leadership and officiating qualifications but these will be optional. Who is responsible for the course? Miss J Hibbert – Head of Physical Education 12
    • CORE CURRICULUM PERSONAL, SOCIAL, AND HEALTH EDUCATION What is the course about? All students will follow a programme in Personal, Social and Health Education. This will involve learning about a range of issues that are important and relevant to the lives of all young people, looking at how society affects you, and your role and responsibilities. The programme will include:      Sex and Relationships Education Drug Awareness Education An Introduction to Work Experience and Careers Risk awareness Physical and emotional wellbeing PSHE will be timetabled once a fortnight and lessons will be run by one of a specialist team. Experts may be invited in to talk to your group about particular issues or to run workshops. There will be opportunities for you to work in a variety of ways including pair work, group discussion, student presentations and to join larger groups on topical projects. Citizenship is also an important part in the school curriculum and you will have an opportunity to take part in a range of activities including community service, charity fundraising, representation on the school and Year Council and initiatives such as recycling and healthy eating. Why do we study PSHE? This programme is devised to give you information about a wide range of issues but also to help develop your confidence, your ability to share your views and opinions and to tolerate and support those of your peers. How is this subject assessed? There are no exams in PSHE, but evidence of your work and involvement will be recorded in your monitoring and assessment profile. Who is responsible for the course? Mrs L. Pope – Head of PSHRE. 13
    • CORE CURRICULUM SHORT COURSE GCSE PHILOSOPHY AND ETHICS What is the course about? The course covers four areas of ethical concern:     Animal Rights including the relative value of animals and the ways we use them Prejudice including the origins and effects of prejudice and discrimination Early life including the sanctity of life, quality of life and abortion War and Peace including the criteria for a just war and pacifism Students will consider their own views on these issues and will consider a range of different viewpoints from the Christian, Hindu and Muslim traditions. Why do we study Philosophy and Ethics? The Philosophy and Ethics course replaces Philosophy and Belief (studied in years 7-9). Philosophy and Ethics addresses issues of faith and fulfils our legal obligation to teach Religious Education. In addition to this it provides young adults with a forum to face some deep and difficult questions about our lives and behaviour and the opportunity to develop critical thinking and analytical skills which will enhance their learning experience across the curriculum and allow them to communicate their ideas in a more sophisticated way. It will enable students to:  develop their interest in, and enthusiasm for, a study of religion and its relation to the wider world;  develop their knowledge, skills and understanding of religion by exploring the significance, impact of beliefs, teachings, sources, practices, ways of life and forms of expressing meaning;  express their personal responses and informed insights on fundamental questions about identity, belonging, meaning, purpose, truth, values and commitment. How is this subject assessed? Philosophy and Ethics is examined as a Short Course GCSE. All students will do a one hour and 30 minute exam at the end of Year 11. Who is responsible for the course? Mrs L Pope, Head of PSHRE 14
    • CORE CURRICULUM WORK EXPERIENCE CAREERS AND WORK EXPERIENCE During Year 9 you carried out a career search using the KUDOS computer programme, and will take part in a careers fair at school. This should give you some ideas about future careers which may interest you. In Year 10 you will take part in a week’s Work Experience during June 2015. You will be given guidance about how to apply using an approved website which offers placements which have been checked for Health and Safety, and lots of advice about how to apply. In Year 11 you will be given guidance about post 16 options, including careers talks and individual interviews. If you or your parents have any concerns about careers or the programme we offer, please contact Mr Hammett. Who is responsible for careers and work experience? Mr N Hammett 15
    • OPTION SUBJECTS GCSE - ART What do you study? This is a two-year GCSE course. During these two years, some of the most important skills you will be expected to develop are:    drawing from observation, using a variety of materials and techniques. research into different styles of art and artists. independent study in class and at home. You will study and practise a broad range of skills, techniques, themes and artists. Although the majority of your controlled conditions assessment will be developed in your sketchbooks, you will also be expected to produce a number of quality pieces of ‘finished’ artwork in two and three-dimensions, which will make up your portfolio. Why study Art? Art is a creative subject that promotes and encourages independent learning, self discipline and visual expression. Students achieving grades A* - C could go onto study Art (Fine Art), Textiles or Photography at AS/A2 level. How is it assessed? There are four Assessment Objectives that carry equal weighting. Your coursework portfolio, and your final set task (exam) will be marked under these headings:     Develop (ideas and investigations informed by research into Art and Artists) – 25% Experiment (select and use materials, techniques and processes) – 25% Record (drawing and recording observations) – 25% Present (a personal and informed response (final pieces), connecting ideas, research and observations) – 25% 60% of your GCSE grade is based on the Coursework Portfolio. This is run under Controlled Assessment conditions over 15 school weeks. 40% of your GCSE grade is based on the OCR-set Task (exam). You will have a 10-hour practical (run over a number of days, under exam conditions) to present a personal response. All the preparation work for the set task is produced in the weeks beforehand, and counts towards your assessment. Who is responsible for the course? Ms S Bloxham – Head of Art 16
    • OPTION SUBJECTS CAMBRIDGE NATIONALS AWARD IN BUSINESS LEVEL 2 What do you study? Are you keen to learn the secrets of the SUCCESS of major brands such as Nike or CocaCola? Cambridge Nationals in Business looks behind the scenes at what is involved in running a successful business. You will examine all aspects of the business world and develop a wide knowledge of the challenges currently facing firms. You will also gain a good grasp of practical business communication skills using ICT in particular Cambridge Nationals are alternatives to GCSEs, taking a more practical approach to learning and assessment. Students will produce a portfolio of work which they will develop throughout the course and submit at the end of the second year.       Business Objectives Recruitment in Business (Year 10 assignment) Raising Finance The Business Environment and Marketing Types of Business Running your own Enterprise (Year 11 assignment) The course requires students to understand business activity from different perspectives, which includes the:      Interests of different stakeholders Need for sustainability Effects of business activity on the environment Increasing importance of ethics in decision making Globalisation of business activity. Why study Business Studies? Because:  you will develop communication, problem-solving, information technology and numeracy skills – all essential practical skills for future employment.  you will understand that business affects virtually every aspect of our lives,  the IT skills you develop –are vital in many careers.  the course will allow a natural progression to Advanced Business course post-16 How is the course assessed? Students will produce two timed assessments which will be marked in school and then externally moderated, and sit one external examination at the end of Year 10. Who is responsible for the course? Mr S Pearce - Head of Business Studies 17
    • OPTION SUBJECTS CHILD DEVELOPMENT AND CARE What do you study? This course includes a full GCSE in Child Development and BTEC Level 2 Extended Certificate in Health and Social Care to provide a balance between academic qualifications and vocational applied study. The two qualifications form a single course which takes up two option choices in the applied pathway. GCSE in Child Development Students will complete controlled assessment tasks on child development, including a detailed Child Study based on a 0-5 year old child. There will also be an examination on the principles of child development. BTEC Level 2 Extended Certificate in Health and Social Care For the BTEC students will study communication and individual needs in Health and Social Care as well as the impact of diet on health. An important part of the course is 60 hours compulsory work experience in two Health or Social Care settings, which includes the process of application, interview, placement and reflection on the placements. This is an extra week of work experience on top of the usual week in Year 10 (see page 15). This work experience will be carried out in school time and will be facilitated by the school, although students will be expected to be proactive in seeking and arranging their placements. Why study Child Development and Care? Health, Social and Child Care are key industries in our society. This course is designed to provide an excellent understanding of the issues and ideas within the field, as well as giving you a taste of what it would be like working in these areas. You will develop a range of skills which will help you to become an independent worker, valued by employers and higher education. The BTEC is a fully vocational course, providing a direct route into Level 3 apprenticeships or BTECs and employment, whilst the GCSE is an academic qualification and a good preparation for A-levels. How is the course assessed? GCSE in Child Care: 60% controlled assessment (Child Study and short tasks), 40% examination (The Principles of Child Development) BTEC in Health and Social Care: 100% coursework portfolio – four units in total Who is responsible for the course? Mr S Joyce – Head of Social Sciences 18
    • OPTION SUBJECTS BTEC LEVEL 1 CERTIFICATE/DIPLOMA IN CONSTRUCTION The BTEC in Construction aims to encourage you to develop the personal skills and qualities you need for work, learning and to help you achieve your full potential. BTEC qualifications are intended as practical “hands on” programmes with each one taught in the context of real jobs and careers in a chosen vocational sector. This course will give you a chance to explore the opportunities offered in that sector and to acquire appropriate vocational skills. What is the course structure? The Level 1 Certificate This course is made up of 4 units: What subjects will you study? All students take these core units:  Starting Work in Construction  Health & Safety and Welfare in Construction  Developing Carpentry Skills  Developing Joinery Skills All units are designated pass or fail. You may also have the opportunity to study the Level 1 Diploma in Construction. Level 1 Diploma This course is made up of a further 8 units, which, enable you to study particular construction skills. All students take these optional units:  Developing constructional drawing sills  Developing constructional painting skills  Developing constructional decorating skills  Developing electrical installation skills  Developing plumbing skills  Preparing for an interview  Interview skills All units are designated pass or fail. A BTEC Level 1 qualification in Construction can prepare you for employment in the Construction industry. You may also have the opportunity to go on to study the Level 2 in Construction (or similar) at college, or join an apprenticeship scheme. You may be able to combine a BTEC in Construction with another suitable Design and Technology subject. The BTEC in Construction is a double option, taking up two spaces in the Applied Pathway. This is not a free option; students are nominated to join this course by teaching staff. If you require any further information, please contact Mr Turner or Mr Britton. 19
    • OPTION SUBJECTS GCSE DANCE This course is both practical and theory based. What do you study?  You will study a number of different dance techniques and choreographers.  You will be taught how to create solo and group choreography pieces.  You will study professional dance works to develop your appreciation skills for your written paper.  Your course will include working with visiting dance artists and trips to the theatre.  You will be expected to take part in at least one extra-curricular dance activity if you take this option. You will also gain performance experience from taking part in the Chew Valley Dance Festival.  Students are expected to attend at least one extra-curricular dance activity to support their learning on this course How is the course assessed? Unit One – Critical Appreciation Written paper – 1 hour (50 marks/20%) Unit Two – Set Dance Practical exam – solo dance – 1-1 ½ minutes (30 marks/ 20%) Unit Three – Performance in a duo/group dance Controlled assessment – 3-3 ½ minutes (30 marks/20%) - Based upon a professional dance work Unit Four – Choreography (total for unit four 60 marks/40%) Task 1 – solo composition 1 – 1 ½ minutes (20 marks/ 15%) - Based upon a professional dance work Task 2 – Choreography – solo/duo/group 2 ½ - 3 minutes (40 marks/25%) Who is responsible for the course? Mrs R Loynton 20
    • OPTION SUBJECTS DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY Why study design and technology? You will follow a FULL course in Design and Technology. Through Design and Technology you will have lots of opportunity to solve practical problems. You will develop your communication skills through analysing and evaluating information and you will be involved in creating personal project work. During Years 7 to 9 you will have experienced a broad range of design and technology courses and now you have the opportunity to choose one FOCUS area to study to GCSE level. The FOCUS areas are:     Food Technology Product Design Systems and Control Textiles During the GCSE course, in whatever FOCUS area you choose, you will be planning ways to solve practical problems, using ICT to help you analyse information and to assist your creative thinking. GCSE FOOD TECHNOLOGY What do you study? During the course, you will follow a course in food safety and hygiene. You will be given the opportunity to sit the Environmental Health examination “Food Safety in the Catering Industry”. During Year 10 you will develop practical skills that you can implement in the controlled assessment task which you will undertake in Year 11. Through mini projects you will learn about food and nutrients and the specific needs of individuals, you will use the design process to develop new and interesting food products. Much of the learning will be through practical applications. Why study Food Technology? This course will give you a good insight into the sensible use of food, giving you useful skills to develop a range of healthy products. You will develop good organisation skills through practical tasks which will be invaluable throughout life. How is it assessed? The controlled assessment will account for 60% of the total GCSE mark. The written examination will make up the remaining 40% of the total GCSE mark. There will be a single tier of entry. Who is responsible for the course? Mrs J Russell 21
    • OPTION SUBJECTS GCSE PRODUCT DESIGN What do you study? Product Design is a practical subject which requires you to understand the material world around you. You will be designing, planning, producing and evaluating products. You will be taught basic design principles; you will develop design briefs to produce practical outcomes based on your own designs. You can develop your artistic skills through modelling both on the drawing board and through ICT. You will work with a range of materials, including paper/card, timber based materials, composites (GRP), metals, and plastics. You will be making projects such as pewter jewellery, Acrylic desk organisers, moving toys for children, storage units for personal items, educational toys etc. Throughout the course you will be looking at how products have evolved over time together with changes in manufacturing processes and technologies. You will be taught a range of artistic skills using line, tone, colour rendering. You will also be taught a range of hand skills, and the new technologies of both CAD (computer aided design) and CAM (computer aided manufacture) using the department’s range of CNC machinery including CNC routers, laser cutters and 3D printers. Why study Product Design? Product Design will develop your enquiring, creative and evaluation skills. It is a course for anybody who enjoys problem solving and derives satisfaction from producing practical pieces based on their own design. It is a good grounding for anyone interested in Designing and Making. It will help you understand how many of the products you encounter every day are designed and made and will provide an excellent foundation for anybody considering a future in a Design and Technology field such as: product design, jewellery design, industrial design furniture design, etc. You can continue your studies following an A Level course in Product Design. How is it assessed? The controlled assessment task will account for 60% of the total GCSE mark. The written examination will make up the remaining 40% of the total GCSE mark. There will be one tier of entry. Who is responsible for the course? Mr D Britton – Head of Design, Technology and Art 22
    • OPTION SUBJECTS GCSE SYSTEMS AND CONTROL What do you study? Systems and Control GCSE covers electronics, pneumatics (control of air powered cylinders) and mechanical control. You will learn basic electronic theory and will build a control circuit with sensors that can detect and respond to external changes. You will use industry standard software to design and test circuits that you can then print out and manufacture. You will also use programmable chips and learn to write and download programs directly to your own circuit boards. You will learn basic pneumatics theory and will pipe up and test a series of pneumatic circuits, ranging from the very simple to more complicated sequential circuits controlling several air powered cylinders. You will also learn to use many mechanisms and engineering components. These elements need to be combined together in your project work where you must solve a problem with a control system for a product that uses electronics and/or pneumatics. Why study Systems and Control? Systems and Control will provide a challenge for anybody who enjoys problem solving and derives satisfaction from getting things to work. It is a grounding in engineering and systems design and uses real industrial components, software and processes. It will help you understand how many of the products you encounter every day are designed and made and will provide an excellent foundation for anybody considering a future in a technical field (research, engineering, science, manufacturing, design etc.). How is it assessed? The controlled assessment task will account for 60% of the total GCSE mark. The written examination will make up the remaining 40% of the total GCSE mark. There will be one tier of entry. Who is responsible for the course? Mr M Turner 23
    • OPTION SUBJECTS GCSE TEXTILES What do you study? GCSE Textiles looks at the textile industry through Fashion & Fabrics. The course involves learning how to make fabric into 3D shapes through clothes or furnishings. Throughout the course you will look at how fabrics are made, ways to decorate and enhance fabric and how to manufacture textile items. In Year 10 you will:  Learn and develop both theory and practical skills that will be needed to produce a design folder and a practical piece for your controlled assessment in Year 11.  Find out about fibres and fabrics to help you make an informed choice when choosing materials for practical pieces and practice designing skills by hand and through ICT.  There will also be elements of looking at how textiles are produced in industry In year 11 you will focus on GCSE controlled assessment which involves researching, designing and making a Fashion or Furnishings practical piece. Why study Textiles? The course looks at fashion and design elements of the textile industry. You will develop your design and practical skills in an exciting way which can lead to a career in any areas of art or design. How is it assessed? The controlled assessment task will account for 60% of the GCSE mark. The written examination will make up the remaining 40% of the GCSE mark. Who is responsible for the course? Ms J Wilcox 24
    • OPTION SUBJECTS GCSE DRAMA What do you study? To begin with, you will learn a number of Drama techniques. You will then use these techniques to express your ideas and opinions about a range of issues. You will also study plays to see how playwrights express their ideas about themes or topics. Finally, you will have the choice of being involved in the performance of a play, either from an existing script, one that you create yourselves or as a lighting, sound, set or costume designer.. During the course you will:      Learn to work as part of a group Learn to use and understand a range of practical skills. Read and study plays from a performance perspective. Learn how lighting, sound, set & costume can enhance your work. Study how live theatre works effectively. Learn how to write effectively about the performances you see on the course. Why study Drama?  Drama allows you to work creatively with others.  Drama gives you the opportunity to increase your self-confidence.  Drama helps you to communicate verbally and non-verbally. These skills will help you in any area of work where you have to deal with people. How is the course assessed? 40% practical coursework: You will take part in 2 practical projects during the course. These will each last for 4 weeks. During these, you will be marked upon how you respond to ideas, develop your work and evaluate the work of others. 20% written coursework: Following each of the assessed practical projects, you will produce a set of notes reinforcing your practical work. 40% practical examination: In small groups, you will present a devised or scripted performance to an external examiner. If you choose not to act in this exam, you can be assessed upon your lighting, sound, set or costume designs. However, all students are expected to act in at least one of the practical projects. Who is responsible for the course? Mr S Conway – Head of Performing Arts 25
    • OPTION SUBJECTS GCSE FRENCH English Baccalaureate Part 5 What do you study? French is the language of our closest neighbours on the continent of Europe. It is also spoken by large numbers of people in Belgium and Switzerland, and in West Africa, the Caribbean and the Far East. French is also the language of Thierry Henry and Didier Drogba. And don’t forget that French culture has given us champagne, brie, baguettes, Renault, Citroën, Peugeot, tennis, Alpine ski resorts, Orangina, beautiful beaches, Matisse, Debussy ……. During this course you will learn the basic skills needed to operate in French when travelling abroad or when carrying out simple tasks at work:               Healthy and unhealthy lifestyles and their consequences Relationships with family and friends Social issues and equality Free time activities Shopping, money, fashion and trends Advantages and disadvantages of new technology Holiday plans, preferences, experiences Special occasions celebrated in the home Home, town, neighbourhood and region Current problems facing the planet Being environmentally friendly School, college and future plans Pressures and problems Current and future jobs Assessment The assessment will be 40% examination (Listening and Reading) and 60% controlled assessment (Speaking and Writing). Two levels of examination will be available, Higher and Foundation. But you will be able to take a mixture of levels, depending on your own strengths in the four skills. Where might it lead? The ability to speak and understand a foreign language is becoming more and more valuable for people who want to hold down key jobs in industry and business. It also makes holidays and trips abroad more enjoyable. Learning a foreign language also helps people to have a better understanding of their own language. Who is responsible for the course? Mrs E Kerr – Head of Modern Foreign Languages 26
    • OPTION SUBJECTS GCSE GEOGRAPHY Who is this suitable for? English Baccalaureate Part 4 A student who...  is interested in places  wants an appreciation of the environment and awareness of the ways in which people and places interact  is interested in current affairs  wants the opportunity to carry out practical work outdoors as well as class work  enjoys travel What do you study? There are 4 themes that you will study: 1. Rivers and Coasts 2. Population and Settlement 3. Natural Hazards 4. Economic Development. How is the course assessed? Unit Title Unit 1: Sustainable Decision Making  Decision Making Exercise – opportunity for students to proceed through three stages of investigating issues in sustainable development.  One of the four key themes will be assessed using a resource booklet Unit 2: Geographical Enquiry  Controlled assessment based on Fieldwork Unit 3: Key Geographical Themes  Three of the four units will be assessed in this unit (excludes the theme covered in unit 1) Assessment Written exam 1½ hours long using resource booklet. How much is it worth? 25% Controlled assessment:  Fieldwork focus 25% Written exam 1¾ hours 50% Who is responsible for the course? Mrs E Shuttleworth – Head of Geography 27
    • OPTION SUBJECTS GCSE GERMAN English Baccalaureate Part 5 What do you study? German is the most widely spoken language of the continent of Europe. By learning German you begin to gain an insight into the life of Germany, Austria and Switzerland. We have a long and powerful connection with German culture, which has given us a large part of the English language, Christmas trees, our Royal family, the Protestant religion, Mercedes Benz, BMW, Audi and Toblerone. During this course you will learn the basic skills needed to operate in German when travelling abroad or when carrying out simple tasks at work:               Healthy and unhealthy lifestyles and their consequences Relationships with family and friends Social issues and equality Free time activities Shopping, money, fashion and trends Advantages and disadvantages of new technology Holiday plans, preferences, experiences Special occasions celebrated in the home Home, town, neighbourhood and region Current problems facing the planet Being environmentally friendly School, college and future plans Pressures and problems Current and future jobs Assessment The assessment will be 40% examination (Listening and Reading) and 60% controlled assessment (Speaking and Writing). Two levels of examination will be available, Higher and Foundation. But you will be able to take a mixture of levels, depending on your own strengths in the four skills. Where might it lead? The ability to speak and understand a foreign language is becoming more and more valuable for people who want to hold down key jobs in industry and business. It also makes holidays and trips abroad more enjoyable. Learning a foreign language also helps people to have a better understanding of their own language. Who is responsible for the course? Mrs E Kerr – Head of Modern Foreign Languages 28
    • OPTION SUBJECTS GCSE HISTORY English Baccalaureate Part 4 What do you study? The GCSE syllabus allows you to develop the work covered in Key Stage 3 History – building upon the KNOWLEDGE, UNDERSTANDING and SKILLS introduced in Lower School. The work covers three themes: (1) Study in Development: “Medicine Through Time” looks at the main medical developments over the past 2000 years. (2) Study in Depth: “The American West 1840-1895” considers, in detail, the principal events, people and features of this frontier region in the USA. (3) History Around Us: “Neolithic Stone Circles” is a local study controlled conditions assignment which allows you to apply fieldwork techniques to local historical sites. Why Study History? The School History Project is designed to introduce students to the nature of historical inquiry and these skills are further developed in the Advanced level History course in Years 12/13. History at GCSE is an exciting and stimulating course – requiring an interest in people and the world. We examine historical sources and evaluate their importance in order to reach informed opinions. These skills obviously have value beyond advanced study. How is the course assessed? There are two exam papers which account for 75% of the total mark, but you also submit a controlled conditions assignment in Year 10. This is worth 25% in total. Who is responsible for the course? Mr R J Boardman – Head of Humanities 29
    • OPTION SUBJECTS GCSE ICT What do you study? Unit 1 – Living in a Digital World (Exam: 40% of total Single Award) Topic 1: Personal Digital Devices including Mobile Phones and Tablets Topic 2: Connectivity including Bluetooth, NFC and WiFi Topic 3: Operating Online Topic 4: Online Goods and Services Topic 5: Online Communities including Social Networking Topic 6: Issues Unit 2 – Using Digital Tools (Coursework: 60% of total Single Award) Topic 1: Research and Information Gathering Topic 2: Modelling Topic 3: Digital Publishing Topic 4: Evaluating Outcomes Topic 5: Working Effectively and Efficiently Why Study GCSE ICT?:  Modern and relevant course teaching core skills in ICT including creating business documents, website design and creating engaging visual content  Progress into ICT and other practical Level 3 courses or A Level Computing  All resources are accessible from home at any time How is the course assessed? This is a traditional GCSE with grades from A* - G in both coursework and exam modules. Please note You cannot take this course with GCSE Computing – you must choose one or the other. Who is responsible for the course? Mr J Webber – Head of ICT 30
    • OPTION SUBJECTS GCSE COMPUTING What do you study? This course includes looking at Computer Systems and Programming (40%), a Practical Investigation (30%) and a Programming project (30%). It is intended for those interested and inspired by new technologies who would like a deeper understanding of computer programs. Why study Computing?  You will develop a knowledge of current and emerging technologies  You will acquire technical skills including learning at least one programming language  You will develop computer programs to solve problems  You will evaluate the use and impact of computer technology in society  You will experiment with new technologies including the Raspberry Pi, 3D mobile phones and Tablet PCs. How is the course assessed? Unit A451: Computer Systems & Programming Unit A452: Practical Investigation Unit A453: Programming Project 40% (Written Paper) 30% (Controlled Assessment) 30% (Controlled Assessment) What do I need to take GCSE Computing? You will need to have good English, Maths and ICT skills to complete this qualification. Please note You cannot take this course with GCSE ICT – you must choose one or the other. Who is responsible for the course? Mr J Webber – Head of ICT 31
    • OPTION SUBJECTS CERTIFICATE IN PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT What do you study? By completing interesting, practical challenges and tasks you will develop work skills and key skills, including: Communication, Improving own Learning, Working with Others and Problem Solving. You will study for the Personal and Social Development Entry Level accredited course with opportunities to carry out activities both inside and outside of school and in non-formal situations. For example, all students will gain a recognised first aid qualification. Students in the personal development course will also be provided with substantial literacy and numeracy support to develop their work across the rest of the curriculum. This is not a free option; students are guided into this course by Mr Kenny and Mr Walford. It is designed to work with the Core Science GCSE programme, and students study for the Certificate in Personal Development in Additional Science time. Why study Personal and Social Development? These skills are important because Employers and Colleges want them. They can improve the way you go about tasks, help you to become a better learner and help you to prepare for work and be independent. The lessons will be taught in small groups. How is the course assessed? The certificate is designed to develop, assess and accredit Key and Work Skills. To achieve this you will need to gain a minimum of 8 credits at Level 1. Where will it take you? The PSD course will enable progression to Post-16 Vocational Courses and College Courses. Who is responsible for the course? Mr D Kenny - SENCO 32
    • OPTION SUBJECTS GCSE MEDIA STUDIES What do you study? It is the study of some of the main mass media: film, television, radio, magazines, online and social media, newspapers and the music industry. Why study Media Studies? Not only is Media Studies interesting and relevant, it gives you valuable skills to help understand the world around you. You can apply many of these skills to GCSE English too – students often do better in English when they take Media Studies as well. Also, and most importantly, it can help you appreciate and enjoy the media even more; the media industries are worth £977 billion globally. As a qualification it provides evidence that you can analyse, express ideas well and work independently. It provides a direct link to AS and A2 level Media Studies and it gives you a glimpse of a career in journalism, television, radio or the music industry. “In the modern world, media literacy will become as important a skill as Maths or Science.” Tessa Jowell, Former Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport. How is the course assessed? 60% is controlled conditions assessment and 40% is exam. 1. Exam: Investigating the Media; Written Paper – 1 hour 30 minutes, based on a pre - released topic with guidance and stimulus 2. Controlled Assessment – three assignments done under controlled conditions: Introductory assignment; Cross - media assignment; Practical Production and Evaluation. Who is responsible for the course? Mr G James – Head of English 33
    • OPTION SUBJECTS GCSE MUSIC What do you study? Performing for a start! You will get plenty of time to make music and you will be encouraged to get involved in concerts and performances such as the Autumn Extravaganza and the Battle of the Bands. Composing two original pieces is also part of the coursework and you can decide the style yourself. Of course there is listening to music too and the genres covered include film music, club dance like dubstep, and songs. The course is based around the following areas of study:  My Music  Shared Music  Dance Music  Descriptive Music Why study Music? Well it will be good fun, and will help build social skills and contribute to Key Skills including ICT. If you have invested time and effort in learning to play an instrument or in singing lessons, this could contribute significantly to your potential GCSE grade. If your interests lie in programming and sequencing, using Garageband and Logic, or even DJing or Beatboxing, then the course is still suitable for you. Those who have enjoyed group composing in the lower school will find that GCSE music gives the opportunity to develop your own individual composing style. How is the course assessed? The coursework element of the course is worth 60% of the final mark and consists of 2 performances (recorded), 2 compositions (recorded OR written) and 2 written appraisals. The listening examination is worth 25%, and the remaining 15% represents the creative task which is a timed composition examination. Who is responsible for the course? Mr P Stinchcombe – Head of Music 34
    • OPTION SUBJECTS GCSE PHYSICAL EDUCATION What do you study? You will develop your knowledge and practical skills in a range of physical activities. You will examine the effects of exercise and how training can improve performance. You will find ways to improve your own performances in a variety of roles and identify ways to develop and maintain a healthy active life style. You will learn about the benefits of promoting sport for all. Why study PE?  For enjoyment! If you like playing sport and you are interested in all aspects of sports preparation and performance – then this will appeal to you.  It develops the knowledge, skills and understanding that underpin many other subjects.  It develops your own health and fitness understanding as well as key skills, especially working as a team.  It provides a progressive route to further study. How is the course assessed? 40% Theory based on two external examinations totalling 2 hours. Both exams will include multiple choice questions, short answers and extended answers. 60% Practical – four activities are assessed from a wide variety of activities. You can also choose to be assessed as a leader or official in one activity. You are required to attend at least 1 winter and 1 summer sporting lunchtime practice in order to enhance your coursework grade. Please note You cannot take this course with Cambridge Nationals in Sport – you must choose one or the other. Who is responsible for the course? Miss J Hibbert – Head of Physical Education 35
    • OPTION SUBJECTS CAMBRIDGE NATIONALS IN SPORTS SCIENCE (LEVEL 2) What do you study? The Sports Science course looks at topics connected to the systems of the body. There are two compulsory units on Sports Injuries and Principles of Training and two extra units based on how the body responds to physical activity and the psychology of sport. Much of this course is taught in a practical way. Why study Sport?  For enjoyment! If you like playing sport and you are interested in all aspects of sports preparation and performance – then this will appeal to you.  It develops the knowledge, skills and understanding that underpin many other subjects.  It develops your own health and fitness understanding as well as key skills, especially working as a team.  It provides a progressive route to further study. This vocational course is excellent when thinking about a career in the leisure industry. How is the course assessed? There is one unit assessed by an hour long examination on the topic of Sports Injuries. All other units are assessed by on-going coursework that is internally marked by your teachers but moderated by an external examiner Please note You cannot take this course with GCSE PE – you must choose one or the other. Who is responsible for the course? Miss J Hibbert – Head of Physical Education 36
    • OPTION SUBJECTS GCSE RELIGIOUS STUDIES What do you study? The course covers the beliefs and practices of Buddhism and Christianity. The two elements of the course are Religion and Morality and Worship and Belief. In the Religion and Morality section you will study:  Religious attitudes to matters of life (medical ethics)  Religious attitudes to drug abuse  Religious attitudes to crime and punishment  Religious attitudes to rich and poor in British society  Religious attitudes to world poverty In Worship and Belief section you will study:  Places of worship  Worship  Pilgrimage  Origins and belief  Practices and belonging These topics will be studied with reference to both Buddhism and Christianity. In the exams you will need to answer questions on 4 of the 5 topics studied in each section of the course. Why do we study Religion?      A qualification in Religious Studies enables you to gain an insight into the beliefs and values of different people. To broaden your understanding of the world. In the world of work employers look for someone with an enquiring mind, an appreciation of other people’s viewpoints, an ability to come to clear, balanced decisions. These skills all develop through studying religions. If you want to work with people in caring work, teaching, journalism, publishing, policing, with children, health, catering, leisure and tourism or work abroad or in a cosmopolitan setting, religious studies will give you plenty to think about and valuable skills. It is also a valuable entry qualification to post-16 education, AS and A2 levels and vocational courses. How is the course assessed? The course is assessed by two 1½ hour exams. Who is responsible for the course? Mrs L Pope – Head of Philosophy and Belief 37
    • OPTION SUBJECTS GCSE SPANISH What do you study? English Baccalaureate Part 5 After Chinese and English, Spanish is the most widely spoken language in the world. By learning Spanish you are getting a passport to Spain, South and Central America and parts of the Caribbean. Spain is a major holiday destination and is the land of Real Madrid, bullfighting, tortillas, Picasso, Barcelona, sherry, flamenco music and the guitar. During this course you will learn the basic skills needed to operate in Spanish when travelling abroad or when carrying out simple tasks at work:               Healthy and unhealthy lifestyles and their consequences Relationships with family and friends Social issues and equality Free time activities Shopping, money, fashion and trends Advantages and disadvantages of new technology Holiday plans, preferences, experiences Special occasions celebrated in the home Home, town, neighbourhood and region Current problems facing the planet Being environmentally friendly School, college and future plans Pressures and problems Current and future jobs Assessment The assessment will be 40% examination (Listening and Reading) and 60% controlled assessment (Speaking and Writing). Two levels of examination will be available, Higher and Foundation. But you will be able to take a mixture of levels, depending on your own strengths in the four skills. Where might it lead? The ability to speak and understand a foreign language is becoming more and more valuable for people who want to hold down key jobs in industry and business. It also makes holidays and trips abroad more enjoyable. Learning a foreign language also helps people to have a better understanding of their own language. Who is responsible for the course? Mrs E Kerr – Head of Modern Foreign Languages 38
    • OPTIONS PATTERN Core Science English Language, English Literature, Mathematics, Core ICT, Core PE, Philosophy and Ethics (Short Course), PSHE, Work Experience Pupils will be selected for: either Triple Science (top two groups only); or Core Science and Additional Science; or Core Science and the Certificate of Personal and Social Development Either Or Academic Pathway Applied Pathway Option A Humanity (History or Geography) B Language (French, German or Spanish) C D BTEC Construction (Double Option for nominated students only) Child Development and Care (Double Option) Free Choice of two plus a reserve from: GCSE Art GCSE Computing GCSE Dance GCSE Drama GCSE Food Technology GCSE French GCSE Geography GCSE History GCSE Media Studies GCSE Music GCSE PE GCSE Product Design GCSE Religious Studies GCSE Systems and Control GCSE Spanish GCSE Textiles Cambridge National in Sport Reserve All students must choose a reserve option. Choice Prohibited combinations You cannot take the same subject twice, including:  Cambridge National in Sport with GCSE PE  GCSE ICT with GCSE Computing  Duplicating choices from Options A and B in Options C and D 39 GCSE ICT and Cambridge National Business (Double Option)
    • COMPLETING YOUR OPTIONS Logging on to the Insight Parent Portal You can access the portal directly at https://insight.chewvalleyschool.co.uk/. You will need to log on to the portal using a parental username and password. Student access to the portal does not include the options offer panel. If you have forgotten your username and/or password, please contact our Insight administrator, Mrs Leigh Moncrieffe, via email on lmoncrieffe@chewvalleyschool.co.uk. Accessing Options Offer When you have logged on with parental access, you will see the “Options Offer” icon in the left hand menu. Click this icon to access the options form. Using Options Offer Within the options offer screen, make your choices by clicking the icon next to the subject you want to opt for. Navigate between Options A, B, C and D using the tabs at the top. Remember to choose two options and a reserve choice in Options C and D. Your options are automatically saved. Options Offer will close on Wednesday 22nd January. 40
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