Globish:Is it a true Language?<br />Cheryl Bennett<br />Professor Leiske<br />Comm 200<br />March 8, 2010<br />
Globish is not a language; it is a conversing tool. <br />Globish: Is it a True Language?<br />
Globish is a simple form of the American-English language in which some words are replaced with short phrases and where gr...
Globish is a linguistical tool in use by other non-American cultures so that they can converse easily and be understood be...
This term was coined by Jean-Paul Nerrière, a former vice-president of IBM.<br />(Cohen, 2006, par 8)<br />Where did Globi...
As presented by Noam Cohen of the New York Times, “for the word nephew, there is “son of my brother/sister”; kitchen is “r...
References<br />
Cohen, N., (August 6, 2006.) Ideas & Trends: So<br />	English is Taking Over the Globe; So What. New York Times on the 	We...
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Globish

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Is there a single language being used throughout the world today? In many ways yes.

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Globish

  1. 1. Globish:Is it a true Language?<br />Cheryl Bennett<br />Professor Leiske<br />Comm 200<br />March 8, 2010<br />
  2. 2. Globish is not a language; it is a conversing tool. <br />Globish: Is it a True Language?<br />
  3. 3. Globish is a simple form of the American-English language in which some words are replaced with short phrases and where grammar is of little consequence.<br />Definition<br />
  4. 4. Globish is a linguistical tool in use by other non-American cultures so that they can converse easily and be understood between different languages.<br />Why use Globish?<br />
  5. 5. This term was coined by Jean-Paul Nerrière, a former vice-president of IBM.<br />(Cohen, 2006, par 8)<br />Where did Globish come from?<br />
  6. 6. As presented by Noam Cohen of the New York Times, “for the word nephew, there is “son of my brother/sister”; kitchen is “room in which you cook your food”; chat is “speak casually to each other” (2006, par 9.)<br />Examples<br />
  7. 7. References<br />
  8. 8. Cohen, N., (August 6, 2006.) Ideas & Trends: So<br /> English is Taking Over the Globe; So What. New York Times on the Web. Retrieved March 1, 2010 from <br />http://www.nytimes.com/2006/08/06/<br />weekinre view/06cohen.html?ex=1312516800&en=189a280820ccd6da&ei=5090&partner=rssuserland&emc=rss<br />

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