Improving Student Outcomes

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Chegg talked to educators, employers and current college students to examine why a current skills gap exists. The report reveals an important perspective to the ongoing skills gap and extends the narrative on Chegg’s findings from last year’s “Bridge That Gap” study (www.chegg.com/pulse).

The following presentation was shared at the ASU/GSV Education Innovation Summit on April 22nd, 2014. Presented by Chegg CEO Dan Rosensweig.

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Improving Student Outcomes

  1. Improving Student Outcomes Dan Rosensweig President & CEO
  2. Here’s why students said they went to COLLEGE 70%said they’re in college to TO GET A GOOD JOB Source: Cheggheads Panel Research, October 2013
  3. And here’s what’s ACTUALLY HAPPENING 12.8% Unemployment for recent grads 40% Said they did not get a job in their major 42% Said their job does not require a 4-year degree $29,400 Average student loan debt
  4. And people are BEGINNING TO NOTICE “Just Graduated and Fumbling Through a First Job” “Why millennials have a tough time landing a job” “What’s an American degree worth?” “To Reach the New Market for Education, Colleges have Some Learning to Do” “America’s Youngest Workers Destined for Failure
  5. Current college students Educators at 2 & 4-year universities Employers of recent graduates All  weighted,  na.onal  and  projectable.   It’s not working for anyone SO WE DECIDED TO TALK TO EVERYONE
  6. Why did you go to college? How prepared are you for the working world? Whose job is it to teach job skills & readiness? Here’s what we asked STUDENTS
  7. Why do you think students go to college? Whose job is it to teach job skills & readiness? How well prepared were your graduates? Then we asked educators PAID TO TEACH THEM
  8.     What’s the primary purpose of a degree? Whose job is it to teach job skills & readiness? How well prepared were your new hires? Finally, we talked to the people that WILL HOPEFULLY HIRE THEM
  9. Let the finger pointing begin
  10. Q. What are the main reasons you decided to go to college…? IMMEDIATE NEEDS Students are focusing on their 73% 71% 57% 43% 32% Gain greater earning potential Be ready for the world of work Become a strong critical thinker Get a broad general education STUDENTS   Gain skills employers value & are willing to pay for Source: Improving Student Outcomes, Crux Research, March 2014
  11. LONG TERM CAREERS Educators are focusing on students’ 80% 65% 55% 48% 30% EDUCATORS   Strong critical thinkers Grads who’ve been exposed to new ideas Grads with a broad, general education Job-ready grads Grads with greater earning potential Q. The primary purpose of 4-year colleges/universities are to produce …? Source: Improving Student Outcomes, Crux Research, March 2014
  12. BOTH WAYS And employers want it Grads with skills employers are willing to pay for Job-ready grads Grads with greater earning potential Q. The primary purpose of 4-year colleges/universities are to produce …? 57% 55% 54% 43% 25% EMPLOYERS   Grads with a broad, general education Strong critical thinkers Source: Improving Student Outcomes, Crux Research, March 2014
  13.     A SKILLS GAP & EXPECTATIONS GAP We have both Educators said: To create strong critical thinkers Employers said: To hire job-ready grads who are strong critical thinkers Students said: To get a good job
  14. Whose job is it to fix it?
  15. TEACH THEM THE SKILLS 80% of students think it’s up to someone else to Employers Students ParentsEducators STUDENTS   Q. Who is responsible for teaching the job skills that meet employers’ needs? Source: Improving Student Outcomes, Crux Research, March 2014
  16. THEMSELVES AND SOMEONE ELSE Educators are split between EDUCATORS   Employers Students ParentsEducators Q. Who is responsible for teaching the job skills that meet employers’ needs? Source: Improving Student Outcomes, Crux Research, March 2014
  17. SOMEONE ELSE’S JOB 70% of employers think that it’s EMPLOYERS   Students Employers ParentsEducators 39% 32% 24% 5% Q. Who is responsible for teaching the job skills that meet employers’ needs? Source: Improving Student Outcomes, Crux Research, March 2014
  18.     COMPLETE MISALIGNMENT The real gap is a Educators want to teach students for the long term. Employers want both on day 1. Students just want the skills to get their first job.
  19. FOR ALL ENTRY-LEVEL JOBS There’s a universal demand for soft & hard skills Accounting/ Finance Medical/ Health IT/Software Sales/Biz Dev Engineering Training/ Instruction •  MS Office •  Communication skills •  Analytical skills •  Communication skills •  MS Office •  AutoCAD •  Communication skills •  Java •  SQL •  Communication skills •  MS Office •  Computer skills •  Communication skills •  MS Office •  Team player •  Communication skills •  MS Office •  Team player Source: 1000 entry-level online job postings from Indeed.com, LinkedIn, Monster.com
  20. BASIC TECHNICAL PROFICIENCY The modern workplace demands Word processing Q. How important is it for a recent grad to be proficient to succeed in their first job at your organization %  IMPORTANT  /CRITICAL   Spreadsheet software Data analytics and business intelligence Database (queries and manipulation) Personal information management (PIM) Presentation design, etc Software development environments Visual design software Web publishing Video publishing/editing 89% 86% 82% 81% 77% 76% 65% 60% 59% 56% Source: Improving Student Outcomes, Crux Research, March 2014
  21. Many students are already TAKING CONTROL 7 in 10 Students say they want to take at least one online course 6 in 10 Students say they’d pay for at least one online course 2.2M Undergrads at non-profit schools have taken at least one online course Sources: Chegg National Student Survey, October 2013 IPEDS Data, 2012
  22. Students are willing to take ownership now. BUT TO REALLY CHANGE… Everyone has a role in fixing this problem
  23. What we propose     Modernize curriculum to be job relevant. Incorporate today’s technology tools to make students more software proficient in the classroom. Invest in career services to the same degree you invest in admissions or athletics. Build a full scale program. Appreciate that the long term value of addressing the gap now will secure the future success of your brand. F O R I N S T I T U T I O N S 1 2 3 4
  24.     Work with schools to help them evolve the curriculum to best support students. Be generous with paid internships. Give students real life experience before they hit the workplace. Take a chance on today’s students – make skill training available to them and certify that those skills were worth learning. F O R E M P L O Y E R S 1 2 3 What we propose
  25.     Modernize your curriculum so what you’re teaching matches the needs & experiences of the outside world. Keep close communication with your students to understand changing needs. Take the time to understand and stay current with new learning sources so that you can help students go the extra mile. F O R E D U C A T O R S 1 2 3 What we propose
  26.     Invest in yourself. Recognize that no one else is responsible for your future but you. Understand that majors and job skills may no longer match. You may be less prepared than you think you are. •  40% said they did not get a job in their major •  42% said their job does not require a 4-year degree Find out what will make you stand out in the job market. Leverage supplemental online and offline tools to round out your portfolio of skills. F O R S T U D E N T S 1 2 3 What we propose
  27.     Embrace the changing education space. It’s happening (whether you like it or not). Stop trying to fix what was, and start addressing what is. This problem is knowable &fixable. So…

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