Collection development policies for the 21st century academic library
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Collection development policies for the 21st century academic library

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Daniel C. Mack (speaker), Steve Allerman (speaker)

Daniel C. Mack (speaker), Steve Allerman (speaker)

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    Collection development policies for the 21st century academic library Collection development policies for the 21st century academic library Presentation Transcript

    • Collection Development Policies for the 21st Century Academic Library: Creating a New Model Steve Alleman Head of Collections, University of Missouri-Kansas City Daniel C. Mack Interim Director, Collection Management and Special Collections, University of Maryland
    • DOES EVERY LIBRARY NEED A COLLECTION DEVELOPMENT POLICY?
    • Guide for Written Collection Policy Statements, 2d ed., ALCTS Collection Management and Development Guides #7 Joanne S. Anderson, ed., (Chicago: ALA Editions, 1996) 36p.
    • RUSA Standards & Guidelines Committee Responsible for advising the RUSA Board of Directors on standards and guidelines for the delivery of reference information services and of general library services and materials to adults. “A guideline serves as an authoritative document offering suggested levels of performance or adequacy. It can outline a recommended course of action. Unlike standards that carry the weight of a rule, guidelines describe measures to help libraries meet the requirements of a standard. The Bylaws of the American Library Association permit only type-of-library divisions to adopt standards. RUSA, as a type-of-activity division, is restricted to writing guidelines. The RUSA Standards and Guidelines Committee coordinates the development of all guidelines written within RUSA.”
    • Reference and User Services Guidelines by Topic (http://www.ala.org/rusa/resources/guidelines) Collection Development • Guidelines for Liaison Work in Managing Collections and Services (2010) • Guidelines for Preparation of a Bibliography (2010) Electronic Services • Guidelines for the Introduction of Electronic Information Resources to Users (2006) • Guidelines for Implementing and Maintaining Virtual Reference Services (2010) Genealogy, History • Guidelines for a Unit or Course of Instruction in Genealogical Research at Schools of Library and Information Science (2007) • Guidelines for Developing a Core Genealogy Collection (2007) • Guidelines for Establishing Local History Collections (2012) • Information Literacy Guidelines and Competencies for Undergraduate History Students (2013) Information Literacy • Information Literacy Guidelines and Competencies for Undergraduate History Students (2013) Interlibrary Loan • Guidelines for Interlibrary Loan Operations Management (2012) • Interlibrary Loan Code for the United States (2008) Interlibrary Loan Code for the United States Explanatory Supplement • Guidelines for Resource-Sharing Response to Natural and Man-made Disasters (July 2010) Reference/Information Services • New Definition of Reference (2008) • Guidelines for Behavioral Performance of Reference and Information Service Providers (2013) • Guidelines for Business Information Responses (2013) • Guidelines for Cooperative Reference Services (2006) • Guidelines for Implementing and Maintaining Virtual Reference Services (2010) • Guidelines for Information Services (2000) • Guidelines for Medical, Legal, and Business Responses (2001) • Professional Competencies for Reference and User Services Librarians (2003) User Populations • Guidelines for the Development and Promotion of Multilingual Collections and Services (2007) • Guidelines for Library Services to Older Adults (2008) • Guidelines for Library Services to Spanish-Speaking Library Users (2007) • Guidelines for Library Services to Teens (2007)
    • Guideline for writing guidelines: http://www.ala.org/rusa/about/policies/developingguidelines/4developingguidelin es 1.0 Format • 1.1 The format of the guidelines should follow those recommended in the ALA Standards Manual. • 1.2 Number the sections in sequential order, with secondary ideas listed under general statements. • 1.3 Each numbered section may have a header with a statement or paragraph(s) underneath, or may have a main section header with a numbered statement/paragraph underneath. • 1.4 Avoid detail beyond three numbered divisions (e.g. 1.1.2) to prevent making the document cumbersome and difficult to follow. 2.0 Content • 2.1 An RUSA guideline should incorporate benchmarks or yardsticks by which a particular library or information service, resources, or material may be judged. • 2.2 Include in an appendix, procedures that describe methods to achieve a benchmark or guideline statement. These procedures may also be referred to as separately-published documents. 3.0 Style • 3.1 Use short, declarative sentences. Avoid lengthy descriptive phrases. Avoid passive voice whenever possible…………
    • Collection Development Policy Outline I. Introduction a. Purpose of the policy b. Audience to whom the policy is directed c. The institution served and its mission statement d. Clientele e. Intellectual freedom and copyright statements II. Overview of the collection a. History of the collection b. Broad subject areas emphasized or deemphasized c. Locations III.Organization of the collection management program a. Budget and allocation policy b. Staffing and assigned responsibilities c. Preservation and storage d. Replacement and deselection e. Cooperative agreements
    • IV. Collection development a. Types of publications i. Books ii.Periodicals iii.Textbooks iv.Microforms v.Audio-visual materials vi.Electronic formats b. Local history and special collections c. Children’s materials d. Languages e. Popular vs. scholarly f. g. h. i. j. k. Fiction and non-fiction Multiple copies Reference and reserve Government publications Access vs. ownership Acquisition procedures affecting collection policies i. Standing orders ii. Approval plans and blanket orders iii. Gifts and exchanges
    • V. Detailed analysis of subject collections a. Conspectus approach b. Narrative approach – for each subject area: i. Clientele ii. Scope (language, geography, chronology, etc.) iii.Types of material iv.Subjects covered and collection levels v. Responsibility for the subject vi.Interdisciplinary relationships vii.Local or regional resources
    • V. Detailed analysis of subject collections a.Conspectus approach b.Narrative approach – for each subject area: i. Clientele ii.Scope (language, geography, chronology, etc.) iii.Types of material iv.Subjects covered and collection levels v.Responsibility for the subject vi.Interdisciplinary relationships vii.Local or regional resources
    • Is this the right approach st century academic library? for the 21
    • New areas of policy to consider • • • • Content New modes of publishing and delivery Technical issues Other issues There are no neat boundaries between these areas
    • Changing content issues • • • • • • Interdisciplinarity Internationalization and global issues Diversity Big Science Digital Humanities Who is responsible for content decisions?
    • New modes of publishing and delivery • Demand driven acquisition / patron driven acquisition / user initiated acquisition • Access vs. ownership • Just in time vs. just in case • Open access • Peer-to-peer publishing • Social media
    • Technical issues • • • • • • Data curation Data and text mining Research data Born digital content Embargoes and restrictions of access Platform-agnostic functionality
    • Other issues • • • • Space Assessment Services Consortia, partners and collaborative collection development • Who are the experts?
    • Questions or comments? Contact us: Steve Alleman: allemans@umkc.edu Dan Mack: dmack@umd.edu