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	Engaging creativity for the practice of online counselling with bereaved young people: exploring practitioner perspectives and experiences. Xuan Luu, Faculty of Health Sciences.
	Engaging creativity for the practice of online counselling with bereaved young people: exploring practitioner perspectives and experiences. Xuan Luu, Faculty of Health Sciences.
	Engaging creativity for the practice of online counselling with bereaved young people: exploring practitioner perspectives and experiences. Xuan Luu, Faculty of Health Sciences.
	Engaging creativity for the practice of online counselling with bereaved young people: exploring practitioner perspectives and experiences. Xuan Luu, Faculty of Health Sciences.
	Engaging creativity for the practice of online counselling with bereaved young people: exploring practitioner perspectives and experiences. Xuan Luu, Faculty of Health Sciences.
	Engaging creativity for the practice of online counselling with bereaved young people: exploring practitioner perspectives and experiences. Xuan Luu, Faculty of Health Sciences.
	Engaging creativity for the practice of online counselling with bereaved young people: exploring practitioner perspectives and experiences. Xuan Luu, Faculty of Health Sciences.
	Engaging creativity for the practice of online counselling with bereaved young people: exploring practitioner perspectives and experiences. Xuan Luu, Faculty of Health Sciences.
	Engaging creativity for the practice of online counselling with bereaved young people: exploring practitioner perspectives and experiences. Xuan Luu, Faculty of Health Sciences.
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Engaging creativity for the practice of online counselling with bereaved young people: exploring practitioner perspectives and experiences. Xuan Luu, Faculty of Health Sciences.

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  • 1. “can u help me get thru my grief?” Exploring creativity for online counselling with parentally bereaved adolescents XUAN LUU | Ph.D. Candidate, Mental Health Research Team Discipline of Behavioural and Social Sciences in Health FACULTY OF HEALTH SCIENCES
  • 2. BACKGROUND TO THE RESEARCH 1
  • 3. Young people and the bereavement experience › Bereavement is a universal element of human experience. › Adolescence: Age range of 12 to 17 years (inclusive). › Significant disruptions to functioning and development (Harris, 1991): - Impairments in academic performance; - Strains on interpersonal relationships; - Disturbances in sleeping patterns. › Many do not feel the need for professional services, however also report higher levels of depressive symptoms (Harrison & Harrington, 2001). › So … what can be done to support bereaved young people? 3
  • 4. Young people and online counselling › Online counselling: Delivery of therapy in cyberspace to a client by a trained professional counsellor (Richards & Viganó, 2012). › Efficacy and outcomes can parallel FTF therapy (Barak, Klein, Proudfoot, 2009). › Can provide a private and emotionally safe environment (King, et al., 2006). › Primary concerns include emotional proximity, absence of non-verbal cues, and temporal limitations (Bambling, King, Reid, & Wegner, 2008). › Important elements include building rapport and accomplishing tasks. › But how does online counselling really help young people? 4
  • 5. Gaps in the knowledge base › Much online counselling research has been quantitative (Richards & Viganó, 2013). › Selected focus areas in the literature at present: - Dynamics of the online therapeutic alliance; - Client outcomes compared to FTF therapy; - Efficacy as a standalone intervention. › Comparatively, qualitative research in this area is still building. › The few studies concentrated on Internet-based therapy for grief and bereavement have been quantitative in design. › As research gains momentum, further exploratory investigations are needed. 5
  • 6. OUTLINE FOR THE PRESENT RESEARCH 2
  • 7. Research aims and questions › Exploring the phenomenon of creativity in relation to the practice of online counselling with parentally bereaved young people. › Seeking to illuminate the perspectives and experiences of practitioners. › Research questions: - How do online counselling practitioners think about creativity in relation to their practice with parentally bereaved adolescents? - How might practitioners currently integrate creativity into their practice with parentally bereaved adolescents? - What are practitioners’ ideas with respect to how creativity can be used more effectively in online mental health practice with parentally bereaved adolescents? 7
  • 8. Design, methodology, and analysis › Series of in-depth, open-ended, semi-structured online interviews to be conducted asynchronously via e-mail. › 15-20 online counselling practitioners. Sample questions: - Do you think online counselling practice needs creativity in it? If so, why? If not, why not? - How do you think creativity helps young people work through their bereavement experiences? › Analysis to be undertaken using a Grounded Theory approach. - Aim is to develop a cohesive theory that describes how online counselling practitioners interpret and understand creativity in the context of practice. 8
  • 9. References › Bambling, M., King, R., Reid, W., & Wegner, K. (2008). Online counselling: The experience of counsellors providing synchronous singlesession counselling to young people. Counselling and Psychotherapy Research, 8(2), 110-116. doi: 10.1080/14733140802055011 › Barak, A., Klein, B., & Proudfoot, J. G. (2009). Defining Internet-supported therapeutic interventions. Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 38(1), 4-17. doi: 10.1007/s12160-009-9130-7 › Harris, E. S. (1991). Adolescent bereavement following the death of a parent: An exploratory study. Child Psychiatry and Human Development, 21(4), 267-281. doi: 10.1007/BF00705931 › Harrison, L., & Harrington, R. (2001). Adolescents’ bereavement experiences. Prevalence, association with depressive symptoms, and use of services. Journal of Adolescence, 24(2), 159-169. doi: 10.1006/jado.2001.0379 › King, R., Bambling, M., Lloyd, C., Gomurra, R., Smith, S., Reid, W., & Wegner, K. (2006). Online counselling: The motives and experiences of young people who choose the Internet instead of face to face or telephone counsellign. Counselling and Psychotherapy Research, 6(3), 169-174. doi: 10.1080/14733140600848179 › Richards, D., & Viganó, N. (2012). Online Counseling. In Y. Zheng (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Cyber Behavior (Vol. 1, pp. 699–713). New York, NY: IGI Global. › Richards, D., & Viganó, N. (2013). Online counseling: A narrative and critical review of the literature. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 69(9), 994-1011. doi: 10.1002/jclp.21974 9

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