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Offthe shelfe bookforacademiclibrarians

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  • 1. Off-the-Shelf E-Book Platforms for Academic Libraries Audrey Powers Pre-conference Organizer
  • 2. Introductions & Overview • • • • • Technical Aspects & Business Models Lending Platforms Aggregator Platforms Commercial Publisher Platforms University Press Platforms
  • 3. E-Books: Too Much Is Not Enough Trey Shelton Amy Buhler Tara Cataldo
  • 4. Audience Participation Choose your poison • to 37607 • @poll_______ • via PollEv.com
  • 5. LAY OF THE LAND http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Texel_Landscape.jpg
  • 6. DRM Grade A B C D Definition Grades of 36 E-Book Platforms • Chapters/sections and/or whole book can be printed/downloaded with no restrictions D • A+ for No 11% interlibrary loan restrictions • Chapters/sections can be printed/downloaded with some restrictions • C Multiuser accessible • 22% Interlibrary loan restricted A What is it? • Print restrictions of 21-60 pages or segments 53% • Single user access/Multiuser access disabled when whole book is checked out B • Interlibrary loan restricted 14% • Print restrictions of 20 pages or less • No downloading • Single user access only • Interlibrary loan restricted
  • 7. Format Options HTML EPUB3 PDF
  • 8. Aggregator vs. Publisher Aggregators Publishers Pro Pro Single interface One Point of Contact One license Con Con More restrictive DRM Multiple licenses contracts Differing publisher One vendor No/less restrictive DRM Loss of content Multiple addendums One Point of Contact Price Multiple licensing models Price Multiple interfaces More user features Mediated acquisitions One-time purchase Subscription based access
  • 9. Business Models • Perpetual vs. subscribed • Package vs. title-by-title • License Models • Patron/Demand Driven Acquisitions
  • 10. USER FEATURES http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Student_in_the_library,_1981.jpg http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Student_in_the_library,_1981_%282%29.jpg
  • 11. User Features Checklist Full-text searching Highlights search terms Create bookshelf Create bookmarks and notes Print notes Automatic citations Mobile accessibility Printing/Downloading Whole book downloading/loans
  • 12. User Features: Access • Browser compatibility • Mobile access • Accessibility features
  • 13. • Searching • User Features: Bookshelves Searching & Interactive Tools • Bookmarks • Notes • Citing • Printing/downloading
  • 14. ADMIN FEATURES http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Librarian_accessing_pdq.jpg
  • 15. Admin Features Checklist Acquistitions & PDA Management Admin Alerts Authentication Method Management Institutional Branding Manage Download/Loan Period Manage User Accounts (free) MARC Records Correct & Current KB Metadata Discovery Service Indexing Usage Reports Title Lists
  • 16. Admin Features: Acquisitions • Selecting and Ordering Titles • Managing PDA • Turning Alerts On & Off
  • 17. Admin Features: Platform Customization • Authentication Methods • Institutional Branding • Loan periods • Patron accounts
  • 18. Admin Features: Access & Discoverability • MARC • ERM/Link Resolver Knowledge Base • Discovery Services
  • 19. Admin Features: Getting Data • Usage Reports • Title Lists • Patron Data
  • 20. Ideal E-Book Platform http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:EBook_between_paper_books.jpg#file
  • 21. Contact Info • Trey Shelton tshelton@ufl.edu • Amy Buhler abuhler@ufl.edu • Tara Cataldo ttobin@ufl.edu
  • 22. E-Book Lending Platforms John Novak UNLV Libraries john.novak@unlv.edu
  • 23. Outline of Presentation • What is an E-Book lending platform? • Detail major E-Book lending platforms for academic libraries • Issues and challenges • Why/how academic library would license one • What the future holds
  • 24. What is an E-Book lending platform? • E-Books from multiple publishers one can check out • Dealing with an aggregator, not a publisher Photo from flickr by fishbrain.randy@sbcglobal.net
  • 25. Characteristics of E-Book LPs • • • • • Read in a variety of electronic environments Offline versions DRM One book, one user model Options for libraries (limit check outs, hold queues, multiple copies) • Marc Records provided at cost
  • 26. Further Characteristics • Popular and user-friendly • Assistive screen reader technologies • Blurred lines – similarities to aggregators – Multiple publishers – Mobile devices platforms – Exploring checkout-based distribution systems
  • 27. Big Six/Five Publishers • State Library of Kansas FB page – https://www.facebook.com/thebig6ebooks
  • 28. E-Book LP Players
  • 29. Axis 360 • Baker & Taylor • Content: Over 400,000 E-Books • Won accessibility award from National Federation for the Blind. • Mobile Apps: Blio/Axis Reader • Formats: PDF, epub, .xps (Blio) • Other digital media – contains audiobooks, working towards video and music.
  • 30. 3M Cloud Library • Cloud based delivery of content. Allows library to transfer their E-Book license to new platform. • Content: Over 300,000 E-Books • Format: PDF, epub • Reader: 3M Cloud Library app • Other digital media: none
  • 31. Freading • • • • • Pay-per-use system Content: 50,000 E-Books Format: PDF, epub Reader: Freading app Multimedia: Related to Freegal Music and Freegal Movies and Television
  • 32. Overdrive • One of the first E-Book lending platforms, largest number of academic library customers • Content: More than 1 million ebooks • Formats: ePub, PDF, Kindle (only one) • Reader: Overdrive Media Console • Multimedia: Audiobooks, Music, Videos
  • 33. LexisNexis Digital Library • Working with legal community for decades • Partnered with Overdrive to provide customized legal content • Content: 1,800 LN titles, plus access to Overdrive catalog • Further blurring the lines between aggregator and E-Book LP
  • 34. Challenges and Issues • Leased E-Book model – Preservation of cultural heritage in question – ILL difficult – DRM has access issues • Patron preference – Not all books available in their preferred format or ereader – E-book content • Lack of leverage to negotiate • Pricing
  • 35. Pricing Continued • Douglas County Library in Colorado – Publishing monthly reports comparing E-Book prices from Overdrive and 3M with amazon.com costs – Difference of $32.35 per book – http://www.americanlibrariesmagazine.org/sites/ame ricanlibrariesmagazine.org/files/DCLPriceReportSept1 2.pdf
  • 36. E-Book LPs limitations • • • • Printing limited, if available at all New technology = more training Content popular, but limited To avoid duplication of content, takes a lot of work with your print book vendor • Lending platforms not cross-searchable • Public and alumni access – can be set by library, but at a cost
  • 37. E-Book LPs in Academic Libraries • Support leisure, popular reading collection. Analogous to McNaughton plans • Substitute E-Book reader lending programs – Easier to maintain – Cost-effective • Support juvenile literature program • Audiobooks/Streaming Video
  • 38. Criteria for Choosing an E-Book LP • • • • • Content and availability Administrative and hosting fees API integration E-reader apps Exhaustive list of criteria: Mirela Roncevic’s EBook Platforms for Libraries
  • 39. The Future • Public Libraries • Advocacy Groups – ALA’s Digital Content Working Group – ReadersFirst • Douglas County Library model – Library as distributor and publisher – OdiloTID – Califa, Enki • LexisNexis model, other business models • Big Six Publishers
  • 40. Bibliography • Blogs & Websites – The Digital Reader (blog): http://www.the-digital-reader.com/ – No Shelf Required (blog): http://www.libraries.wright.edu/noshelfrequired/ – “Digital Content Working Group: Charge.”ala.org. Accessed July 3, 2013. http://www.ala.org/groups/committees/special/ala-dcwg – “ReadersFirst.” ReadersFirst.org. http://readersfirst.org/ – State Library of Kansas. The Big 6 – eBooks in Libraries. https://www.facebook.com/thebig6ebooks • Readings – Douglas County Libraries. “Douglas County Libraries Report: Pricing Comparison as of July 1 2013.” Last modified July 1, 2013. http://evoke.cvlsites.org/files/2013/07/DCL-PricingComparison-7-1-13.pdf – Roncevic, Mirela. E-book Platforms for Libraries. Library Technology Reports 49, no. 3, (Chicago: ALA TechSource, 2013). – Thomas, Lisa Carlucci. “Making Sense of Change: E-books, Access and the Academic Library.” No Shelf Required 2: Use and Management of Electronic Books. Edited by Sue Polanka (Chicago: American Library Association, 2012), 61-70.
  • 41. Thank You! John Novak john.novak@unlv.edu
  • 42. E-Book Aggregator Platforms Charleston Conference November 6, 2013 Deborah Lenares Wellesley College
  • 43. Overview • • • • • • • Aggregators: definition, players History Business models Publisher relations Benefits and challenges When is an aggregator the right choice? How to choose an aggregator
  • 44. Definition • E-Book provider that offers books from multiple publishers
  • 45. Other aggregators • Reference • Computing, Business, Engineering • Small general collections • Others
  • 46. History 1971 1999 2001 2004 2010 2013
  • 47. Business models • • • • Subscription collections Purchased collections Title level purchasing Patron driven acquisition
  • 48. Publisher relations • Benefits and challenges for publishers • Balancing conflicting expectations • Trends in publisher relationships
  • 49. Benefits and challenges Challenges • More restrictive DRM • Duplication • Management of customized collections • Portico LOCKSS Benefits • Purchasing options • Unified platform • Format availability • Simplified management • Not in Portico, LOCKSS
  • 50. When is an aggregator the right choice? • Preferred business model • Preferred platform • Preferred DRM
  • 51. How to choose an aggregator • • • • • Define your priorities Compare the catalogs Test the usability of the platforms Look for integration with your current systems Comparison spreadsheet http://tinyurl.com/ebookaggregators
  • 52. Thank You!
  • 53. Commercial Publisher E-Book Platforms Cris Ferguson cferguson13@murraystate.edu Murray State University Libraries
  • 54. Defining Commercial Publishers • E-Book provider whose platform contains primarily its own published content • Does not include University Presses or publishers that host third-party content Gale o Safari o Roncevic, Mirela. 2013. “E-book Platforms for Libraries.” Library Technology Reports 49, no. 3: 1-44.
  • 55. Commercial Publishers
  • 56. Benefits and Challenges • Multiple users per book • Downloads do not expire • MARC records often provided • More favorable pricing • Each publisher has its own platform • Multiple license agreements • Quality of MARC records
  • 57. Assessing Commercial Publisher Platforms Content is King Usability is Queen / Daniel Waisberg / CC BY-NC-SA
  • 58. Platform Content • Number of titles available • Subject areas covered • Embargo on publication of electronic version
  • 59. Number of Titles 140,000 Publication Embargo Print and eBooks are released around the same time. 388 Reference Titles, eBooks are released 6 2377 Monographs weeks after the print. 40,000 Print released first. eBook released within a year of the print. 11,800 eBooks are generally available before the print is released.
  • 60. Platform Functionality • In what ways, if any, does the platform utilize DRM restrictions? Used with permission.
  • 61. Platform Functionality •To what degree is the E-Book content compatibile with eReaders, tablets, other devices? Used with permission.
  • 62. Single, Crosssearchable platform? Full Downlo eBook ad to downloa d? device?
  • 63. Pricing Models • • • • Title-by-title purchase Purchase of titles in collections / packages Subscriptions to packages Demand-Driven Acquisition (DDA, PDA)
  • 64. Package Pricing Considerations • What is the average cost per title? • How are the titles grouped into collections? • Year of publication • Subject • How much duplication is there with print? • How many titles will actually be used?
  • 65. DDA: Elsevier’s Evidence-Based Selection • Pay an up-front fee to gain access to a wide range of E-Books on ScienceDirect for 12 months • After 12 months, you pick which titles to keep • Decisions about which E-Books to acquire are upon actual use of titles Chan, Gayle. 2012. “A sustainable e-book purchase model: A successful partnership.” Library Connect 10, no. 2: 5. http://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/articles/assessmentsoutcomes/2012-07/sustainable-e-book-purchase-model.
  • 66. Interactive Content: the Jove Model • Visualized experiments • Peer-reviewed content • In-house production
  • 67. Setting the bar: Children’s E-Books
  • 68. Interactive Academic E-Books • Primarily textbooks • Incorporate video and audio
  • 69. Challenges of Interactivity • How do we ensure compatibility across devices and platforms? • Will special software be necessary? • Who is responsible for the creation and curation of interactive content? • How will interactive content affect pricing? • What about DRM?
  • 70. The Future of (Academic?) E-Books Al Gore’s Our Choice, published by Push Pop Press http://pushpoppress.com/ourchoice/
  • 71. •Questions? •Comments? Cris Ferguson Director of Technical Services Murray State University Libraries cferguson13@murraystate.edu
  • 72. University Press eBook Platforms • Project MUSE – Johns Hopkins University Press • University Press Scholarship Online – Oxford University Press • JSTOR eBooks – Ithaka • University Publishing Online – Cambridge University Press • BiblioVault – University of Chicago Press • eDuke Books Scholarly Collection – Duke University Press
  • 73. Project MUSE • http://muse.jhu.edu • Founded in 1995 • Launched ebooks in 2012 • Hosts over 20,000 books on behalf of the University Press Content Consortia • 292,060 articles and 591,370 chapters by 206 publishers
  • 74. Project MUSE • Very clean faceted search • Filter results by – – – – – – – – Access Content type Research area Author Publisher Journal Language Date range
  • 75. Project MUSE • Clean book landing page • TOC with chapter summaries • Search full text within the book • Book metadata • Citation formatting pop-up • Related content recommendations
  • 76. University Press Scholarship Online • http://www.universitypressscholarship.com • Oxford University Press founded in 1586 • Launched ebooks in 2003 (Oxford Scholarship Online) • Hosts 14,000 books on behalf of 14 university press publishers
  • 77. University Press Scholarship Online • Browse by subject emphasis • Search Results filtered by – – – – – Publisher Subject collection Access Recency Date range • Search within results • Pop-up summaries including key words
  • 78. University Press Scholarship Online • Clean book landing page • University Press publisher branding • TOC with chapter summaries, adjustable display • Search full text within the book • Search across all OUP content via Oxford Index
  • 79. JSTOR Books • http://books.jsto r.org • Founded in 1995 • Launched ebooks in 2012 • Hosts over 15,000 books on behalf of 30 university press publishers
  • 80. JSTOR Books • Search across books and journals • Tabbed filtering by content type • Sort by relevance or date (old to new/new to old) • Search within current results • Citation management export & alerting
  • 81. JSTOR Books • Clean book landing page • Citation tools • TOC with chapter summaries • OpenURL linking
  • 82. University Publishing Online • http://universitypublishingonline.org
  • 83. Cambridge Books Online • Clean book landing page • Search term highlighting • Chapter level summaries available • PDF contents • Citation tools & alerts
  • 84. BiblioVault • http://www.bibliovault.org • University of Chicago Press • Repository storing files & metadata • 30,000+ books on behalf of 90+ university press publishers • B to B (Not B to C)
  • 85. eDuke Books Scholarly Collection • http://read.dukeupre ss.edu/ • Integrated across 40 journals and 1500+ books • Emphasis on the Reader & ease of use
  • 86. Observations • University Press platforms are young – Designs still evolving – Content format varies widely, from PDF, XML, ePub and reader formats • Most $$ still comes from print sales • Amazon is still the single biggest sales channel • eBook hosting platforms are often viewed as sales channels, the more availability the better – Leads to books being available on multiple platforms – Creates challenges for Librarians, who may not want to purchase the same books from several different collections • Integrated content (books with journals) creates greater utility for the Reader
  • 87. Please stay to meet the presenters

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