Social Marketing Conference:Changing Behaviour Through       Communications      30 November 2011           www.charitycom...
Social media and behaviourchange: planning and doingMax St JohnHead of Non-Profit and Public Sector@maxwellineverPage 2 | ...
Not mePage 3 | Social media and behaviour change
MePage 4 | Social media and behaviour change
Who I work withPage 5 | Social media and behaviour change
Social media, blah blah blahPage 6 | Social media and behaviour change
Designing a campaignWhat am I talking about?Page 8 | Social media and behaviour change
Insight and planning You know your target audience but what do you know about their life online? • Where do they go and wh...
Understanding audience hangouts                                              google.com/adplannerPage 10 | Social media an...
Researching attitudes                                              brandwatch.netPage 11 | Social media and behaviour change
Finding out who they listen to                                              google.com (look left!)Page 12 | Social media ...
Planning: conclusion • Find where they are and what they do online • Understand their attitudes and language • Map their i...
Changing behaviour Social media for changing behaviour: • Case study: Social games / stages of change • Case study: Online...
Stages of change Pre-contemplation: “I’m unaware I have a problem” Contemplation – “I need to do something about this” Pre...
Stages of change and social games                                              bit.ly/thinkpig                            ...
Stages of change and social games Pre-contemplation: “I’m unaware I have a problem” Soft introduction of the issues, throu...
Social games: evaluation Pig farming methods are reported on at a national level. We can’t realistically tie this back to ...
Social Cognitive Reciprocal determinism – “What’s telling me to change?” Behavioural capability – “Am I able to make this ...
Social cognitive and communities                                          virginmediapioneers.comPage 20 | Social media an...
Social cognitive and communities Reciprocal determinism – “What’s telling me to change?” Find the right partners, traffic ...
Online communities: evaluation Core evaluation was Social Return on Investment. Jobs created, decrease in people claiming ...
Time to change and social proof                                facebook.com/timetochangePage 23 | Social media and behavio...
What is social proof?  “A psychological phenomenon where people assume theactions of others reflect correct behavior for a...
Five ‘types’ of social proof1) Expert social proof – credible experts in the field.2) Celebrity social proof – celebs your...
Rounding up • Know your audience in context of their digital lives • Social games are huge and can be used to educate • On...
Any questions?All links here: bit.ly/charitycommslinksI like feedback – find me at:max.stjohn@nixonmcinnes.co.uktwitter.co...
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Social media for behaviour change

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Max St John, NixonMcInnes
www.charitycomms.org.uk/events

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Social media for behaviour change

  1. 1. Social Marketing Conference:Changing Behaviour Through Communications 30 November 2011 www.charitycomms.org.uk www.twitter.com/CharityComms www.facebook.com/CharityComms
  2. 2. Social media and behaviourchange: planning and doingMax St JohnHead of Non-Profit and Public Sector@maxwellineverPage 2 | Social media and behaviour change
  3. 3. Not mePage 3 | Social media and behaviour change
  4. 4. MePage 4 | Social media and behaviour change
  5. 5. Who I work withPage 5 | Social media and behaviour change
  6. 6. Social media, blah blah blahPage 6 | Social media and behaviour change
  7. 7. Designing a campaignWhat am I talking about?Page 8 | Social media and behaviour change
  8. 8. Insight and planning You know your target audience but what do you know about their life online? • Where do they go and what do they do? • What are their attitudes and language? • Who do they listen to?Who’s NixonMcInnes?Page 9 | Social media and behaviour change
  9. 9. Understanding audience hangouts google.com/adplannerPage 10 | Social media and behaviour change
  10. 10. Researching attitudes brandwatch.netPage 11 | Social media and behaviour change
  11. 11. Finding out who they listen to google.com (look left!)Page 12 | Social media and behaviour change
  12. 12. Planning: conclusion • Find where they are and what they do online • Understand their attitudes and language • Map their influencers – people they listen to • Don’t do this in isolation, talk to them too. • Use all of this to help inform your campaign.Who’s NixonMcInnes?Page 13 | Social media and behaviour change
  13. 13. Changing behaviour Social media for changing behaviour: • Case study: Social games / stages of change • Case study: Online community / social cognitive • Overview: Social norms and social proofWho’s NixonMcInnes?Page 14 | Social media and behaviour change
  14. 14. Stages of change Pre-contemplation: “I’m unaware I have a problem” Contemplation – “I need to do something about this” Preparation – “I know what I’m going to change” Action – “I’ve recently changed my behaviour” Maintenance – “I haven’t relapsed”Page 15 | Social media and behaviour change
  15. 15. Stages of change and social games bit.ly/thinkpig bit.ly/thinkpigPage 16 | Social media and behaviour change
  16. 16. Stages of change and social games Pre-contemplation: “I’m unaware I have a problem” Soft introduction of the issues, through game play. Contemplation – “I need to do something about this” Educate through community engagement via Facebook page. Preparation – “I know what I’m going to change” Provide recipes and other take aways to make change easy. Action – “I’ve recently changed my behaviour” Encourage the audience to self-report through comments. Maintenance – “I haven’t relapsed” Use long term contact through Facebook to help maintain.Page 17 | Social media and behaviour change
  17. 17. Social games: evaluation Pig farming methods are reported on at a national level. We can’t realistically tie this back to Facebook activity. Instead we look for indicators that demonstrate success. • Awareness: exposure to messaging – game plays. • Contemplation: engagement through page – likes/comments. • Preparation: uptake of tools – downloads of recipes.Page 18 | Social media and behaviour change
  18. 18. Social Cognitive Reciprocal determinism – “What’s telling me to change?” Behavioural capability – “Am I able to make this change?” Self-efficacy – “Can I really do this?” Observational learning – “If they can do it, so can I.” Reinforcements – “How can I celebrate my achievement?”Page 19 | Social media and behaviour change
  19. 19. Social cognitive and communities virginmediapioneers.comPage 20 | Social media and behaviour change
  20. 20. Social cognitive and communities Reciprocal determinism – “What’s telling me to change?” Find the right partners, traffic drivers and channels. Behavioural capability – “Am I able to make this change?” Provide tools, advice training and information. Self-efficacy – “Can I really do this?” Build confidence through the ability to create new networks. Observational learning – “If they can do it, so can I.” Promote realistic role models that prove it’s possible. Reinforcements – “How can I celebrate my achievement?” Use feedback mechanisms to provide encouragement.Page 21 | Social media and behaviour change
  21. 21. Online communities: evaluation Core evaluation was Social Return on Investment. Jobs created, decrease in people claiming benefits etc. Measured using on/offline qual and quant surveys. We used social media to measure social capital: • Community make-up: size and segmentation by behaviour. • Intensity of use: regularity and depth of engagement. • Network data: number and strength of connections.Page 22 | Social media and behaviour change
  22. 22. Time to change and social proof facebook.com/timetochangePage 23 | Social media and behaviour change
  23. 23. What is social proof? “A psychological phenomenon where people assume theactions of others reflect correct behavior for a given situation, prominent in ambiguous social situations where people areunable to determine the appropriate mode of behavior, and is driven by the assumption that surrounding people possess more knowledge about the situation.” OR: “the positive influence created when someone finds out that others are doing something.”Page 24 | Social media and behaviour change
  24. 24. Five ‘types’ of social proof1) Expert social proof – credible experts in the field.2) Celebrity social proof – celebs your audience identify with.3) User social proof – individual’s stories of their experience.4) Wisdom of the crowds social proof – weight of numbers.5) Wisdom of friends – endorsement of people that are trusted.Page 25 | Social media and behaviour change
  25. 25. Rounding up • Know your audience in context of their digital lives • Social games are huge and can be used to educate • Online communities = multiple levers for change • Social proof is powerful and an innate part of digital • Social media isn’t a ‘cheap option’, get the mix right • Always be engaging (or be invisible) • Evaluate indicators - don’t measure everythingWho’stheory still counts but we’re all still learning • The NixonMcInnes?Page 26 | Social media and behaviour change
  26. 26. Any questions?All links here: bit.ly/charitycommslinksI like feedback – find me at:max.stjohn@nixonmcinnes.co.uktwitter.com/maxwellineveruk.linkedin.com/in/maxstjohnPage 27 | Social media and behaviour change
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