Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Measuring the Strategic Impact and Value of Human Resources Development Practices: A Cross-industry Analysis
Measuring the Strategic Impact and Value of Human Resources Development Practices: A Cross-industry Analysis
Measuring the Strategic Impact and Value of Human Resources Development Practices: A Cross-industry Analysis
Measuring the Strategic Impact and Value of Human Resources Development Practices: A Cross-industry Analysis
Measuring the Strategic Impact and Value of Human Resources Development Practices: A Cross-industry Analysis
Measuring the Strategic Impact and Value of Human Resources Development Practices: A Cross-industry Analysis
Measuring the Strategic Impact and Value of Human Resources Development Practices: A Cross-industry Analysis
Measuring the Strategic Impact and Value of Human Resources Development Practices: A Cross-industry Analysis
Measuring the Strategic Impact and Value of Human Resources Development Practices: A Cross-industry Analysis
Measuring the Strategic Impact and Value of Human Resources Development Practices: A Cross-industry Analysis
Measuring the Strategic Impact and Value of Human Resources Development Practices: A Cross-industry Analysis
Measuring the Strategic Impact and Value of Human Resources Development Practices: A Cross-industry Analysis
Measuring the Strategic Impact and Value of Human Resources Development Practices: A Cross-industry Analysis
Measuring the Strategic Impact and Value of Human Resources Development Practices: A Cross-industry Analysis
Measuring the Strategic Impact and Value of Human Resources Development Practices: A Cross-industry Analysis
Measuring the Strategic Impact and Value of Human Resources Development Practices: A Cross-industry Analysis
Measuring the Strategic Impact and Value of Human Resources Development Practices: A Cross-industry Analysis
Measuring the Strategic Impact and Value of Human Resources Development Practices: A Cross-industry Analysis
Measuring the Strategic Impact and Value of Human Resources Development Practices: A Cross-industry Analysis
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Measuring the Strategic Impact and Value of Human Resources Development Practices: A Cross-industry Analysis

1,042

Published on

Research into the perceived strategic impact and value of HRD practices

Research into the perceived strategic impact and value of HRD practices

Published in: Business, Education
1 Comment
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,042
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
27
Comments
1
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Measuring the Strategic Impact and Value of Human Resources Development Practices: A Cross-industry Analysis CHARLES COTTER 7 SEPTEMBER 2011
  • 2. PRESENTATION OVERVIEW Defining Strategic Human Resources Management (SHRD) The characteristics of SHRD Research objectives Research methods and process Research findings Research conclusion Research recommendations
  • 3. DEFINING SHRD The process of changing an organization, stakeholders outside it, groups inside it and people employed by it through planned learning so that they possess the knowledge and skills needed in the future. (Rothwell & Kazanas, 1994:16) The creation of a learning culture, within which a range of training, development and learning strategies both respond to corporate strategy and also help shape and influence it. (McCracken & Wallace, 2000:427) The strategic management of training, development, and of management or professional education interventions, so as to achieve the objectives of the organisation while at the same time ensuring the full utilisation of the knowledge and skills of individual employees. (Garavan, 1991:19)
  • 4. THE CHARACTERISTICS OF SHRD Integration with and shaping of organizational missions and goals Top management support and leadership Environmental scanning HRD strategies, plans and policies Line manager commitment and involvement (strategic partnerships)
  • 5. THE CHARACTERISTICS OF SHRD Existence of complementary HRM activities (strategic partnerships with HRM) Expanded trainers’ role acting as change consultants Recognition of and influencing of organizational culture Emphasis on cost effectiveness evaluation Strategic value proposition of HRD
  • 6. RESEARCH OBJECTIVES To measure the current strategic value and impact of HRD practices To determine whether a perceptual gap exists between training and business/line managers regarding the strategic value and impact of HRD interventions To determine whether the HRD function has adopted a performance-based culture with regard to implementing the characteristics of SHRD
  • 7. RESEARCH METHODS AND PROCESS Questionnaire (46 closed-ended questions using a 4-point rating scale) Cross-industry analysis (private and public sectors) 268 respondents HRD and Training Managers; SDF’s; Line/Business Managers and Academics/SME’s Various descriptive and inferential statistical measures
  • 8. RESEARCH FINDINGS The overall mean score for the measurement of the strategic value and impact of HRD for the group of respondents is 2.69 The four (4) highest recording industries were: Chemical, pharmaceutical and related: 3.03 Others: 2.91 Food, beverage and hospitality: 2.83 Banking and insurance: 2.78
  • 9. RESEARCH FINDINGS The three lowest recording industries were: Education, training and development: 2.54 Government: 2.62 IT, telecommunications and related: 2.68 That HRM/D managers (2.84) and training administrators (2.72) ratings are considerably higher than line managers (2.61) and academics/SME’s (2.45)
  • 10. RESEARCH FINDINGS That small (2.76) to medium-sized organizations (2.73) ratings are slightly higher than larger/national (2.71) and larger/multi-national organizations (2.64). That those employees with tenure of less than one year (2.83); those who have been working for more than 10 years (2.74) and those with 1-3 years (2.73) rated the strategic impact of HRD practices as the highest. Employees with 7-10 years (2.69) and 3-5 years (2.61) of employment scored the lowest two mean scores.
  • 11. RESEARCH FINDINGS That the four highest scoring characteristics were: Top management support (2.78) HRD plans and policies (2.76) Line management commitment and involvement (2.75) Integration with organizational mission and goals (2.75) That the three lowest scoring characteristics are: Strategic value proposition (2.56) Expanded trainer roles (2.58) Emphasis on evaluation (2.58)
  • 12. RESEARCH CONCLUSION - Measuring the current strategic value and impact of HRD practices That the overall, cross-industry strategic impact of HRD practices is unsatisfactory. HRD practices are not strategic when measured against the identified characteristics and sub-factors of SHRD.
  • 13. RESEARCH CONCLUSION - Implementing the characteristics of SHRD Companies have not adopted a performance-based culture in which SHRD practices are effectively implemented and well managed. At an administrative and operational level, HRD practices are sound. However, at a strategic level there is an apparent shortcoming. HRD practices still tend to be more administrative when implementing the characteristics of HRD . There is also a glaring shortcoming regarding the measurement and evaluation of HRD activities and impact.
  • 14. RESEARCH CONCLUSION - Perceptual gap between HRD and business/line managers A definite perceptual gap between HRD managers and business managers regarding the strategic value of HRD practices
  • 15. RESEARCH RECOMMENDATIONS - The status quo of strategic HRD practices That all organizations take cognizance of the below- average, perceived strategic impact and value of HRD practices Multiple stakeholders seriously rethink their current HRD practices Multiple stakeholders pool their vast resources and intellectual capital to form a pool of expertise on how to re-align, re-position and transform current HRD practices Multiple stakeholders work together vigilantly and conscientiously to improve the effectiveness and strategic value of HRD practices
  • 16. RESEARCH RECOMMENDATIONS - Implementing the characteristics of SHRD That organizations across all industries take cognizance of the below-average perceived shortcomings of the various characteristics of HRD. Cognizance should be taken of the 3 lowest-rated characteristics. That companies utilize various interventions as a basis for improving the strategic value and impact of HRD practices. Companies should pinpoint the other low-scoring characteristics and implement HRD improvement strategies and plans.
  • 17. RESEARCH RECOMMENDATIONS - Perceptual gap between HRD and business/line managers Engage in more constructive communication in order to identify the sources of the identified perceptual gaps. Collaborate and partner to ensure that HRD practices are more strategically relevant.
  • 18. RESEARCH RECOMMENDATIONS - General That additional and follow-up research at doctoral level be undertaken Developing a conceptualized SHRD framework to enable organizations to analyze, measure, monitor, manage, implement and evaluate their HRD practices Cognizance be taken of the findings of this research project Use these research findings as a base-line and/or benchmark and as a means of improving the strategic impact of the HRD practices
  • 19. CONCLUSION Summary Questions Thank you Contact details: 084 562 9446 or charlescot@polka.co.za

×