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Revisiting Plato’s Cave
Bruce Heterick
Vice President
JSTOR | Portico
November 8,2013

Image via Google
Contributors:
• Jenny Walker, independent consultant
• Teddy Hein, analytics coordinator, JSTOR
• Ross Houseright, senior ...
Origin of Content Accesses in JSTOR

0%
Serials
Solutions
5%

Self Referrer
15%
Direct to JSTOR
33%
Linking Partners, etc....
Origin of Content Accesses in JSTOR

0%
Serials
Solutions
5%

Self Referrer
15%
Direct to JSTOR
33%
Linking Partners, etc....
Origin of Content Accesses in JSTOR

0%
Serials
Solutions
5%

Self Referrer
15%
Direct to JSTOR
33%
Linking Partners, etc....
Origin of Content Accesses in JSTOR

0%
Serials
Solutions
5%

Self Referrer
15%
Direct to JSTOR
33%
Linking Partners, etc....
2011 Usage – JSTOR Small

30,000

25,000

20,000

15,000

10,000

2011 JR1a

5,000

0

COUNTER Journal Report 1a (JR1a) co...
2012 Usage – JSTOR Small

30,000

% Change from
2011 to 2012

25,000

-24.72%

20,000

15,000
2011 JR1a
10,000
2012 JR1a
5...
2013 Usage (YTD) – JSTOR Small

30,000

25,000

20,000

15,000
2011 JR1a
10,000

2012 JR1a
2013 JR1a

5,000

0

COUNTER Jo...
Getting Good Data … Is Hard
• Survey of JSTOR participating institutions (May 2013)
o 422 responses
o No consistent implem...
Getting Good Data … Is Expensive
• Supplemented with data from lib-web-cats database
(Marshall Breeding)
o Increased # of ...
Getting Good Data … Requires Negotiation
• Worked directly with EBSCO, Ex Libris, OCLC, and ProQuest to
get customer list ...
Caveat Emptor
Paraphrasing the late Prof. Aaron Levenstein (Baruch)

Statistics are like bathing suits …
What they reveal ...
Initial Usage Results: U.S. higher education
• Culled customer lists to JSTOR participants in U.S. higher
education for ED...
Initial Usage Results: Worldwide higher education
• Culled customer lists to JSTOR participants worldwide for
EDS (EBSCO),...
Initial Usage Results: U.S. higher education
• There are significant differences by JSTOR Class within
each discovery serv...
Initial Usage Results: Worldwide higher education
• There are significant differences by JSTOR Class within
each discovery...
Deep-dive into discovery partners
• Subject metadata matters … a lot
o Relevancy ranking is driven by subject metadata
o S...
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Revisiting Plato's Cave, Bruce Heterick, JSTOR

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2013 Charleston Conference, 11-8-13

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  • is an allegory used by the GreekphilosopherPlato in his work The Republic to illustrate "our nature in its education and want of education“. It is written as a fictional dialogue between Plato's teacher Socrates and Plato's brother Glaucon.Plato lets Socrates describe a group of people who have lived chained to the wall of a cave all of their lives, facing a blank wall. The people watch shadows projected on the wall by things passing in front of a fire behind them, and begin to ascribe forms to these shadows. According to Plato's Socrates, the shadows are as close as the prisoners get to viewing reality. He then explains how the philosopher is like a prisoner who is freed from the cave and comes to understand that the shadows on the wall do not make up reality at all, as he can perceive the true form of reality rather than the mere shadows seen by the prisoners.Applying this analogy to the discovery space, I think many resource providers – and probably more than a few librarians – feel like those prisoners chained to the cave looking at the shadows on the wall (the claims of the wonderfulness of web-scale discovery) and viewing that as reality. Is it reality? I’m not entirely sure … so, we need to begin shedding some light on what is ACTUALLY happening (from a usage perspective) so that we can begin to make better determinations about what is real and what might be imagined.
  • Transcript of "Revisiting Plato's Cave, Bruce Heterick, JSTOR"

    1. 1. Revisiting Plato’s Cave Bruce Heterick Vice President JSTOR | Portico November 8,2013 Image via Google
    2. 2. Contributors: • Jenny Walker, independent consultant • Teddy Hein, analytics coordinator, JSTOR • Ross Houseright, senior data analyst, JSTOR
    3. 3. Origin of Content Accesses in JSTOR 0% Serials Solutions 5% Self Referrer 15% Direct to JSTOR 33% Linking Partners, etc. 13% Institution 11% Google 13% Google Scholar 11%
    4. 4. Origin of Content Accesses in JSTOR 0% Serials Solutions 5% Self Referrer 15% Direct to JSTOR 33% Linking Partners, etc. 13% Institution 11% Google 13% Google Scholar 11%
    5. 5. Origin of Content Accesses in JSTOR 0% Serials Solutions 5% Self Referrer 15% Direct to JSTOR 33% Linking Partners, etc. 13% Institution 11% Google 13% Google Scholar 11%
    6. 6. Origin of Content Accesses in JSTOR 0% Serials Solutions 5% Self Referrer 15% Direct to JSTOR 33% Linking Partners, etc. 13% Institution 11% Google 13% Google Scholar 11%
    7. 7. 2011 Usage – JSTOR Small 30,000 25,000 20,000 15,000 10,000 2011 JR1a 5,000 0 COUNTER Journal Report 1a (JR1a) counts the number of successful full-text article requests by month and journal from an archive. The metrics that drive into this are Article Views and PDF downloads, excluding Article Views and PDF Downloads of the same item in the same session if occurring within 30 minutes of a previous View of the same item, or 30 seconds of a previous Download of the same item.
    8. 8. 2012 Usage – JSTOR Small 30,000 % Change from 2011 to 2012 25,000 -24.72% 20,000 15,000 2011 JR1a 10,000 2012 JR1a 5,000 0 COUNTER Journal Report 1a (JR1a) counts the number of successful full-text article requests by month and journal from an archive. The metrics that drive into this are Article Views and PDF downloads, excluding Article Views and PDF Downloads of the same item in the same session if occurring within 30 minutes of a previous View of the same item, or 30 seconds of a previous Download of the same item.
    9. 9. 2013 Usage (YTD) – JSTOR Small 30,000 25,000 20,000 15,000 2011 JR1a 10,000 2012 JR1a 2013 JR1a 5,000 0 COUNTER Journal Report 1a (JR1a) counts the number of successful full-text article requests by month and journal from an archive. The metrics that drive into this are Article Views and PDF downloads, excluding Article Views and PDF Downloads of the same item in the same session if occurring within 30 minutes of a previous View of the same item, or 30 seconds of a previous Download of the same item.
    10. 10. Getting Good Data … Is Hard • Survey of JSTOR participating institutions (May 2013) o 422 responses o No consistent implementation dates (< 100) o Too few responses across institutional archetypes to be statistically relevant Discovery Service # responses AquaBrowser (Serials Solutions) 1 EDS (EBSCO) 154 Encore (Innovative Interfaces) 10 Primo (Ex Libris) 69 WorldCat Local (OCLC) 36 Other¹ 48 Summon (Serials Solutions) 102 Vufind (Villanova University) 2
    11. 11. Getting Good Data … Is Expensive • Supplemented with data from lib-web-cats database (Marshall Breeding) o Increased # of institutions with data to 1,480 o Again, no consistent implementation dates Discovery Service Number AquaBrowser (Serials Solutions) 45 EDS (EBSCO) 379 Encore (Innovative Interfaces) 121 Primo (Ex Libris) 410 WorldCat Local (OCLC) 117 Other¹ 73 Summon (Serials Solutions) 259 Vufind (Villanova University) 41 Backlight (University of Virginia) 5 Enterprise (SirsiDynix) 20 Locally-developed 10
    12. 12. Getting Good Data … Requires Negotiation • Worked directly with EBSCO, Ex Libris, OCLC, and ProQuest to get customer list and implementation dates (July - Sept. 2013) • Supportive of effort • Confidentiality required Discovery Service Institutions provided Matched in CRM JSTOR participants Higher Ed % JSTOR participants % higher education A 4,992 3,149 1,781 925 36% 19% B 760 645 576 417 76% 55% C 63 57 53 48 84% 76% D 623 540 397 308 64% 49%
    13. 13. Caveat Emptor Paraphrasing the late Prof. Aaron Levenstein (Baruch) Statistics are like bathing suits … What they reveal is interesting …. But what they conceal is essential.
    14. 14. Initial Usage Results: U.S. higher education • Culled customer lists to JSTOR participants in U.S. higher education for EDS (EBSCO), Primo (Ex Libris), WorldCat Local (OCLC), and Summon (Serials Solutions/ProQuest) o Looked at average content access per month for each JSTOR Class for 12 months prior/post implementation date o JSTOR average usage change for all U.S. higher education (August 2009 – September 2012): -3.2% Discovery Service Usage Change Post-Implementation A (218) -8.7% B (100) -0.4% C (13) -13.3% D (117) -4.4%
    15. 15. Initial Usage Results: Worldwide higher education • Culled customer lists to JSTOR participants worldwide for EDS (EBSCO), Primo (Ex Libris), WorldCat Local (OCLC), and Summon (Serials Solutions/ProQuest) o Looked at average content access per month for each JSTOR Class for 12 months prior/post implementation date o JSTOR average usage change for all higher education (August 2009 – September 2012): -0.7% Discovery Service Usage Change Post-Implementation A (541) -4.6% B (340) -1.3% C (18) 7.1% D (238) -1.3%
    16. 16. Initial Usage Results: U.S. higher education • There are significant differences by JSTOR Class within each discovery service. Why? Discovery Service Very Large Large Medium Small Very Small Any A (218) -3.1% -11.1% -9.9% -11.1% -12.1% -8.7% (7) (16) (70) (54) (65) 1.1% 7.1% -11.6% -7.4% -3.9% (21) (15) (32) (11) (20) NA NA -8.6% -19.2% 5.7% (0) (0) (3) (5) (5) -10.0% 2.1% 5.6% -5.7% 9.3% (21) (13) (46) (20) (17) -2.9% -3.2% -2.7% -3.2% -5.9% (86) (87) (390) (363) (638) B (100) C (13) D (117) JSTOR (1,599) -0.4% -13.3% -4.4% -3.2%
    17. 17. Initial Usage Results: Worldwide higher education • There are significant differences by JSTOR Class within each discovery service. Why? Discovery Service Very Large Large Medium Small Very Small Any A (541) 2.1% -4.9% -4.5% -9.7% -4.9% -4.6% (11) (51) (134) (109) (220) -1.2% -0.3% -2.8% -4.0% 5.2% (26) (80) (114) (53) (62) NA 15.3% -10.8% -19.2% 30.6% (0) (1) (4) (5) (8) -7.3% 2.5% 4.6% -3.4% -2.6% (24) (30) (89) (36) (58) -2.5% 0.2% -0.9% -2.0% 0.9% (111) (359) (917) (864) (2,637) B (340) C (18) D (238) JSTOR (5,258) -1.3% 7.1% -1.3% -0.7%
    18. 18. Deep-dive into discovery partners • Subject metadata matters … a lot o Relevancy ranking is driven by subject metadata o Subject metadata is a higher priority for JSTOR than full-text • Libraries don’t spend enough time configuring their system for implementation o A vast majority of systems are left at “default” state o Link resolver configuration is critical o Libraries need guidance • Publishers/content providers don’t spend enough time on their data syndication, including how that data is received and used o Archive collections vs. CSP vs. Books o Importance of good KBART files for link resolvers
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