Foot force full presentation idea format

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A presentation for the IDEA World Fitness Conference July 7, 2012 on how to train the proper foot reaction to the ground during exercise.

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Foot force full presentation idea format

  1. 1. Foot Force Reaction: Strong take-offs, safe landings Presented by Charlie Hoolihan, CSCS*D, CES, PES ©2012 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All Rights Reserved.
  2. 2. Feet can be happy, helpful and healthful ©2012 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All Rights Reserved.
  3. 3.  Or unhappy, unhealthy, and unhelpful ©2012 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All Rights Reserved.
  4. 4. Humility First“Where the human body is concerned, we are dealing with a system that is so complex with so many interrelated variables, we can do nothing but be humble in our beliefs and recommendations”Chris Beardsley Strength and Conditioning Review, May 2012 ©2012 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All Rights Reserved.
  5. 5. Goals of this presentation• Increase awareness of foot GRF status• Provide effective tools and tech for client awareness• Help improve bottom up chain reaction response that may reduce injury. • Note – this discussion is a bottom up frame of reference – it is recognized that function (and dysfunction) occurs from the top down as well• What is your current foot awareness. • Static position/walking• Start rolling – M.E.L.T – Sue Hitzmann ©2012 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All Rights Reserved.
  6. 6. Quick anatomy• 24-26 bones – that have complex mechanics• 33 joints – facilitating and supporting complex mechanics• 20 muscles – 12 of which are lower leg muscles that have distal insertions into the foot and cross into the complex foot structures and proximal origins at the knee.• 7000 plus nerves – some of which are major nerves that transmit messages from foot to spine and back• 200,000 nerve endings in the sole of the foot.• All reacting to 2 to 7 x individual body weight in three planes of motion. ©2012 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All Rights Reserved.
  7. 7. Connected by numerous tendons and ligaments to provide the support for movement. ©2012 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All Rights Reserved.
  8. 8. With an interlinking system of nerves to provide proprioceptive feedback to the rest of the neuromuscular system with each footstrike©2012 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All Rights Reserved.
  9. 9. Proprioceptive Reactive signals to the kinetic chain• What does foot strike signal?• Afferent and efferent proprioceptive signals have to at least make it to the spinal cord. ©2012 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All Rights Reserved.
  10. 10. How can we improve this proprioceptive awarenessMonthly or bi-monthly foot-centric sessions.Daily dynamic warm-up components.• Provide effective tools and tech for client awareness• Help improve bottom up chain reaction response that may reduce injury. • Note – this discussion is a bottom up frame of reference – it is recognized that function (and dysfunction) occurs from the top down as well.• Static awareness and walking awareness again. ©2012 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All Rights Reserved.
  11. 11. Movement prep.• Static assessment/walking• Foot circles – re-assess• Calf, Achilles myofacial release – Trigger point therapy – Cassidy Phillips• Calf stretch• Ankle squats – DL and SL• Cats and dogs with arches – medial, lateral, mid.• Hip mobilizers with foot awareness. ©2012 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All Rights Reserved.
  12. 12. Step by step• Segment by segment walking patterns. Heels, H-Ball, HB-Toe, HBT-calf, HBTC-hamstring, HBTCH-Glute, small skips (notice acceleration and deceleration patterns), big bounding skips, glute walks.• Running patterns – springs not brakes • Napoleon Dynamite drill (calf running) • Butt kicks • Forward lean from foot springs• Foot strike moves up the foot relative to speed. ©2012 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All Rights Reserved.
  13. 13. Step by step• Overt multi-planar patterning – do a progression. • Lateral shuffles – foot stays in frontal plane • Carioca – pivots w hips following feet or vice versa • Side running ©2012 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All Rights Reserved.
  14. 14. Complex connectivity and movement of all the parts ©2012 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All Rights Reserved.
  15. 15. Miraculous and brilliant design toaccommodate tri-plane motion stimulous ©2012 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All Rights Reserved.
  16. 16. It’s all in how they’re taught or forced to behave. ©2012 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All Rights Reserved.
  17. 17. Do the feet move symmetrically, or are there different forces acting on each foot. ©2012 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All Rights Reserved.
  18. 18. Dorsiflexion, Plantarflexion, abduction, adduction and torque. ©2012 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All Rights Reserved.
  19. 19. Heel strike initiates the chain and the Subtalor joint rocks and rolls mechanics ©2012 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All Rights Reserved.
  20. 20. In walking, lateral heel strike initiates the process so bones and muscles can react up the kinetic chain. ©2012 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All Rights Reserved.
  21. 21. Pronation, Supination & Rotation ©2012 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All Rights Reserved.
  22. 22. As the foot heads towards mid-stance, medialmovement begins to initiate metatarsal stability at mid-footSo propulsive forces can be initiated through the big-toe catapult from dorsiflexion to plantarflexion ©2012 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All Rights Reserved.
  23. 23. Biomechanical considerations• Lack of foot mobility is a source of injury in lower extremity and beyond.• Limited dorsiflexion is one of those sources.• Locked in eversion – calves bailing early and bi-passing the butt, medial extensors and power catapult .• Torque chain reaction of winding and unwinding starts and ends• Sprinters medial muscles – plantar flexors and medial knee extensors are stronger and thicker. Tendons of extensors are more compliant and thicker ©2012 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All Rights Reserved.
  24. 24. Various running speeds moves thesediagonal mechanics further up the foot to mid or fore foot. (left foot below) ©2012 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All Rights Reserved.
  25. 25. This process stimulates complex muscle activity Muscle Heel Strike Mid-stance Heel off 1. Decelerates 1. Concentric 1. Concentric Dorsiflexion. plantarflexion Calf tibial external 2.Decelerates and tibial rotation. tibial internal external rotation. rotation. 1. Decelerates 1.Decelerates 1. Concentric hip hip flexion. hip adduction. extension. Hamstrings 2.Stabilizes pelvis 2. Decelerates 2. Knee external 3.Concentric knee knee and hip rotation external rot. internal rotation 1. Concentric hip 1. Decelerates 1. Decelerates extension. hip flexion. hip adduction 2. Frontal plane Gluteals 2.Stabilizes pelvis and internal control of pelvis. . rotation 3.Accelerates hip abduction 1.Declerates 1.Declerates femoral external 1. Decelerates femoral internal rotation. Adductors femoral external rotation and 2.Helps to rotation external rotation. control frontal "Stabilization" plane loading in ©2012 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All Rights Reserved.
  26. 26. Linked systems working together in complex movement ©2012 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All Rights Reserved.
  27. 27. And muscles are all linked systems• Color of Text ©2012 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All Rights Reserved.
  28. 28. Posterior accelerates Anterior Decelerates ©2012 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All Rights Reserved.
  29. 29. Rotation and deep support. These groups, especially deep muscle groups, are most often under-trained; ©2012 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All Rights Reserved.
  30. 30. A myriad of pathways to proper – afferent and efferent signalling ©2012 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All Rights Reserved.
  31. 31. Foot placement initiates proper or improper chain reaction mechanics.Supination or lateral foot dominance creates external rotation. Over-pronation or medial dominance, internal rotation. ©2012 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All Rights Reserved.
  32. 32. Loss of neutral foot cascades up the chain and eliminates movement and muscle activity. ©2012 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All Rights Reserved.
  33. 33. Knee and foot• Color of Text alignment are critical to long term health. Squats/lunges with proper alignment develop strength and joint health. Squats that are performed for pure strength may develop a need for knee/hip replacements. Lunges and step-ups without alignment can create a host of joint issues. ©2012 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All Rights Reserved.
  34. 34. More issuesWrong kind up of torque the chain ©2012 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All Rights Reserved.
  35. 35. All this is bad newsBut preventable with return to neutral foot. ©2012 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All Rights Reserved.
  36. 36. We have to teach athletes and clients toinitiate biomechanics with feet that react diagonally down the whole foot. ©2012 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All Rights Reserved.
  37. 37. Even when society influences otherwise.Flat feet/overpronation are influenced by seated posture and vice versa. Forward lean crashes into the arch. ©2012 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All Rights Reserved.
  38. 38. Let’s not get started on high heels…But. ©2012 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All Rights Reserved.
  39. 39. This knee and ankle are not collapsing into a massive explosion of tendons and ligaments because of foot awareness. The movement actually follows the rules of foot force chain reaction. ©2012 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All Rights Reserved.
  40. 40. We create foot awareness with training to undoyears of improper biomechanics with –• Tissue release• Stretching – post exercise dorsiflexion• Corrective and Reactive exercise• Kinesthetic awareness drills• Stabilizing and strengthening exercises• Foot proprioception – use those 200,000 nerve endings. ©2012 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All Rights Reserved.
  41. 41. Tissue release – fascia• Foot rolls – bouncy ball/yamuna foot wakers• Calf and ankle rollsStretching• Plantar and Dorsiflexion – most feet do not achieve optimal ROMs in either.• Calf stretch, heel drops and plantar stretching.• Frontal plane mobilityCorrective Dynamic warm-up exercise• Foot circles & internal/external rotators of the whole leg.• Bands for plantar/dorsiflexion and abduction/adduction.• Series of lunges that mimic the forces driving the foot. ©2012 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All Rights Reserved.
  42. 42. Kinesthetic awareness drills• Movement prep with isolated foot movements all in neutral – shin, Achilles and plantar fasica therapy• Heel walk, heel-foot walk, heel-foot-toe walk• Heel-foot-toe-calf walk, toe-calf walk. Skips.• Frontal plane and transverse plane motions • Slow deliberate movements to gain kinesthetic feel for the medial to lateral movement of each foot.Stabilizing and strengthening• Springs, and spring strides.• Eccentric loading with strength and light plyo • TRX or suspension jumps ©2012 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All Rights Reserved.
  43. 43. . Proprioception training: how doesfoot affect other muscles and vice versa• Single leg exercises w awareness of neutral foot squat, deadlift, frontal plane taps.• Single leg exercises with external demand w foot awareness. • Single arm oblique movements on single leg • Waist tether movements• Frontal plane movements w stabilization.Balance exercises – stress react and return to neutral feet Stress this especially on unstable surfaces like Bosu, wobble board or airex.Barefoot/Natural/Pose/Chi running style ©2012 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All Rights Reserved.
  44. 44. Natural running on front of foot ©2012 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All Rights Reserved.
  45. 45. Learn to take advantage of gravity,eccentric loading’s,elasticity, energy storage and release ©2012 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All Rights Reserved.
  46. 46. At any speed Sprinters and the best endurance runners are mid to forefoot strikers. But its because they’re fast! Comfortable fast running ©2012 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All Rights Reserved.
  47. 47. Different speeds, similar strides ©2012 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All Rights Reserved.
  48. 48. Barefoot running ©2012 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All Rights Reserved.
  49. 49. In theory and research it is good But there are too many variables –Research example on right is a child used to running barefootwho put on shoes not vice versa.Lot of promising early research but more advocates thanacademics at this point. ©2012 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All Rights Reserved.
  50. 50. Depends on the surface. ©2012 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All Rights Reserved.
  51. 51. Depends on the footalignment and force reactions ©2012 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All Rights Reserved.
  52. 52. Depends on the foot• Age – as we get older, restrictions increase shod or unshod. Mostly because of sedentary society.• Size. Kenyans and Tarahumara Indians 5-3/130 lbs• Foot mechanics and previous injury history.• Occupation and environment.• Any others? ©2012 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All Rights Reserved.
  53. 53. Practical guidelines• Most everyone should do some barefoot training on soft surfaces because it does help increase proprioception and increase foot strength. • Sand running – shod and unshod – torque awareness• Individual biomechanics and history of injury dictate the goal amount.• It should be periodized w 10% per week rule. • And limited or reduced with any early warning signals• It can reduce and produce injury. ©2012 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All Rights Reserved.
  54. 54. Jumping©2012 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All Rights Reserved.
  55. 55. Aligned Athletic Landings ©2012 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All Rights Reserved.
  56. 56. Use the foot to stimulate the thewhole body to absorb force of landing ©2012 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All Rights Reserved.
  57. 57. Appropriate training goals andtechniques• What are the goals of the jumps • Fitness – do it right – there are no risks/all rewards • Athletes have risks for reward but land in sand pit or soft surface. Once! And have daily/weekly jump counts. ©2012 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All Rights Reserved.
  58. 58. Jump landing training• Take off is concentric strength which is good.• Landing is eccentric loading which can be good if decelerated properly. Bad if decelerated improperly• Feet help alert the rest of the body to decelerate. • Train the Pre activation potentiation with soft landing and quiet drills • Progressive heights w key check points for joint alignment. ©2012 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All Rights Reserved.
  59. 59. Not a science but its out there ©2012 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All Rights Reserved.
  60. 60. The end is the beginning ©2012 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All Rights Reserved.
  61. 61. Primary resources• Gray Institute Functional video digest • Foot, Foot FMR, Calf, Walking, Running, jumping• Pose Running – Nicholas Romanov.• Anthony Carey/Justin Price/Egoscue method• Triggerpoint Therapy – Cassidy Phillips• M.E.L.T. – Sue Hitzmann• Strength and Conditioning reviews – Bret Conteras/ Chris Beardsly• Track and Field observations - Olympics• Slideshare.com ©2012 IDEA Health & Fitness Association. All Rights Reserved.

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