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2013: NJ GMIS: Emergency Communications
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2013: NJ GMIS: Emergency Communications

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This presentation describes MCUrgent, Morris County NJ's multi-jurisdicational digital communications network.

This presentation describes MCUrgent, Morris County NJ's multi-jurisdicational digital communications network.

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  • http://www.slideshare.net/hootsuite/hootsuite-morris-county-case-study <br /> http://www.slideshare.net/MorrisCountyNJ/2013-emergencycommunication-njgmis <br />

2013: NJ GMIS: Emergency Communications Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Emergency Communications Getting Prepared and Making it Happen Carol A Spencer Digital & Social Media Manager April 11, 2013
  • 2. Emergency Communications in the Social Space •Why use social media •Know your audience •What should be posted •Challenges along the way •Plan. Plan. Plan.
  • 3. WHY use social media
  • 4. Why be in the social space We’re social… • 1 in 8 US married couples met via social media. • If FB were a country, it would be the 3rd largest. • Fastest growing segment on FB is women, 55 - 65 • Gen Y (17 to 34) & Gen X (35 to 45) have abandoned email. • 96% of Gen Y belong to a social network. • Gen X and Gen Y are our families, workers, commuters, taxpayers, voters…
  • 5. Why be in the social space We’re mobile… • US mobile penetration: 110% (phones, tablets) • There are more than 100M smartphone users in the US, up 13% since October, 2011. • Nearly 40M US mobile users access social sites every day • 74.6% of adults text message on their phones • 87% of teens text message on their phones • People just expect to get information online
  • 6. The Expectation Gap Everbridge Survey of 400 Public/Private Agencies • Communications planners recognize the value of social media • 58%, however, do not have it included in their communications plans • Primary reason: lack of authorization to do so • Secondary reason: lack of staff to implement • Critical situational information missing by not using social media • 84.5% question the reliability of landlines for emergency communication • 76.1% agree mobile is a critical element Everbridge.com ~ January 2013
  • 7. Emergency Communications • Television: local jurisdictions don’t typically have access; worthless without electricity • Radio: Lack of local broadcast channels • Reverse 9-1-1: Many have given up their landlines and replaced with unlisted cell phones • Websites: Outsourced? Local server? Need web professional • CRM Systems: Expensive, require registration • Social Media: Doesn’t require electricity, registration, anyone can post from anywhere
  • 8. Social & Mobile are the Norm Twitter Microblog Facebook Network LinkedIn Network Flickr Still Photos YouTube Video Pinterest Online Pinboard Google Email, Apps Vimeo Video Foursquare Location app Scribd Documents RSS Feed Subscription WordPress Blog SlideShare Presentations Skype Phone, chat Blogger Blog
  • 9. Social Media: Critical during emergencies  Social media is the first place people go for information during an emergency  Messages are retrievable on any device  Messages are retrievable when power is out  Runs on non-local, redundant servers: • Twitter, Facebook, Google (Blogger, YouTube) • It stays up when your own website may be down  People can message your jurisdiction via Facebook comments or Twitter mentions  You can post to social media from a phone. (You cannot typically update a website from your phone.)
  • 10. Social Media: Critical during emergencies  It lets people know their government is working, reducing feelings of isolation, which lead to fear and anxiety  Reduces phone calls looking for information  Increases public participation  Information is sharable and spreads faster than possible with any other communication channel  People around the world can access the information. Parents / children out of state stay informed.
  • 11. Know your AUDIENCE
  • 12. Know your audience(s) •Residents •Disabled citizens •Employers •Employees-your agency •Schools •Non-profit agencies •Volunteers •Emergency response personnel •Fellow government communicators
  • 13. Speak to your audience(s) •Residents: let them know where to get info •Disabled citizens: find them, identify needs •Employers: share official sources of info •Agency employees: share workplace status •Schools: know their channels •Non-profit agencies: know available resources •Volunteers: know where/how they can help •Emergency response personnel: get input •Fellow government communicators: share
  • 14. WHAT should be posted
  • 15. About Emergency Posting •Declared Emergencies •Anything that disrupts movement Closed / severely impacted roadways Mass transit impacts •Anything that impacts safety Severe weather Power outages Rising rivers / flood potential Impactful planned events •Use visuals (photo / video) where possible People scan, don’t read, online Video that adds value
  • 16. About Emergency Posting •Use every channel possible Social media adds to, not replaces, traditional methods Generational  Seniors (68+): landlines, minimal cell, email  Boomers (49 - 67): cell, email, social media  Gen X (33 – 48): cell, social media  Gen Y (18 – 32): cell, social media •Monitor your media Don’t feel you have to respond to every comment Answer questions. If you don’t know, let them know you’re researching. •Remember: It’s a conversation, not a poster.
  • 17. CHALLENGES along the way
  • 18. General Challenges • • • • • Going where no man has gone before. The speed of government. Too much noise. Too many products. Bleeding edge: Is anyone using it? Legal hurdles – Terms of Service Agreements – Credit Cards / Purchasing – Policies: • What others can say on your sites • What you can say and how to say it on your own sites • What your representatives can / should say on other sites – Copyright Infringement • Employees – – – – Regulating workplace use Job descriptions – extra pay? Training: tools, terms, tone Regulating outside use / first amendment
  • 19. Organizational Challenges 1 • Budget Cycle and Lack of Resources • Changing Organizational Culture • Ensuring the Quality of Data • Increasing Public Interest and Engagement • Balancing Autonomy and Control • Accountability and Responsibility 1 An Open Government Implementation Model: Moving to Increased Public Engagement Gwanhoo Lee, Associate Professor, Kogod School of Business, The American University Young Hoon Kwak, Associate Professor, School of Business, The George Washington University IBM Center for The Business of Government (BusinessofGovernment.org); 2011
  • 20. Technological Challenges 1 • Improving IT Infrastructure • Enhancing Privacy and Information Security • Integrating Tools and Applications • Updating Policies and Rules 1 An Open Government Implementation Model: Moving to Increased Public Engagement Gwanhoo Lee, Associate Professor, Kogod School of Business, The American University Young Hoon Kwak, Associate Professor, School of Business, The George Washington University IBM Center for The Business of Government (BusinessofGovernment.org); 2011
  • 21. PLAN Plan. Plan.
  • 22. Plan. Plan. Plan. • Identify your audiences. • Design and build targeted social segments before you need them. • Train personnel in advance, including sufficient backup personnel. • Have a written communications plan. • Understand the emergency reporting structure: ICS • Have policies adopted and posted. • Use non-emergency social media to practice and get your voice.
  • 23. In Summary •Why use social media Because citizens live in this space •Know your audience Be prepared to communicate with all •What should be posted Anything that will significantly and/or negatively impact people’s lives. •Challenges along the way General, Organizational, Technical Tackle what you can •Plan. Plan. Plan. Design, staff, training, voice, policies Practice
  • 24. Contact Information Carol A. Spencer Digital & Social Media Manager, Morris County Website : MorrisCountyNJ.gov Email : CSpencer@co.morris.nj.us or CarolSpencerNJ@gmail.com Facebook : Facebook.com/MorrisCountyNJ Facebook : Facebook.com/MCUrgent Twitter : Twitter.com/MorrisCountyNJ Twitter : Twitter.com/MCUrgent (or MCUrgent.com)
  • 25. Emergency Communications Getting Prepared and Making it Happen Carol A Spencer Digital & Social Media Manager April 11, 2013
  • 26. M r i s Count y’ s Shar ed, M t i or ul j ur i sdi ct i onal Em gency I nf or m i on Net wor k er at
  • 27. What is MCUrgent • An application that utilizes the power of social media to share official emergency information during a multijurisdictional emergency. • Led by Morris County’s Office of Emergency Management, MCUrgent will ultimately include all 39 towns posting to a single Twitter feed and Facebook page. • Used only in multi-jurisdictional emergencies. Individual town emergency notices go to that town’s website, Twitter feed or Facebook, G+ or LinkedIn page.
  • 28. How Does MCUrgent Work #MCParsip RT 46 WB between New Rd and Rt 202/Parsippany Rd flooded. All lanes closed. 6:37 AM Mar 15 via Twitter th Twitter (MCUrgent) Facebook Parsippany (MCUrgent) Morris Twp Denville Riverdale Dover Twitter Towns create a post using Hootsuite (MorrisCountyNJ) Facebook (MorrisCountyNJ) Twitter (Town feed) Facebook (Town page)
  • 29. What is MCUrgent • An application that utilizes the power of social media to share official emergency information during a multijurisdictional emergency. • Led by Morris County’s Office of Emergency Management, MCUrgent will ultimately include all 39 towns posting to a single Twitter feed and Facebook page. • Used only in multi-jurisdictional emergencies. Individual town emergency notices go to that town’s website, Twitter feed or Facebook, G+ or LinkedIn page.
  • 30. Twitter is the Basis for MCUrgent • No login required to get messages • Short, easily scanned messages link back to web pages • Twitter widgets freely available; easy to put on web pages • Twitter RSS feed can be pulled into many apps • Twitter Fast Follow capability sends posts as txt messages • Can post from desktop, laptop, tablet, iPhone, iPad, Android phones, Blackberry phones. • Often, text can get out when phone calls cannot. • Use Hootsuite.com or similar dashboard to post to multiple networks at once
  • 31. Stats: Hurricane Irene 2011 Website(s) •Homepage views Irene Typical 75,155 26,000 Blogger •Irene & MorrisCountyNJ 36,991 2,400 Facebook •MorrisCountyNJ •MCUrgent 49,610 99,005 5,500 400 Twitter •MorrisCountyNJ •MCUrgent 169,292 20,448 18,000 0 450,337 52,300 TOTAL VIEWS
  • 32. Stats: Hurricane Sandy 2012
  • 33. Public Opinion
  • 34. Emergency Communications Getting Prepared and Making it Happen Carol A Spencer Digital & Social Media Manager April 11, 2013