Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
EBM Lecture in Los Cabos
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Introducing the official SlideShare app

Stunning, full-screen experience for iPhone and Android

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

EBM Lecture in Los Cabos

515
views

Published on

First part by Giordano, second part by CharlieNeck

First part by Giordano, second part by CharlieNeck

Published in: Health & Medicine

2 Comments
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
No Downloads
Views
Total Views
515
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
42
Comments
2
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • \n
  • \n
  • ¿Qué sentimientos genera el escuchar MBE?\nalgunos podrían sentir que estamos ante el nacimiento de una nueva era ¿pero realmente está floreciendo una nueva medicina, diferente a la que todos estamos acostumbrados?\n
  • otros lo ven al revés ¿estamos presenciando cómo esa moda denominada MBE está a punto de morir?\n
  • vámonos por partes... \nla MBE integra 3 esferas (pericia, evidencia, pacientes). Es obvio que siempre hemos usado nuestra pericia/experiencia. Y bueno, poco a poco se está involucrando más al paciente. ¿Y la evidencia? ¿realmente es nuevo tomar en cuenta los estudios para tomar decisiones?\n
  • voy a contarles 3 cuentos que ilustran cómo hemos usado la investigación para guiar tratamientos desde hace siglos... y qué pasa si no la usamos...\nal final, mi parte va a concluír porqué deberíamos hacer una practica basada en la evidencia\n
  • \n
  • \n
  • érase una vez... piratas y marineros enfermos, con dientes grotescos, encías esponjadas y sangrantes...\n\n
  • Since antiquity in various parts of the world, and since the 17th century in England, it had been known that citrus fruit had an antiscorbutic effect, when John Woodall (1570–1643), an English military surgeon of the British East India Company recommended them[5] but their use did not become widespread.\nAlthough Lind was not the first to suggest citrus fruit as a cure for scurvy, he was the first to study their effect by a systematic experiment in 1747.[6] It ranks as one of the first clinical experiments in the history of medicine.\nLind thought that scurvy was due to putrefaction of the body which could be helped by acids, and thus included a dietary supplement of an acidic quality in the experiment. This began after two months at sea when the ship was afflicted with scurvy. He divided twelve scorbutic sailors into six groups of two. They all received the same diet but, in addition, group one was given a quart of cider daily, group two twenty-five drops of elixir of vitriol (sulfuric acid), group three six spoonfuls of vinegar, group four half a pint of seawater, group five received two oranges and one lemon, and the last group a spicy paste plus a drink of barley water. The treatment of group five stopped after six days when they ran out of fruit, but by that time one sailor was fit for duty while the other had almost recovered. Apart from that, only group one also showed some effect of its treatment.\n\n
  • \n
  • \n
  • desde entonces ya pensábamos en cómo podríamos obtener pruebas objetivas, verdadera evidencia, para saber si algo funciona o no...\n¿a poco lo que pedía no era un ECA doble ciego?\n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • For example, anti-arrhythmic drugs were prescribed widely – with the United States Food and Drug Administration’s approval – to heart-attack victims for more than a decade, under the assumption that reducing heart-rhythm abnormalities would decrease mortality rates. But, as the investigative journalist Thomas J. Moore reported in his book Deadly Medicine, at the peak of their use, these drugs were killing more Americans each year than were killed during the entire Vietnam War.\n\nFollowing this revelation, a British research team reported a clinical trial that they had carried out more than a decade earlier. Their study had found a higher death rate among patients receiving a new anti-arrhythmic drug than among those receiving a placebo. They had not published the results, they explained, because the drug’s development had been abandoned for commercial reasons. In retrospect, however, they observed that their results “might have provided early warning of trouble ahead.”\n
  • For example, anti-arrhythmic drugs were prescribed widely – with the United States Food and Drug Administration’s approval – to heart-attack victims for more than a decade, under the assumption that reducing heart-rhythm abnormalities would decrease mortality rates. But, as the investigative journalist Thomas J. Moore reported in his book Deadly Medicine, at the peak of their use, these drugs were killing more Americans each year than were killed during the entire Vietnam War.\n\nFollowing this revelation, a British research team reported a clinical trial that they had carried out more than a decade earlier. Their study had found a higher death rate among patients receiving a new anti-arrhythmic drug than among those receiving a placebo. They had not published the results, they explained, because the drug’s development had been abandoned for commercial reasons. In retrospect, however, they observed that their results “might have provided early warning of trouble ahead.”\n
  • For example, anti-arrhythmic drugs were prescribed widely – with the United States Food and Drug Administration’s approval – to heart-attack victims for more than a decade, under the assumption that reducing heart-rhythm abnormalities would decrease mortality rates. But, as the investigative journalist Thomas J. Moore reported in his book Deadly Medicine, at the peak of their use, these drugs were killing more Americans each year than were killed during the entire Vietnam War.\n\nFollowing this revelation, a British research team reported a clinical trial that they had carried out more than a decade earlier. Their study had found a higher death rate among patients receiving a new anti-arrhythmic drug than among those receiving a placebo. They had not published the results, they explained, because the drug’s development had been abandoned for commercial reasons. In retrospect, however, they observed that their results “might have provided early warning of trouble ahead.”\n
  • For example, anti-arrhythmic drugs were prescribed widely – with the United States Food and Drug Administration’s approval – to heart-attack victims for more than a decade, under the assumption that reducing heart-rhythm abnormalities would decrease mortality rates. But, as the investigative journalist Thomas J. Moore reported in his book Deadly Medicine, at the peak of their use, these drugs were killing more Americans each year than were killed during the entire Vietnam War.\n\nFollowing this revelation, a British research team reported a clinical trial that they had carried out more than a decade earlier. Their study had found a higher death rate among patients receiving a new anti-arrhythmic drug than among those receiving a placebo. They had not published the results, they explained, because the drug’s development had been abandoned for commercial reasons. In retrospect, however, they observed that their results “might have provided early warning of trouble ahead.”\n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • tenemos que entender estos trucos publicitarios.\n
  • tenemos que entender estos trucos publicitarios.\n
  • tenemos que entender estos trucos publicitarios.\n
  • tenemos que entender estos trucos publicitarios.\n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • Transcript

    • 1. La Práctica ClínicaBasada en la Evidencia Dr. Carlos A. Cuello García Dr. Giordano Pérez Gaxiola
    • 2. Declaración conflicto de interesesLos ponentes declaramos no tener relación económica algunacon compañías u organismos que tengan relación con laactual charla. Agradecemos invitación por parte del Colegio deMédicos Cirujanos de San José del Cabo A.C. www.sinestetoscopio.com
    • 3. MBE: ¿el comienzo?
    • 4. MBE: ¿el fin?
    • 5. M.B.E. Experiencia Pruebas objetivasPericia clínica Investigación Valores y preferencias de los pacientes www.sinestetoscopio.com
    • 6. Érase una v!... www.sinestetoscopio.com
    • 7. El ma"nero cu"oso Los tractores fantá$icos Spock y la tierra de los Sueñoswww.sinestetoscopio.com
    • 8. El ma"nero cu"oso www.sinestetoscopio.com
    • 9. Escorbutowww.sinestetoscopio.com
    • 10. 1747. James Lind Ácido Agua de 2 naranjasSidra Vinagre Cebada Sulfúrico mar 1 limón www.sinestetoscopio.com
    • 11. Los tractores fantá$icos www.sinestetoscopio.com
    • 12. www.sinestetoscopio.com
    • 13. “Los tractores han obtenido tan altareputación en nuestra localidad, incluso entre personas de alto rango y educación, que han llamado la atención de los médicos. Que su mérito sea investigado de maneraimparcial, para respaldar su fama si realmente tiene fundamento, o para corregir la opinión pública si sólo se basa en una falsa ilusión. Prepare un par de falsos tractores, exactamente iguales a los reales. Que elsecreto sea inviolable, no sólo por el pacientesino por cualquier persona. Que la eficacia sea evaluada imparcialmente y los resultados expresados en palabras que entiendan los pacientes” www.sinestetoscopio.com
    • 14. 1799.- John Haygarth• Primero se probaron los tractores “falsos” = de 5 pacientes 4 mejoraron.• Seguido se probaron los “reales” = de 5 pacientes 4 mejoraron. Haygarth, J., Of the Imagination, as a Cause and as a Cure of Disorders of the Body; Exemplified by Fictitious Tractors, and Epidemical Convulsions (New Edition, with Additional Remarks), Crutwell, (Bath), 1801. www.sinestetoscopio.com
    • 15. Spock y la tierra de los Sueños www.sinestetoscopio.com
    • 16. ...un doctor llamado Benjamín...
    • 17. ...en 1946esc"bió un libro... www.sinestetoscopio.com
    • 18. 1958 ...“si un niño vomitapuede broncoa&irarse”... www.sinestetoscopio.com
    • 19. 50,000,000 de copias vendidas1946 1958 1998 www.sinestetoscopio.com
    • 20. ¿Por qué lo hizo? Experiencia Buenas intenciones Lógica Ideología ¿Pruebas científicas? www.sinestetoscopio.com
    • 21. Opinión www.sinestetoscopio.com
    • 22. Opinión Recomendación www.sinestetoscopio.com
    • 23. Opinión Recomendación Norma www.sinestetoscopio.com
    • 24. Opinión Recomendación Norma www.sinestetoscopio.com
    • 25. 50,000,000 de copias vendidas1946 1958 1998
    • 26. 50,000,000 de copias vendidas Frogat1946 1958 1970 1998
    • 27. 50,000,000 de copias vendidas Frogat1946 1958 1970 1998 1991 Dwyer 1986 Beal 1991Engelberts 1986Tonkin 1990 Fleming 1988 Lee
    • 28. 50,000,000 de copias vendidas Frogat1946 1958 1970 1992 1998 1991 Dwyer 1986 Beal 1991Engelberts 1986Tonkin 1990 Fleming 1988 Lee
    • 29. 50,000,000 de copias vendidas Frogat1946 1958 1970 1992 1994 1998 1993 Ponsonby 1994 Gormally 1994 Jorch 1991 Dwyer 1986 Beal 1991Engelberts 1986Tonkin 1990 Fleming 1988 Lee
    • 30. 50,000,000 de copias vendidas Frogat1946 1958 1970 1992 1994 1998 1993 Ponsonby 1994 Gormally 1994 Jorch 1991 Dwyer 1986 Beal 1991Engelberts 1986Tonkin 1990 Fleming 1988 Lee
    • 31. 50,000,000 de copias vendidas Frogat1946 1958 1970 1992 1994 1998 1993 Ponsonby 1994 Gormally 1994 Jorch 1991 Dwyer 1986 Beal 1991Engelberts 1986Tonkin 1990 Fleming 1988 Lee
    • 32. 50,000,000 de copias vendidas Frogat1946 1958 1970 1992 1994 1998 1993 Ponsonby 1994 Gormally 1994 Jorch 1991 Dwyer 1986 Beal 1991Engelberts 1986Tonkin 1990 Fleming ➠ 11+ 1988 Lee 1995 Klonoff-cohen
    • 33. SMSI y posición al dormir, 1988-2003 (Muertes por 1000 nacidos vivos) Porcentaje de niños durmiendoSMSI boca arriba www.sinestetoscopio.com
    • 34. Gilbert R. International Journal of Epidemiology 2005;34:874–887 www.sinestetoscopio.com
    • 35. ¿Y de lado?www.sinestetoscopio.com
    • 36. Gilbert R. International Journal of Epidemiology 2005;34:874–887 www.sinestetoscopio.com
    • 37. Evidencia de daño desde 1970Si se hubiera hecho una revisión sistemática......se hubieran prevenido más de 50,000 muertes Gilbert R. International Journal of Epidemiology 2005;34:874–887
    • 38. Primum non nocere
    • 39. Primum non nocereEsteroides en TCE
    • 40. Primum non nocereEsteroides en TCEFlecainida en IAM
    • 41. Primum non nocereEsteroides en TCEFlecainida en IAM Oxígeno en RN
    • 42. Primum non nocere Esteroides en TCE Flecainida en IAM Oxígeno en RNReposo en lumbalgia
    • 43. ¿Por qué M.B.E? Experiencia Pruebas objetivasPericia clínica Investigación Valores y preferencias de los pacientes www.sinestetoscopio.com
    • 44. ¿Por qué M.B.E?1. Porque podemos hacer daño www.sinestetoscopio.com
    • 45. ¿Por qué M.B.E?1. Porque podemos hacer daño2. Porque se pueden aprovechar de nosotros www.sinestetoscopio.com
    • 46. ¡EXTRA EXTRA!MEDICAMENTO MILAGROSO REDUCE MUERTES EN UN 34%!
    • 47. “Reduce la mortalidad en un 34%” www.sinestetoscopio.com
    • 48. “2.5% de los pacientes tratados murieron -vs- 3.9% en el grupo placebo – una diferencia de 1.4%” www.sinestetoscopio.com
    • 49. “Se necesita tratar a 71 pacientes por 5 años para evitar que 1 muera” www.sinestetoscopio.com
    • 50. Cómo se presentó la Aceptaron cambiarMedida información a este tx El uso de un nuevo hipolipemianteRRR redujo en un 34% los infartos al miocardio 88% 2.5% de los pxs con el medicamento DR tuvo IAM vs 3.9% en el grupo control – una diferencia de 1.4% 42%NNT Se necesita tratar a 71 pacientes por 5 años para evitar 1 infarto. 31% Hux & Naylor. Med Decis Making 1995;15;152-7 www.sinestetoscopio.com
    • 51. Cómo se presentó la Aceptaron cambiarMedida información a este tx El uso de un nuevo hipolipemianteRRR redujo en un 34% los infartos al miocardio 88% 2.5% de los pxs con el medicamento DR tuvo IAM vs 3.9% en el grupo control – una diferencia de 1.4% 42%NNT Se necesita tratar a 71 pacientes por 5 años para evitar 1 infarto. 31% Hux & Naylor. Med Decis Making 1995;15;152-7 www.sinestetoscopio.com
    • 52. Cómo se presentó la Aceptaron cambiarMedida información a este tx El uso de un nuevo hipolipemianteRRR redujo en un 34% los infartos al miocardio 88% 2.5% de los pxs con el medicamento DR tuvo IAM vs 3.9% en el grupo control – una diferencia de 1.4% 42%NNT Se necesita tratar a 71 pacientes por 5 años para evitar 1 infarto. 31% Hux & Naylor. Med Decis Making 1995;15;152-7 www.sinestetoscopio.com
    • 53. Cómo se presentó la Aceptaron cambiarMedida información a este tx El uso de un nuevo hipolipemianteRRR redujo en un 34% los infartos al miocardio 88% 2.5% de los pxs con el medicamento DR tuvo IAM vs 3.9% en el grupo control – una diferencia de 1.4% 42%NNT Se necesita tratar a 71 pacientes por 5 años para evitar 1 infarto. 31% Hux & Naylor. Med Decis Making 1995;15;152-7 www.sinestetoscopio.com
    • 54. ¿Por qué M.B.E?1. Porque podemos hacer daño2. Porque se pueden aprovechar de nosotros www.sinestetoscopio.com
    • 55. www.sinestetoscopio.com
    • 56. Archie Cochrane • “Una gran crítica a nuestra profesión es que no tengamos sumarios clínicos que aparezcan y se actualicen de manera periódica, organizados por especialidad o sub- especialidad, de todos los ensayos clínicos que al momento existen.”
    • 57. Fuga del conocimiento
    • 58. Transferencia del conocimiento
    • 59. Transferencia del conocimiento
    • 60. Transferencia del conocimiento• Proceso dinámico e iterativo• Síntesis, diseminación, intercambio y aplicación ética del conocimiento• Busca mejorar la salud de la población y proveer de productos y servicios más efectivos Canadian Institutes of Health Research
    • 61. ¿Cómo sepuede lograr?
    • 62. Habilidades de MBE
    • 63. Habilidades de MBEAplicarla al lado del paciente
    • 64. Habilidades de MBE Mejora continua de la calidad de la atenciónAplicarla al lado del paciente
    • 65. Habilidades de MBE Mejora continua de la calidad Ayudar, educar e incluir de la atención al paciente en la toma de decisionesAplicarla al lado del paciente
    • 66. P - preguntarI - indagar, buscarL - lectura críticaA - aplicarR - revisar/repasarel proceso
    • 67. Preguntar• Hacer una pregunta es el verdadero paso a la sabiduría• Todos los días nos encontramos con preguntas• Verlas como oportunidades más que como estorbos
    • 68. P I C O Paciente / Intervención / Comparación Outcome / desenlace problema exposición ¿Disminuye la mortalidad? Pacientes con el uso de comparado con no ¿Disminuye el dolorinfarto al miocardio oxígeno administrarlo precordial, ansiedad? ¿Estancia hospitalaria?
    • 69. P I C O Paciente / Intervención / Comparación Outcome / desenlace problema exposición ¿Disminuye la mortalidad? Pacientes con el uso de comparado con no ¿Disminuye el dolorinfarto al miocardio oxígeno administrarlo precordial, ansiedad? ¿Estancia hospitalaria?
    • 70. P I C O Paciente / Intervención / Comparación Outcome / desenlace problema exposición ¿Disminuye la mortalidad? Pacientes con el uso de comparado con no ¿Disminuye el dolorinfarto al miocardio oxígeno administrarlo precordial, ansiedad? ¿Estancia hospitalaria?
    • 71. P I C O Paciente / Intervención / Comparación Outcome / desenlace problema exposición ¿Disminuye la mortalidad? Pacientes con el uso de comparado con no ¿Disminuye el dolorinfarto al miocardio oxígeno administrarlo precordial, ansiedad? ¿Estancia hospitalaria?
    • 72. Indagar
    • 73. No puedoestar aldía entodo
    • 74. Existe sobrecarga de información
    • 75. 75ensayosclínicos&11revisiones
    • 76. el motor de búsquedaSerá tan importante para el clínico como su estetoscopio Paul Glasziou
    • 77. UTILIDAD DE LA Relevancia x ValidezINFORMACIÓ = N Trabajo
    • 78. Sistemas SumariosSinopsis de síntesis SíntesisSinopsis de estudiosEstudios individuales
    • 79. Sistemas SumariosSinopsis de síntesis SíntesisSinopsis de estudiosEstudios individuales
    • 80. Lectura crítica•Validez•Importancia•Aplicabilidad
    • 81. Lectura ¿Está bien hecho el estudio? crítica ...buscar sesgos•Validez•Importancia•Aplicabilidad
    • 82. Lectura ¿Está bien hecho el estudio? crítica ...buscar sesgos ¿Cuáles son los resultados?•Validez•Importancia•Aplicabilidad
    • 83. Lectura ¿Está bien hecho el estudio? crítica ...buscar sesgos ¿Cuáles son los resultados?•Validez ¿Cómo ayudo a•Importancia mis pacientes con esta información?•Aplicabilidad
    • 84. Aplicar y repasar✓Recomendació n final
    • 85. Pero...
    • 86. La MBE agoniza...
    • 87. Sesgo Sesgo de publicación subrogados Desenlaces compuestos Desenlaces Spin Cambio de desenlacePacientes Rollo, sub-grupos, etc.
    • 88. Recomendación
    • 89. evidencia valores y experienciapreferencias Recomendación clínicadel paciente balance balancebeneficio – riesgos beneficio – costos
    • 90. Sesgo Sesgo de publicación subrogados Desenlaces compuestos DesenlacesPreferencias Spin Cambio de desenlacey opinión de pacientes Rollo, sub-grupos, etc.
    • 91. Sesgo de publicación subrogados Desenlaces compuestos DesenlacesPreferencias Spin Cambio de desenlacey opinión de pacientes Rollo, sub-grupos, etc.
    • 92. Sesgo depublicación
    • 93. Sesgo de publicaciónSelección de reporteProbabilidad de reportar resultadoses del doble si el resultado essignificativo Jama 2004;291:2457
    • 94. Sesgo Sesgo de publicación subrogados Desenlaces compuestos Desenlaces Spin Cambio de desenlacePacientes Rollo, sub-grupos, etc.
    • 95. Sesgo Sesgo de publicación subrogados Desenlaces compuestos Desenlaces Spin Cambio de desenlacePacientes Rollo, sub-grupos, etc.
    • 96. subrogados Desenlaces compuestos DesenlacesSpin Cambio de desenlace Rollo, sub-grupos, etc.
    • 97. Irbesartán vs amlodipinaECA 3 años en pacientes diabéticos, hipertensos y con proteinuriaEl tratamiento con Irbesartándisminuyó el desenlace compuestoun 23% comparado con el grupoamlodipina (P=0.006).
    • 98. Irbesartán vs amlodipinaECA 3 años en pacientes diabéticos, hipertensos y con proteinuriaEl tratamiento con Irbesartándisminuyó el desenlace compuestoun 23% comparado con el grupoamlodipina (P=0.006).
    • 99. Irbesartán vs amlodipinaECA 3 años en pacientes diabéticos, hipertensos y con proteinuria • Muerte x cualquier causaEl tratamiento con Irbesartán • Duplicación dedisminuyó el desenlace compuesto niveles de creatinina séricaun 23% comparado con el grupo • Inicio de ESRDamlodipina (P=0.006).
    • 100. TABLE 3. RELATIVE RISKS OF OUTCOMES.* UNADJUSTED RELATIVE RISK P ADJUSTED RELATIVE RISK POUTCOME (95% CI) VALUE (95% CI)† VALUEPrimary composite end point Irbesartan vs. placebo 0.80 (0.66–0.97) 0.02 0.81 (0.67–0.99) 0.03 Amlodipine vs. placebo 1.04 (0.86–1.25) 0.69 1.07 (0.89–1.29) 0.47 Irbesartan vs. amlodipine 0.77 (0.63–0.93) 0.006 0.76 (0.63–0.92) 0.005Doubling of serum creatinine concentration Irbesartan vs. placebo 0.67 (0.52–0.87) 0.003 0.71 (0.54–0.92) 0.009 Amlodipine vs. placebo 1.06 (0.84–1.35) 0.60 1.15 (0.91–1.46) 0.24 Irbesartan vs. amlodipine 0.63 (0.48–0.81) <0.001 0.61 (0.48–0.79) <0.001End-stage renal disease Irbesartan vs. placebo 0.77 (0.57–1.03) 0.07 0.83 (0.62–1.11) 0.19 Amlodipine vs. placebo 1.00 (0.76–1.32) 0.99 1.09 (0.82–1.43) 0.56 Irbesartan vs. amlodipine 0.77 (0.57–1.03) 0.07 0.76 (0.57–1.02) 0.06Death from any cause Irbesartan vs. placebo 0.92 (0.69–1.23) 0.57 0.94 (0.70–1.27) 0.69 Amlodipine vs. placebo 0.88 (0.66–1.19) 0.40 0.90 (0.66–1.21) 0.47 Irbesartan vs. amlodipine 1.04 (0.77–1.40) 0.80 1.05 (0.78–1.42) 0.75Secondary, cardiovascular composite end point Irbesartan vs. placebo 0.91 (0.72–1.14) 0.40 0.91 (0.72–1.14) 0.40 Amlodipine vs. placebo 0.88 (0.69–1.12) 0.29 0.88 (0.69–1.11) 0.27 Irbesartan vs. amlodipine 1.03 (0.81–1.31) 0.79 1.03 (0.81–1.32) 0.78 *CI denotes confidence interval. †The relative risks were adjusted for the mean arterial blood pressure during follow-up.
    • 101. Favorece a amlodipina Favorece a irbesartán 23%Composite (7 a 37) -40% -20% 0 20% 40% 60% 80%
    • 102. Favorece a amlodipina Favorece a irbesartánDoble de 37%Creatinina (19 a 52) ESRD 23% (-3 a 43) 23%Composite (7 a 37) -40% -20% 0 20% 40% 60% 80%
    • 103. Favorece a amlodipina Favorece a irbesartánDoble de 37%Creatinina (19 a 52) ESRD 23% (-3 a 43) Muerte -4% (-40 a 23) 23%Composite (7 a 37) -40% -20% 0 20% 40% 60% 80%
    • 104. OUTCOMESLa importancia de los desenlaces 100 residentes a
    • 105. OUTCOMESLa importancia de los desenlaces 100 residentes a paracaídas placebo
    • 106. OUTCOMESLa importancia de los desenlaces 100 residentes a paracaídas placebo Escala de miedo 36.5 (2.1) 36.7 (1.9) mediana (RIC) Temperatura , grados C 4.3 (1.2) 6.1(1.3) Adrenalina sérica (mcg/dL) 25 (3) 22(2.4)
    • 107. El ejemplo de laecainida y flecainida Pacientes con arritmia •Para todos los post- infartados y evitar arritmias. •Recomendación basada ecainida placebo en estudios cuyo desenlace de interés era la disminución de las arritmias (el ECG se veía “bonito”) Número ↓↓ = de arritmias •Pero, en ensayos clínicos posteriores, se observó que morían más muerte??? ↑↑ = los pacientes del grupo de intervención comparado con el placebo. Epstein AE, et al. JAMA 1993
    • 108. Pacientes con asma severo Óxido Nítrico PlaceboSaturación de O2 FEV1Días de hospital Muerte
    • 109. Mortalidad 9 Crítico para la Mejoría de los síntomas 8 toma de decisiones Efectos adversos 7Desenlaces clínicos Días de estancia hospitalaria 6 Importante, mas 5 no crítico 4 Gasometría arterial 3 FEV 1 2 No importante 1
    • 110. Hay luz al final
    • 111. Investigación adecuada (patrocinios)Manejo de conflicto de interés Desenlaces importantes Registro previo de ECAs Enseñar a detectar sesgo, spins, a ser crítico
    • 112. “No decision about me, without me”
    • 113. Gracias@GiordanoPG sinestetoscopio.com@CharlieNeck cmbe.net