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Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation
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Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations | Documentation

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Diploma Project Documentation 2010 by Nandini Chandavarkar

Diploma Project Documentation 2010 by Nandini Chandavarkar

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  • 1. 1 INCONGRUOUS LUDICROUS COMBINATIONS DIPLOMA PROJECT DOCUMENTATION 2010 NANDINI CHANDAVARKAR IDEAS
  • 2. 2
  • 3. 3 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS LUDICROUS COMBINATIONS DIPLOMA PROJECT DOCUMENTATION 2010
  • 4. 4
  • 5. 5 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONS For my mother & my grandparents who have always trusted my life choices..
  • 6. 6 contsect
  • 7. 7 PREMISE 09 PROPOSAL 13 RESEARCH 21 WORKSHOP AT 31 PARIKRMA THE PROTOTYPE 63 END NOTE 100 ACKNOWLEDGE- 105 MENTS ‘... where the imaginative & the functional fuse and finally become indistinguishable. ‘Great things are done when men and mountains meet; This is not done by jostling in the street.’ ‘Design without impact is not design. It is just stuff.’ ‘How many “faces” lie hidden, waiting for the time when curious eyes will find them in their secret places. In the heart of a leaf or the bark of a tree. In a frozen pond or the turning sea. In the twist of a chair or the look of a key or the shrivelled skin of an elephant’s knee.’ ‘I’m not what has happened to me: I am what I choose to become.’ “the whole purpose of public education throughout the world is to produce university professors.” tents CONTENTS | SECTIONS tions
  • 8. 8 Incongruous Ideas, Ludicrous Combinations My name is Nandini Chandavarkar, one of the many ‘kinky collared dogs’ from the pound (as quoted by one of our professors) just finishing four years of Visual Communication Design and on my way to becoming an independent practitioner, with a proposal in hand. This book documents every aspect of that journey to help create something valuable for every child and professional. And hopefully save the world!
  • 9. 9 ‘... where the imaginative & the functional fuse and finally become indistinguishable. Milton Glaser
  • 10. 10 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONS Career Choice? It’s Science Bangalore: Science continues to be revered among school students, not so humanities. Civil services, once much respected, is now career choice 16; while the less said about teaching and research, the better. These were the findings thrown up by a survey conducted by Eduquity Career Technologies Pvt Ltd, a human resource assessment service provider in Bangalore. The survey was conducted over two years across 2,123 students. “We wanted to know what Indian youth really wanted to do,’’ said R Dhirendra, CEO. And this is what they found: Among the top 10 careers chosen, 6 were linked to science (engineering, medicine, physical sciences, life sciences, architecture, sports, chartered accountancy, software/IT, commercial pilot, defence); not one was from the humanities (arts). This reinforces the value Indians place on science. Civil services once highly regarded are now ranked 16, coming after journalism / media, designing, music etc. Research and teaching have a few takers, and are ranked 22nd and 27th; “Together, they account for the career aspirations of just 1% of the respondents,’’ says Sudha Bhogle, head, student solutions, Eduquity. Now, though medicine and engineering hold their own as they have done in the past, there is also a shift towards high-paying jobs like software and commercial pilots; as also high profile careers in sports, the financial sector and defence. Only five careers (engineering, medicine, physical sciences, life sciences, architecture) account for nearly 41% of the sample and another 30 occupations account for not even 5% of the responses. “Most students are probably not even aware of the different career opportunities available to them,’’ says Sudha Bhogle. There were notable stereotypical gender differences in career choice. Boys ranked engineering number 1. What was interesting was that they ranked sports and physical sciences 2nd and 3rd. They did not choose any career via the humanities (arts) within the first 10 ranks. Another interesting find was that more boys chose the pure sciences (5.9%), even over IT (5.5%). Medicine stood ninth at 3.3%. For girls, engineering came first, followed by medicine, architecture, life sciences and physical sciences — the first five going to science streams. But the next five were designing, journalism, dance, CA and law. So girls opted for careers across the spectrum. PREMISE
  • 11. 11 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONS
  • 12. 12 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONS College Goers choose the WRONG STREAM! Among the 1,211 college students (+2) in the survey, 7% revealed they had not decided on any career. But what an eye-opener was the fact that 20.23% across science, arts and commerce opted for careers they could not pursue as they were in the wrong stream. In fact the maximum number of students who had made wrong career decisions were from commerce (39%). So, approximately 27% or a quarter of the entire sample, had chosen the wrong specialization. A popular career choice for arts students was communicative art, followed by counselling & psychology; 30% of commerce students wanted to become chartered accountants. For science students, interestingly, software/IT was not one of the preferred career choices, though engineering and medicine continued to top. Sports, music and law were popular choices. A gender-wise analysis showed that 25% of boys in arts chose law, followed by journalism. For girls, it was journalism followed by counselling. Further, girls chose 5 out of 10 careers dealing with nurturance and creativity and those stereotypical considered feminine- counselling, music, psychology, design, HRD. For boys in the science stream, engineering is the most popular choice. The second (around 7%) is commercial pilot, while defence services come 4th. medicine come 5th. For girls from science, medicine is the most popular (38%), followed by engineering (34%). For boys from commerce, CA is the preferred career. The next two are sports and the defence services, both remotely connected to commerce. Times of India | Geetha Rao | TNN | June 22nd PREMISE
  • 13. 13 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONS ‘Great things are done when men and mountains meet; This is not done by jostling in the street.’ William Blake
  • 14. 14 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONS Background As I look back and wonder how I came to choose Design as my career option, I remember a Career Fair my school had organized for our high school batch. The room was filled with an array of at least 50 professions to choose from and we were baffled. Each child was tested on their aptitude and interests by a professional career counsellor and was presented with a possible course of action. Our parents envied the choices we had, claiming that when they were our age only 3 options were presented to them- Engineering, Medicine and Arts. Our school catered to the middle & higher classes of society and had the necessary resources to expose us to these professions and help steer us in the right direction. In May, 2010, 8 suicides were reported in Karnataka due to students failing in their SSLC and PUC examinations. And I thought to myself, did their schools have the resources to provide a counsellor? Would they have changed their mind if they had known about their aptitude for a certain subject? Did they think they only had the same three career choices that our parents had? Do Government schools offer career services to their students? PROPOSAL | BACKGROUND
  • 15. 15 diplomaprojectproposal DIPLOMA PROJECT PROPOSAL BRIEF 16 NEED 17 RESEARCH QUESTIONS 18 APPROACH/ PROCESS 19 PRODUCT 20
  • 16. 16 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONS To expose, educate and involve children from low- income groups to a diverse database of opportunities available to them by recognizing their interests, perceiving analogies and relations between them & introducing them to new concepts in a way that is both creative and interactive. Deconstructing the term ‘Career’ from the viewpoint of ‘Interests’. PROPOSAL | BRIEF
  • 17. 17 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONSPROPOSAL | NEED Need To empower every child with the knowledge of the variety of professions available to him/ her, apart from Engineering, Medicine & Arts. To engage children in finding out information for themselves. To urge school programs to take children’s futures seriously. To involve parents in helping see through their children’s aspirations. To address the important values in every profession. To give the right to every child to dream big for themselves and realize that nothing is impossible. To dismiss notable stereotypical gender differences in life choices. To convey to children that life is organic in nature. To intrigue children. Target Audience Children from low economic backgrounds whose families generate an income of Rs. 2000 or less per month. Children who attend school run by either an NGO or by the Government. Ages: 12 to 14 years
  • 18. 18 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONS Research Questions 1. Employment vs. Livelihood 2. What are the range of opportunities available today? How can design help in exposing these professions? 3. What are the opportunities available for children who come from low socio-economic backgrounds? How can the knowledge of these opportunities help in children’s aspirations? 4. How can the range of professions be introduced in a fun and interactive way? What role can the school play in making this happen? 5. How can an interest in a subject lead to a career choice especially for these children? How can one go beyond the word ‘Career’? 6. How can design help children differentiate between noble professions? 7. How can children help in improving their family’s capability of living a better life? What role do parents play in imparting values from their own professions? 8. How can technology help in familiarizing children to various professions? How can children gain access to this technology? 9. How can children be empowered to dream big for themselves? 10. How can society help in providing children with a platform where their aspirations can be met? How important is practicality? 11. How can design eradicate gender differences in career options? 12. How can children be enthralled with the knowledge & integration of interests? 13. How can schools help see to a child’s interests without it’s curriculum deterring it? PROPOSAL | RESEARCH QUESTIONS
  • 19. 19 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONS Approach/Process Understanding the context & creating a sound hypothesis New Economic Foundation, Appreciative Enquiry, Participative Design, Roger Hart, Paulo Freire, Robert Chambers, IDEO Think Pad cards. Creating the database • Researching unique professions and already existing career options. • Sources from Newspaper articles & clips, Education Times, Online Job Portals- naukri.com, monster. com, etc. • Career Digest • Career Counselling Programs in schools • Online research • Speak with people from various backgrounds • Questionnaires to assess the professions children already know • National and International examples PROPOSAL | APPROACH/ PROCESS Role of Psychology Research the role of psychology in career counselling through, • Interviews with Psychologist, Books, Internet Designing a Career Module: I will be playing an active role with the help of teachers in designing an interactive module. I will be working with children from low-income groups, involving them in the design process through, • Workshops- Role-playing, Story-telling, Activities, 3 days a week for 2 months • Individual and Group interviews with children • Research exercises in the library & Internet • Aptitude tests • ‘Career Friday’- One speaker per week to talk about their profession • Involving parents to speak about their professions • Introducing them to national and international people in unique professions disregarding gender • Audio & Visual Documentation
  • 20. 20 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONS Product I hope to come out with a product during the process in the form of an online portal for children and students, or/and in the form of print material. Apart from that, I will be documenting the entire process in a visual format. Resources • Newspapers, Books, Internet, Articles Interviews with professionals • Working with NGOs like Parikrma & Government schools Interviews, • Discussions with people- Ms. Shukla Bose (Founder - CEO, Parikrma Humanity Foundation) Ms. Kanchan Banerjee (Akshara Foundation, Managing Trustee) Geetha Narayanan (Teacher, Educational Entrepreneur, Research Scholar, New Media Art Curator) • Psychologists, Career Counsellors, Teachers, Volunteers Learning Outcomes • Understanding the context of the problem. • Educating and discovering creativity for myself and understanding its value. • Designing & carefully structuring a module in general and also when dealing with children. • Learning to facilitate and interact with parents & children. • Sensitizing myself to terms and the various problems faced by the target audience. • Learning to work with the resources available to me. • Discovering how to engage children therefore motivating them to learn. • Understanding the role of a designer in the area of education & development. • The process of effective documentation. PROPOSAL | PRODUCT
  • 21. 21 ‘Design without impact is not design. It is just stuff.’Cameron Sinclair
  • 22. 22 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONS Dialogue Looking back, the people I shared my ideas with ultimately steered me towards my goal. Some inspired me, while others challenged my rationale. They got me thinking beyond just the word. They opened my eyes to the truth. Aroused questions about our Indian Education System. I would sincerely like to thank each and everyone of them individually. Gabriel Harp Research Associate at Centre for the Study of Science, Technology, and Policy, Faculty Artist-in-Residence at the Centre for Experimental Media Arts, Srishti School of Art, Design, and Technology Ms. Shukla Bose Founder & CEO of Parikrma Humanity Foundation Kanchan Bannerjee Managing Trustee of Akshara Foundation. She is a sociologist and is trained in communications and teaching children with learning disabilities. She has been associated with the planning and execution of several of Akshara Foundation’s programmes since 2000. Geetha Narayanan Founder-Director at Srishti School of Art Design and Technology and Mallya Aditi International School in Bangalore, India. A Teacher, Educational Entrepreneur, Research Scholar & New Media Art Curator. Geetanjali Sachdev A graduate of Carnegie Mellon University with a degree in Graphic Communication Management, and is currently pursuing an MA in Education from Oxford Brookes University, UK. She is Faculty at Srishti College of Art, Design & Technology and Dean of Centre of Education, Research, Training & Development Vinay Goel Country Head of Products for Google India. In this role, he is responsible for Google’s product strategy and delivery functions in India. Over the past year, he has successfully grown Google’s India business across all product categories including Search, Social Networking and Mobile. RESEARCH | DIALOGUE
  • 23. 23 researchRESEARCH DIALOGUE 24 MAPS 27 READINGS 106 TED 30
  • 24. 24 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONS Dialogue with Gabriel Harp 1/ I want to know more about you on it. Who is doing this? Why and what are the expected results? I personally think it’s worth treating this as a profession space to gain credibility. Reason is, you never know who is watching. For example, I was just having a discussion about your project with a key executive for workforce planning in the State of Michigan – which as you may or may not know is seriously economically challenged. They are asking some of the same questions you are and may be looking at your blog right now. Plus, what you are doing IS, no matter how you look at it, valuable. So it makes sense to set it up as professionally as possible. It’s not the piece of paper that matters. Because if you do it well, you’ve set yourself up very strategically to be able to offer a very critical service, for students and employers. 2/ Also, what hooks can you add to know you’ve accomplished your brief? Your brief describes the project, but it doesn’t mention any evaluative components. This is another way of saying, “What will they be able to do at the end of the day as a result of this?” This might mean compiling exercises that students go through–such as evaluating all of the jobs that their diploma makes them eligible for. Or, more creatively, can they create new job descriptions that align more closely with their interests, from ones that already exist? These become tangible outputs that demonstrate the process and the product of your activities. 3/ Last I would say to include discussions with employers. They should be more than willing to share their goals for workforce development and talent planning. There should be reams of data available on this. And one really beneficial thing you could do as a designer is make this more accessible, i.e. to show how aspirations will match up with what people expect to happen in the future employment market. RESEARCH | DIALOGUE
  • 25. 25 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONS Dialogue with Ms. Shukla Bose I approached the Founder & CEO of Parikrma Humanity Foundation, Ms. Shukla Bose, to share with her my intentions to expose children, initially to the diverse database of career options now available to them. A dialogue that helped adapt my proposal to what it is today. 1/ Children here at Parikrma are exposed to things much earlier in age, unlike government schools. Many corporates come down from various countries and backgrounds and inevitably share these with the children. 2/ The word ‘career’ in itself is very limiting. The idea is to create interest- that spark which encourages them wanting to learn more! How do we take their interests forward to the next step? How can we help see to a child’s interests without the school curriculum deterring it? How can one go beyond the word ‘career’? 3/ Provide them with the width of options! That way it will be fun & more creative. Explore the combining of interests, such as Art collaborated with Science, etc. Expose them to things they would have never imagined. Dialogue with Ms. Kanchan Banerjee 1/ Parikrma is deemed as a special school. Their methods of teaching differ from Government schools. Also the level of learning is much higher. Government schools rarely tap into options like Art. They might not even know they have an interest in that subject. It might be better to work with children from Grade 9 and 10 (15- 16) as well as Grade 11 & 12. Children from Grade 6 might not be able to grasp/ see the importance of it. 2/ The structure of questions for the children is important. Find out the subjects they have an aptitude for. Consult a Career Counsellor. Find the gap and tap into it. 3/ Tap into technology- Internet, touch screen. Find various sources about different careers from- Newspaper, Career 360, Career Digest, naukri.com, monster.com, etc. 4/ You have to bear in mind that these children might not have the courage to put their foot down about their future. Engaging the parents to help children in their daily routine makes a difference. 5/ One route of enquiry could be- Aptitude test > Interests > Qualifications needed for the job > Institutions that provide the job > Cycle of Career Counselling. RESEARCH | DIALOGUE
  • 26. 26 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONS Dialogue with Mrs. Geetha Narayanan 1/ Exposing the children is well & good but what do want to prove? Are you showing them these creative concepts and ideas to lead them to believe, to keep dreaming? 2/ Their livelihoods are important to them, their families, their life- How will your outcome help with that? How will they be able to access this? 3/ Children at Parikrma are fortunate to be provided free education. Will the opportunities you expose them to be free as well? 4/ How can you be considered an equal? How are you appropriating 4 years of Visual Communication & Design Learning into your project? 5/ You need to understand their context better. You need to understand Poverty. Resources: Roger Hart, Paulo Freire, Participative Design, New Economic Foundation, Appreciative Enquiry, Robert Chambers’ article on Employment vs. Livelihoods. Dialogue with Geetanjali Sachdev Before you think about the form of your product, you must find out the children’s source of knowledge. Maybe they look for information over the Internet, or they ask an authority like a teacher or a parent. Facilitate the process through art based pedagogy/ methodology. Find a line of enquiry. Immerse them in an experience. Have them come up with ideas by combing their interests and aspirations. Use an example like a fireman who jumps and does acrobatics or an IAS officer who paints and dances. Research the term Epistemology- theory of knowledge. Thereafter, find the hook! Dialogue with Mr. Vinay Goel 1/ A customized Google Search Engine for children. The language on most sites dealing with information is not suited for all ages. Place the information into various categories- Primary Education, Secondary Education, etc. 2/ Create a weave of leads. For example, If you type the word ‘cloth’ in the search bar, it provides routes that lead to types of textile > Textile programs in various colleges > How to start your own textile company. (Based on the ‘tags’ system) RESEARCH | DIALOGUE
  • 27. 27 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONSRESEARCH | MAPS Map of My ‘Interests Pool’ After my discussion with Ms. Shukla Bose, I mapped my own interests, combining them with two or more and came up with unique career opportunities.
  • 28. 28 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONSRESEARCH | MAPS
  • 29. 29 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONSRESEARCH | MAPS ‘Enthrall’ Map What does it take to enthrall a child? This map illustrates the semantics of the word ‘Enthrall’ and the big ideas related to them.
  • 30. 30 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONS TEDTALKS Inspirational talks by some of the most reputed personalities of Cultural Education. SIRKENROBINSON “SCHOOLS KILL CREATIVITY.” JUNE 2006 “BRING ON THE LEARNING REVOLUTION” MAY 2010 CHARLESLEADBEATER “EDUCATION INNOVATION IN THE SLUMS” JUNE 2010 KIRANBIRSETHI “TEACHES KIDS TO TAKE CHARGE” JANUARY 2010 JANINEBENYUS “BIOMIMICRY IN ACTION” AUGUST 2009 JOSHUAKLEIN “ON THE INTELLIGENCE OF CROWS” MAY 2008 PAULSERENO “DIGS UP DINOSAURS” JANUARY 2009 RESEARCH | TED
  • 31. 31 ‘How many “faces” lie hidden, waiting for the time when curious eyes will find them in their secret places. In the heart of a leaf or the bark of a tree. In a frozen pond or the turning sea. In the twist of a chair or the look of a key or the shrivelled skin of an elephant’s knee.’ Irwin Dermer
  • 32. 32 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONS Dialogue with Ambika Parchure Head-Cocurriculum at Parikrma Humanity Foundation 1/ We want to give them the maximum amount of exposure, whether 8th or 9th grade. We want to identify their interests. Once we have identified it, then we can channelize & find sponsors. 2/ Here at Parikrma, exposure in terms of field trips & a defined curriculum exists. We have introduced skills- painting watercolours, making paper products, toy-making, solid geometry. In terms of various options available through story- telling, puppet-making, musical instruments, animation. This will in turn help them to map- in the sense visual, spacial, problem solving. 3/ Research Multiple Intelligences. Integrating all the senses is key. 4/ Children learn subjectively- through visual, or tactile, or kinesthetic, or auditory. This will help them be more focussed. My Note I have always had a keen interest in children and designing for them. And once being a child myself, wanted to know more about a lot of things but didn’t know who to ask. I wanted to participate in the field of Design, clueless of what Design really meant. And this seems to be the case with the children I’m working with here, at Parikrma in Bangalore. Parikrma Humanity Foundation is a nonprofit organization that aims at transforming education for the undeserved children in urban India. They work towards providing equal access to the best opportunities by managing every child’s education cycle right from kindergarten to college. They serve 28 communities with an average household income of Rs. 1500-2000 per month. English is introduced at an early age and is regarded as the means for communication. Initially I was planning to work with children between the ages of 15-18 yrs but the level of learning of the children here at Parikrma is so high that the Founder & CEO of Parikrma, Ms. Shukla Bose advised me to work with a younger age group (12-14 yrs). I now work with 13 eager children (boys & girls) from Grade 7, between the ages of 12-13 yrs, hosting workshops 3 times a week for 2 months. I aim to inspire them, make them more aware to new & unique opportunities thereby empowering them to make informed decisions for their future. I want them to be ‘enthralled’. WORKSHOP AT PARIKRMA
  • 33. 33 workshopat parikrmWORKSHOP AT PARIKRMA INTRODUCTORY SESSION 34 FIRST SESSION 36 FIRST REVIEW DISCUSSION 41 THIRD SESSION 42 FOURTH SESSION 43 ART BASED PEDAGOGY- SOULCOLLAGE 45 FIFTH SESSION 46 EIGHTH SESSION 48 SECOND REVIEW DISCUSSION 51 SELF INTERPRETATION 52 EXPOSURE SESSIONS 53 TENTH SESSION 57 TWELFTH SESSION 59 FINAL SESSION 60 CONSOLIDATION OF RESEARCH 61 THIRD REVIEW DISCUSSION 62
  • 34. 34 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONS WORKSHOP WITH PARIKRMA- INTRODUCTORY SESSION | 2nd July, 2010 This was my first session with the 13 kids at Parikrma from Grade 7. These were children who were staying in and around the neighbourhood. They usually stayed back in school willingly to finish their assignments or play games. I take sessions thrice a week for 2 months. I introduced myself & showed them the presentation on my laptop. They crowded around me hoping to catch a glimpse. I showed them the bag and asked them, “What do you see?” Evidently all of them screamed, “A bag!” in unison. I told them to look beyond it just being a bag. And rightfully one boy said they could see a face & shapes. I explained to them that that was what I was there for, to find those many ‘faces’ (interests) lay hidden in each of them. “Has anyone eaten a Pizza?” They all screamed that they had in class one time. I told them that we were going to me making a pizza with each of them, we were going to grind and combine things and ‘Do the Mixie’. After the presentation, I asked each of them what they wanted to be when they grew up. Most of them wanted to join the Indian Administration Service, some wanted to be Doctors & Air hostesses. A few still hadn’t made up their minds. I then asked them to take that and put it in a hiding place locked up in their mind, and come to their first class with an open mind. They all agreed, promising them the most important thing was to have fun. WORKSHOP AT PARIKRMA | INTRODUCTORY SESSION
  • 35. 35 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONSWORKSHOP AT PARIKRMA | INTRODUCTORY SESSION
  • 36. 36 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONS WORKSHOP WITH PARIKRMA- FIRST SESSION ‘INTEREST PIZZA’ | 7th July, 2010 To begin, I gave them each a sheet of paper and asked them to write their name, age, where they lived and what they wanted to be when they grow up. I then collected it & put it away. I was reading The Art of Looking Sideways by Alan Fletcher, and many ideas came to mind. When I came across the pizza in the ‘Improvisation’ section, this most certainly gave me an idea. I gave them circular sheets of ivory and told them that they were going to make a pizza, of their interests. I provided them with paper toppings- cheese, basil & tomato, and they had a little trouble coming up with interests, so I posed questions like- Who likes making rangoli? Who likes football? They did confuse interests with what they ‘like’- Ketchup, John Cena (wrestler), Jumping. Some children were placed in groups of 2 and shared the space on the circular sheet. Each child’s pizza was placed in a orderly arrangement. There weren’t enough toppings to fill the sheet and I had only an hour each session, but I was happy it worked out so well. I still have to get their permission to put pictures of the children, so for now I’m showing you Class Saturn (7th grade) Interest Pizzas in my next post. WORKSHOP AT PARIKRMA | FIRST SESSION
  • 37. 37 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONS WORKSHOP WITH PARIKRMA- FIRST SESSION ‘INTEREST PIZZA’ | 7th July, 2010 WORKSHOP AT PARIKRMA | FIRST SESSION
  • 38. 38
  • 39. 39 The toppings for the Interest pizza as well as the visual motif.
  • 40. 40 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONS WORKSHOP WITH PARIKRMA- FIRST SESSION ‘INTEREST PIZZA’ | 7th July, 2010 ‘Interest Pizzas’ of Class Saturn, 7th Grade WORKSHOP AT PARIKRMA | FIRST SESSION
  • 41. 41 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONSWORKSHOP AT PARIKRMA | FIRST REVIEW DISCUSSION First Review Discussion Geetanjali Sachdev, Kalpana, Mr. Morlidhar (Srishti School of Art, Design & Technology) It is necessary for you to understand what their aspirations are. They might already think they can do Art, Cooking etc- their realization that they can’t do it and do only Science, Engineering, etc. might come much later at the age of 16. Are you considering an older age group? The proposal needs to be clear of your role- Make them more aware- for them to be empowered to finally say “I don’t want to do only Science.” The rest are just the layers. Include them in the process. Become their equal. How? You could give them the camera to shoot, or take pictures, ask them to upload something on the blog, etc. Find patterns & put them in categories- what excites them and engages them. The end product could be an online curriculum that schools can take forward without you. Think about Access if you are thinking online. The fact that you are there, is enthralling enough for these children. You think these various ideas/concepts enthrall them, but have you asked them their point of view? Knowing this might give you some clarity. For them their aspirations are their means to livelihood. Telling them to forget about it and to look out for these new ideas/ concepts is all well and good but to them it might not make a difference. How will you counter that? You need to understand their priorities- Employment vs. Livelihood.
  • 42. 42 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONS WORKSHOP WITH PARIKRMA- THIRD SESSION ‘AM I ENTHRALLED? ENTHRALL ME’ | 14th July, 2010 This was my third session with them, and after my first review I had realized that Kalpana had a point- I was really showing them things that ‘I’ thought would enthrall them. I was ignorant to the fact that they also had a say. So I explained to them that each time I showed them something, they should ask themselves if they were ’enthralled’. I explained its meaning & that I wanted to get to know them better- what enthralled or excited them? By now I had remembered all their names and they would be extremely pleased whenever I answered their “What’s my name?” correctly. My next plan of action (POA) was to allow each of them to use the camera and record as I interviewed their friend, something that Geetu had suggested from the review. WORKSHOP AT PARIKRMA | THIRD SESSION
  • 43. 43 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONS WORKSHOP WITH PARIKRMA- FOURTH SESSION ‘I AM ENTHRALLED BY..’ | 16th July, 2010 BRAIN OVERLOAD Each of them were really excited to work with the camera. Some of them gave advice on where we should sit and what sort of background we should sit against. I helped each of them figure out how to start & stop recording and sat with their ‘Interest Pizzas’. I asked them about their families and what they do for a living; I asked them if they remembered the last time they were really excited about something, and they all seemed very humble- Seeing a waterfall on a picnic, being surprised with a new shirt on one’s birthday; I also asked them what they really wanted to know more about. Some said Science, one boy said he wanted to know about all the dogs in the world. I’m trying to get Parikrma’s permission to use the children’s videos and pictures. Will update that as soon as they agree. There were a million things on my mind. On the one hand, there were the children’s aspirations, their interests and what they wanted me to tell them more about; and on the other I had so many ideas and opportunities I was coming across that I didn’t know how and where to begin. So I doodled. Didn’t help but typography always makes me feel better. WORKSHOP AT PARIKRMA | FOURTH SESSION
  • 44. 44 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONS
  • 45. 45 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONS Art Based Pedagogy- SoulCollage Geetu had suggested I research Art Based Pedagogy & Methodology so I could facilitate the process. I looked into it. Pedagogy refers to strategies of instruction, or a style of instruction. For example, Paulo Freire referred to his method of teaching as Critical Pedagogy. In correlation to the instruction strategies the instructor’s own beliefs on instruction are harboured by the student’s knowledge and experience, situation and environment as well as learning goals set by the student and the teacher. (Wikipedia) Art Based Pedagogy is instruction through art-based methodology like dance, theatre, painting, singing, story-telling, etc. Last year I was in a Toy Lab meaning to create creative & better play experiences for children. We attended a conference held by IIT Mumbai called Designing for Children, with focus on Play and Learn. There was this one project by a woman called Adele Bass, Art Centre College of Design, USA, who had WORKSHOP AT PARIKRMA | ART BASED PEDAGOGY- SOULCOLLAGE explored with a process called SoulCollage to encourage right- brain thinking in children. SoulCollage, a method developed by Seena B. Frost, involves creating a deck of cards using collaged images- “Collage of our souls.” The images are constrained to an 8”x5” card, creating a self-imposed size and shape limitation. The cards are arranged in four suites creating an organization for the primary purpose of self-exploration and self-acceptance. Assemblage allows even the youngest children to create interesting and exciting images allow a new range of expression, regardless of artistic talent. One very important aspect of this process is the child himself/herself interprets their own collage therefore allowing them to understand aspects of oneself through the “I am one who..” exercise. The Cut & Paste technique is also a successful participative design tool. Each card represents a significant part of your life: • A part of your inner self • A person who supports you or loves you • An animal that has a special power/ energy to give you • A mythical figure which guides you Process art became a pathway to creativity. I decided to try this technique with the kids.
  • 46. 46 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONS WORKSHOP WITH PARIKRMA- FIFTH SESSION ‘SoulCollage TECHNIQUE’ | 21st July, 2010 I thought Seena Frost’s method of SoulCollage would be a great way to get to know them better. I hadn’t given them an activity since the ‘Interest Pizza’ so I decided to indulge them in this technique. I gave them 5”/8” sized blank cards and magazines. I asked them to collect pictures that they liked and asked them to stick it on the blank pieces of card I had given them. There weren’t enough scissors and glue so it took quite a while. This exercise brought out many characteristics of every child. One of the girls, Krupa, wanted to paste pictures of only girls and ‘nice’ ones. The boys’ collages looked very masculine, filled with sports WORKSHOP AT PARIKRMA | FIFTH SESSION
  • 47. 47 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONS WORKSHOP WITH PARIKRMA- FIFTH SESSION ‘SoulCollage TECHNIQUE’ | 21st July, 2010 WORKSHOP AT PARIKRMA | FIFTH SESSION cars and body-builders. It was a fun activity. The children created 14 collages, 6 of which I am posting here and the rest in my next post. After the session, one of the girls, Meghashree, came up to me and asked me that she was very curious about how snakes laid eggs. She had asked her Science teacher about it and the teacher said that she would try and find out if possible. It seems like I am beginning to be their closest & fastest source for information.
  • 48. 48 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONS WORKSHOP WITH PARIKRMA- EIGHTH SESSION ‘MIXING ASPIRATIONS WITH INTERESTS’ | 2nd AUGUST, 2010 Today I had planned to do another session of collage with the children, by letting them combine what they wanted to be when they grew up (Aspirations) and their Interests on their ‘Interest Pizzas’ for e.g. An air hostess who sings. This idea was then communicated through collage. I wanted them to put two & two together, creating alternate professions- bizarre, weird. I gave them a lot more freedom this time, suggesting that they could stick pictures, draw, colour or write things. Most of them didn’t understand the exercise. They kept coming to me asking me to explain it again. I kept thinking to myself that maybe I had framed the sentence wrong. I maybe should have used words like ‘connect’ ‘mix’, ‘add’ instead of ‘combine’- something they could relate to. The brief for the exercise needs to be comprehended by all- something I need to keep in mind for my final content. So I went to each of them and explained how to combine their own interests with their aspirations. Some stuck to the example I gave them and couldn’t think of anymore by themselves. As I asked a few of them what they wanted to be when they grew up, some seemed to have changed their professions from the last time I interviewed them. The boys seemed very disinterested and a few went out to play or were busy finishing their homework. A handful seemed to have understood. I wanted the children to interpret the collages themselves, made in the Fifth Session, following the same process in my Fourth Session with them and their ‘Interest Pizzas’. I asked one child to record while asking the other child more about his collage. Taking Kalpana’s suggestion to keep the question unbiased, I stated the question to them as, “(Name) this is your card. Tell me about it… Tell me more.” Some didn’t have much to say, whereas others explained every single detail until they didn’t have anything more to add. I found it hard not to ask them why they chose this celebrity or why they chose the colour pink, or why there weren’t any boys in their collage, etc. I didn’t know if that was right and I expected them to tell me anyway. WORKSHOP AT PARIKRMA | EIGHTH SESSION
  • 49. 49 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONSWORKSHOP AT PARIKRMA | EIGHTH SESSION
  • 50. 50 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONSWORKSHOP AT PARIKRMA | EIGHTH SESSION
  • 51. 51 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONSWORKSHOP AT PARIKRMA | SECOND REVIEW DISCUSSION Second Review Discussion Geetanjali Sachdev, Kalpana, Mr. Morlidhar (Srishti School of Art, Design & Technology) When asking a child to interpret anything, it is very important how you ask a child the question. Even the slightest wince can be understood by a child, which can be very disheartening. One’s tone should be unbiased. Frame the question for example, “This is your card. Tell me about it.. Tell me more..” This might be an effective way to let the child express his/her collage verbally. Find patterns within the art works and collages made by the children. Model a way of possibility where they themselves generate a process which can then be handed down from once class to another. Find out what print-based games/play tools they interact with. You could appropriate your content within that.
  • 52. 52 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONS Self Interpretation in Collage Process Self interpretation plays a key role in the collage process. A child may express something about her card that a facilitator might overlook. This dialogue gives the facilitator insight into how much a child knows about what he wants to be in life, the things he doesn’t have, things he owns, etc. Kavitha’s Interpretation | “I like my card. I have two girls. Film actors. I have a lotus. I like my card because it has full pictures. I have a picture of a doll. This is a dollar of money. This is the centre of dollar. I have a doll as a dog. It is pink in colour. It has many flowers. It is very beautiful. I have a lotus in red and pink mixture. It looks nice. I like this girl because she is very nice. She is like me.” Gayatri’s Interpretation | “This is banana. I like to eat bananas. I like to wear these clothes. This is the sauce, samosa sauce. I like to wear earrings and this is the design of that. And this is a ring & this is the pot. It is so nice. And juice bottle. I like to drink juices. I like wearing rings. In my house I don’t have any pots. I like to keep my house like this.” WORKSHOP AT PARIKRMA | SELF INTERPRETATION
  • 53. 53 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONS WORKSHOP WITH PARIKRMA- EXPOSURE SESSIONS WORKSHOP AT PARIKRMA | EXPOSURE SESSIONS From their ‘Interest Pizzas’, a few were really interested in acrobatics, sports as well as play. So I combined the three and talked about Parkour- a free running sport started in France, where one overcomes any obstacle within one’s path by adapting one’s movements to the environment. I asked them to imagine if the city, the buildings, parks and everything around them was their playground- what would they do? I screened ‘Jump Britain’ for them to see for themselves. The boys and some girls were really engrossed in the documentary, going back to the same scene again & again analyzing the movements carefully. A few even observed how some movements mimicked animals. A handful were bored and distracted (it is easier screening anything in batches). After the movie some of the boys tried it around the room and it seems like I have a few traceur/traceuse (practitioner of Parkour) in my class already. My goal for showing them this was that a sport like this (or any new idea) can be created by just combining one’s passions and interests, much like Sebastien Foucan (Founder of Parkour & Free Running) who started jumping and running with his friends off the benches in France in his youth. Parkour was a hit! One boy, Prathap, was talking about it nonstop like this sport was his calling. Him and a few other boys wanted to watch the movie again. I said another time. So just before class commenced, they made me record while they tried some tricks around the room again. I then asked if any of them have ever copied from anyone/ anything before. Most of them said yes. I then asked them if they thought copying was good? 3 out of 13 thought it was bad. I explained the term Biomimicry to them showing them a few examples. A great insight they gained was when they connected how in Parkour (the movie about free running), one of the leaps had copied cats. One girl, Asha, aspired to be an Engineer and what better example than to show one of the very first engineers- Nature. But she didn’t seem so interested. Some children are part of the Nature Club so this really interested them. These were the examples I showed them & as expected they had numerous questions- What? Why? How? I then showed them a talk by Janine Benyus at TED called Biomimicry in Action. They kept enquiring which animal that was, or what that name meant. Very inquisitive. In the end, I asked them to keep in mind that if there was ever a problem, they should ask themselves ‘what would nature do?’
  • 54. 55 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONS WORKSHOP WITH PARIKRMA- EXPOSURE SESSIONS WORKSHOP AT PARIKRMA | EXPOSURE SESSIONS From the collages the children made from the ‘Aspirations + Interests’ session, I picked two collages which showed a Bharatnatyam dancer and below that the child had written “She is fighting like a karate”, and another that said “They are dancing like a monkey.” So I chose to introduce them to Attakalari Centre for Movement Arts and the 2 forms of dance combined with martial arts- Kalarippayattu & Capoeira. When I mentioned Attakalari, all of them had heard of it. A person had come once to show them a few movements like Bharatnatyam and a few forms of martial arts. I asked them what martial arts techniques they already knew of. Some didn’t know what martial arts meant and after I had explained it to them they started naming a few like Karate, Tkiaondo, Jujitsu etc. I then asked them what dance forms they were familiar with and they answered quite a few like hip hop, Kathakali, etc. I questioned “What do you get when you put dance and martial arts together?” and after a few guesses, I introduced them to Kalarippayattu & Capoeira. I showed them 2 documentaries on each- ‘Indian Warrior’ (The history and philosophy of Kalarippayuttu) & ‘Freedom Fighting- A Capoeira Documentary’. They were interested in the first one, especially the boys but the girls didn’t want to watch. One boy noticed how similar it was to Parkour. By the time I showed them the Capoeira documentary, I had only a handful of interested viewers. But they were quite involved and one child said that dance and fighting should be called ‘Daight’ . One girl wanted to know how to apply to become an IAS officer and I said I would find out and let her know. She also told me that they were taking part in a quiz and the quiz master had Bill Gates’ face on the screen and asked who knew who this personality was. Her and another boy from my class took a wild guess and answered “the man who started the library of human imagination (Jay Walker- someone I had exposed them to in the first class)” but they couldn’t recognize him, neither could they recognize Vijay Mallya. She said they barely have anytime to find out or know about these kind of things because of homework and exams. I did forget to mention however that Attakkalari provides limited scholarships to talented and interested students from underprivileged backgrounds. It’s getting harder to become their facilitator AND their friend
  • 55. 56 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONS WORKSHOP WITH PARIKRMA- EXPOSURE SESSIONS WORKSHOP AT PARIKRMA | EXPOSURE SESSIONS In most of their collages the children have used pictures of nature and animals. Some of them are part of Nature & Science Clubs in school, so in this session I chose to talk about Veterinary Sciences and other opportunities with understanding animals. I posed a question- “How intelligent are animals as compared to humans?” Most of them thought animals were much more intelligent than humans. I then asked them if they thought we could talk to animals? Most of them said it wasn’t possible. They stated that animals can understand what we tell them but we can’t understand their language, which was true and a great insight. So I combined some of their interests and introduced them to Veterinary Science. I also told them that lots of people believe they can talk to animals- an Animal Communicator or Animal Whisperer. I planned to screen ‘Dr. Dolittle (1967)’ but they didn’t have the patience. Another amazing field was Zoo Musicology- study the music animals make and also affect their behaviour with music. I made them listen to a sound-clip of a Humpback Whale and they were amazed. At one point the resonance made the speakers move on the table and they wanted to see that happen again. This excited them even more. I asked them what they thought it was saying? One said that he was crying for help, another said that it was calling to its other friends. I then made them listen to another sound clip of composers who have mimicked the sounds of birds with instruments to produce a certain emotion. One of them told me that when they go for Bird watching, they are told to hear certain sounds to recognize the various species. I then asked if they thought birds were smart, especially crows. They said they were and I showed them a TED talk by Joshua Klien who had researched the behaviour of crows to prove that they were as smart as chimpanzees therefore training them to benefit humans. I also talked about Palaeontology one of their interests was digging- and I showed them another TED talk by Paul Sereno and finding the largest species of Crocodile. They were fascinated at the thought of an animal so large that its lower jaw measured more than 15 ft. One of the girls had watched it on the Discovery Channel and one by one they mentioned something they had seen at home on the Discovery Channel. I realized then that some of them had television sets with cable. They were not as unexposed as I thought they were. I screened Alfred Hitchcock’s ‘The Birds’ in the next class.
  • 56. 57 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONS WORKSHOP WITH PARIKRMA- TENTH SESSION ‘MEETING UPASANA AKKA’ | 6th AUGUST, 2010 WORKSHOP AT PARIKRMA | TENTH SESSION I wanted to introduce them to a friend of mine who works in the Aviation sector as an Airhostess for Kingfisher Airlines, Upasana Bijoor. Many of the girls wanted to become air hostesses when they grew up and I wanted any questions they had answered. I sat with Upasana and made a presentation that I would show to the kids. I showed them a picture of Vijay Mallya, asking them if they knew who he was. They knew his name but didn’t know he which company he owned. I picked 2 collages which said that, “An Airhostess is a bird flying in the sky” and another that said, “An Airhostess is a Nature Love.” The girls were excited and so were some of the boys who wanted to become pilots. I explained to Upasana that their goal to become Airhostesses was to help people/friends/passengers, contradictory to the belief that the main reason one becomes an Airhostess, was to travel the world. I wanted 3 questions to be asked. So I asked 3 children to ask her “When did she know she wanted to become an Air hostess?”, “What does an Air hostess do?” & “What interests must one have to become an Air hostess?” Even after answering these questions they wanted their own questions answered. They wanted to know all the places she had travelled to, how many passengers did she had to serve, how one becomes an Air hostess, etc. Another point I wanted them to keep in mind was that as long as you are a 12th grade pass, anyone can strive to become one. I didn’t want the boys to feel left out so I asked her to share with them
  • 57. 58 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONSWORKSHOP AT PARIKRMA | TENTH SESSION various other unique facets of Aviation- Sky Marshall (a person trained in mortal combat, disguised as a normal passenger, to come into action if and when there is a hijack of the plane) if one is interested in martial arts and aviation, A ground staff agent (a person solely made to talk and interact with passengers) if one is interested in talking and making conversation or even An instructor in Aviation if one is interested in teaching, etc. I had told her to be honest about how she came about becoming one. She told the kids that she had always thought she wanted to work in Hotel Management, and when she finally did study for it, she lost interest in it because it wasn’t what she expected. She then became an Air hostess and now is highly interested in Make-up. I made an ‘Interest Pizza’ of her interests to show the kids. Before class I asked her if anyone had ever managed to work as an air hostess and a pilot, and she had said that that was a possibility. I then tried coming up with other job profiles by combining her interests- A make-up artist for flight crew, an in-flight chef, an in-flight bartender, etc- most of these do not exist but could certainly in the future. They wanted to know about the adventures she had had, what happens if there was a crash, etc. It was quite an eye opening experience for them.
  • 58. 59 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONSWORKSHOP AT PARIKRMA | TWELFTH SESSION These children love sports and playing sports. Especially Football. So I had a friend of mine, Vishvan Saran, a sport event management consultant come and talk to the enthusiastic lot. He and his family own SPT Sports Consultants in Bangalore. They host events and also have a football academy where they train children from rural villages who are truly interested in football. I had mentioned him in the last class so the kids were definitely very excited. Some of the boys who used to come late to class were bang on time. He really wanted to stress on the fact that whatever their aspirations were, the various facets in Sports has no limits. For example, one of their interests was writing, so he pointed out that one could be a sports journalist and write/evaluate games. Another one of their interests was reading and he highlighted that one could become a sports analyst who reads the performance of various athletes and tells them what’s wrong or right or how they should move to perform better. He even gave an example of a Sports Engineer. Like the time when they met Upasana akka, they had many questions. I had organized a sports quiz for them to see if they knew any Indian sportsmen and women. But all they wanted to do was play. So we decided to have a game of football. Vishvan turned to me later and said that one boy, Chiranjeevi, seemed so enthusiastic that he felt bad that the football coaching centre was so far away. I had asked him at what age children need to start being coached, and he said the earlier the better. I kept telling Chiranjeevi to never give up on his dream. This was going to be my last session with them and I was dreading leaving them. WORKSHOP WITH PARIKRMA- TWELFTH SESSION ‘MEETING VISHVAN ANNA’ | 9th AUGUST, 2010
  • 59. 60 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONS WORKSHOP WITH PARIKRMA- FINAL SESSION ‘BE WHAT YOU LOVE’ | 11th AUGUST, 2010 This was my last session with the children. I wanted to know if they had really understood what I was doing here. I asked them which their favourite sessions were. Parkour was a big hit as well as meeting Upasana Akka & Vishvan Anna. I asked them what they had learnt and one by one they named the things that I had showed them. One of them even mentioned ‘The Mixie’. Meghashree very lovingly said that they were highly impressed with me. I was someone who showed them things that THEY liked. She was definitely “enthralled!” I told them to remember that they CAN be whatever they wanted. If they loved it and were passionate about something they should go ahead and do it. I told them not to be afraid to change their minds. It was OK to want to be a Doctor and then change ones mind because they didn’t like it. Anything was possible. And as I had expected, the most important question came up- “But what if we are poor akka?” I told them that as long as they finished school, they could do anything. At every session, they were obsessed with Shakira’s song for the World Cup 2010- Waka Waka. It was like a energy- boost for them. They wanted to see the video, and when I showed it to them they would watch it numerous times over again, screaming at the top of their lungs. WORKSHOP AT PARIKRMA | FINAL SESSION
  • 60. 61 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONS Consolidation of Research WORKSHOP AT PARIKRMA | CONSOLIDATION OF RESEARCH Several insights have been established after the twelve sessions I conducted at Parikrma. I’ve learnt so much about each child from the collages they made, from the SoulCollage technique as well as mixing their Interests & Aspirations session. A few evident patterns that I found were: • Recurring themes of Masculinity, Speed & Sports amongst the boys. • Recurring themes of Femininity, Beauty, Pretty amongst the girls. • More Aware of the possibility of professions doing much more than they are subjected to. • Poverty is one factor that looms large over everything- “What if we are poor?” • Their families are their number one priority. • They are exposed to an extent- They own television sets with cable and also make a trip to the Cyber Cafe every once in 2-3 months. Some were more deeply rooted. This could only be inferred from the collages the children made. • The recurring theme of Service- help others, teach children, serve friends & family. • They depict attributes of the celebrity or icon in themselves or vice-versa- “I like this girl because she is very nice. She is like me,” or “I like her because she is looking like me.” Sometimes the attribute is the same as their interest- Football, Bharatnatyam or Dance in general. • They associate their likes to a particular object- “I love to wear a ring,” or “I like to drink juices,” or “I like to wear these clothes.” • They visualize themselves in that particular scenario- “I should win a cup in the match,” or “He is celebrating that I hit the goal.” • They include the absence of objects and their want for those objects- “This is a picture of a pot. In my house I don’t have any pots.” (The facilitator could maybe have a class in Pottery) • Eager to find out the process towards the goal- ‘how to get there?’ or ‘how does one become this/that?’ • Bollywood celebrities and models. International football players, Indian cricketers. • The Visualization must be followed by a Verbal dialogue and should be repeated. Recurring themes that dominated most of the collages, I AM him/her I CAN do this I DON’T HAVE this I HAVE this I LIKE this/that
  • 61. 62 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONSWORKSHOP AT PARIKRMA | THIRD REVIEW DISCUSSION Third Review Discussion Geetanjali Sachdev, Kalpana, Mr. Morlidhar (Srishti School of Art, Design & Technology) Give vision to the children’s desires. Don’t let it be at the level of the word. Once you take it beyond the form you can take it within a context. The ‘fantastical’. Look up Design Synectics. Start reflecting on your research from the point of view as a designer. How does this apply to you as a designer? How will this information be of value to you now? Combine the individual references to become a part of the larger data you present. Think of implications of your practice- if you were to redo this, what would you do differently? What fascinated you? Consolidate and take it further. Present your research and your implications for practice. Break some boundaries. Do what you feel like doing. Decide on an audience. It can’t be for both teachers and children. A teacher has a fundamentally different need from this information. If it is for a child, it could act as a story or a thought provoking anecdote. But it would be of value to teachers because of the process you followed. Make a list in terms of deliverables. In your progressive statement, state the possibilities of opportunities to take it further and another form has to come out of it. Read up on the Four Dimensions of Experience. Understand the difference between Context, the container, within which you pour Content. Readings: John Dewey’s Theory of Experience- Learning as an Aesthetic Experience. You learning has been highlighted from your presentation. You have been enthralled - Do you think you have achieved your goal to enthrall the children? There needs to be some qualitative, quantitative evidence of some sort. The process has been an educational journey for you but your vision is about them. Video documentation might bring that up. Create a dialogue by asking them to tell a story. Take it off the child. Move it out of their framework- no limitations- out of their economic context. You need to take it off the teacher as well. Next step- Structure your content. You were the instrument for this and now the teacher becomes the instrument. This is valuable market research on how children think. Don’t get worried about the form now. Decide what the content is. Usability is key if that is your main objective. Keep your form simple. Teachers will engage with content. Prototyping your tool with teachers. You have to now become the observer. Abandon all control if you really want to know if it works. Even if she doesn’t like it, that is an invitation that you need to rework something in your tool and then build upon it. Find 2 or more teachers who will use it- the more you see how your tool works, the more you will understand. Make it a genuine exploration.
  • 62. 63 ‘I’m not what has happened to me: I am what I choose to become.’ Carl Jung
  • 63. 64 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONS The Four Dimension of Experience (Based on an article ‘4 Dimension of Experience’ by Scott Gould) Experience is more readily defined in terms of old and new when we consider it in everyday life- active or passive, transitional or situational. Essentially we are talking about Familiarity. Below is the theory of the four dimensions of experience, expounded the idea of familiarity in experience. The context is the container within which the content is placed, e.g. A cinema hall and the action of going to the cinema is context. The choice of the movie is the content. Both content and context can either be old or new in terms of familiarity. CONTEXT & CONTENT IS NEW, this leads to unfamiliarity causing Exposure. The hallmark of exposure is ‘firsts’. CONTEXT IS OLD & CONTENT IS NEW, back to our movie analogy- the act of going to the cinema is old but the film that is being watched is new. When the environment is controlled or familiar, the experience is an Experiment. CONTEXT IS NEW & CONTENT IS OLD, the content of the film is expressed through a play or a musical. The framework remains the same but the Expression is different. Finally, CONTEXT & CONTENT IS OLD is the valid experience of Extension. Extending that experience by ‘re-experiencing’ or ‘re-visiting’ nostalgia. A concert is a perfect example of a performer employing the four dimensions: Expression. The recent hit will be performed but in a new tempo or with new instruments. Experiment. A new song is performed that the crowd is not familiar with but the experience of hearing a totally new song is very memorable. Extension. Of course, a famous number will be sung exactly as it is remembered as the audience partake in mass-karaoke. Exposure. Whist many of the audience will have attended a concert before, there will be those who are attending their very first. This will have a special place in their hearts and the performer now gains a life-long fan. THE PROTOTYPE | FOUR DIMENSION OF EXPERIENCE
  • 64. 65 the prototypeTHE PROTOTYPE FINAL REVIEW DISCUSSION 81 FINAL PROTOTYPE 82 PACKAGING 89 USER TESTING 92 THINKING OUT LOUD 66 INSPIRATION POOL- CARD DECK 68 I’CAN FIRST DRAFT 70 FOURTH REVIEW DISCUSSION 74 I’CAN SECOND DRAFT 75 NAME & LOGO EXPLORATION 76 FIFTH REVIEW SESSION 78 I’CAN THIRD DRAFT 79
  • 65. 66 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONS Thinking Out Loud (TOL)- STRUCTURE THE PROTOTYPE | THINKING OUT LOUD With the ‘research’ stage complete, I now have to start thinking about the ‘structure’ of my tool- What model is it based on? What is the content like? Who is it for? Are there activities? What are they? What are the elements within the tool-kit? Here are a few ideas of what the structure should look like and why it need be so. The Pizza of Interests | Why pizza? All children love it. We all relate to it no matter what age. The idea of customizing a pizza to one’s liking is fun. This can be done by giving one a choice of toppings- provide these in the tool kit with proper measurements so anyone can cut these out. A great idea would be providing stencils for each topping. A child’s interests are much like the toppings on a pizza, making them quite distinct from one another. This is an important aspect of the activity. Situational Triggers | These triggers set off new questions, a new environment, people, etc. therefore leading to new ideas. The SoulCollage Technique | An adaption of the SoulCollage technique could bring about a variety of insights. Participation | Some interactions are done in groups. A child could be entrusted with a camera to record another child’s rendition. They could also interpret someone else’s collage to bring light to what they see. Self Interpretation | A child may express something himself/ herself that could be overlooked. This plays a key role in the process. This could bring forth valuable insights into how much a child knows. This should be done after every collage session. Hybridization | The idea of fusing two or more elements together to form something new is key to play with the imagination. The Four Dimensions of Experience | The structure can be modelled on The Four Dimensions of Experience- Context & Content- new:new, new:old, old:new, old:old. The experience of Extension (Context & Content is old) What do you think your aspiration does for a living? A child’s understanding of what that profession does could be re-visited through facet of extension. This might be based on previous knowledge given by a family member practicing that profession or observations gained form the public media. This perception can then be added to, or rectified by a facilitator. The experience of Expression (Context is new, Content is old) Keeping the ‘Aspiration’ element constant (content), one keeps adding ‘Interests’ (context) by fusing them together (hybridization). They imagine new contexts. This could be triggered through questions- What his the name of your character? What does he/she do? How is his/her life? What objects is he/she identified with? Who are the people he/she interacts with? The process of thinking to communicating it through images- collage- to interpreting it with words also acts as a transfer through several contexts. Another idea that came up was if the child tears all images into halves and sticks any two together- a new being is created, a new profession to weave a story around. This falls under experimentation as well.
  • 66. 67 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONSTHE PROTOTYPE | THINKING OUT LOUD The experience of Exposure (Context & Content is new) This attempts to open a child’s mind to the numerous possibilities by making a child aware of the various facets of that profession shown through pictures, movies, documentaries, etc. From the collages made, the facilitator finds patterns within each collage and brings these imaginative futures down to earth, making them aware of the existence of that profession. This should be done subsequent to every collage session after consolidating the interpretations. The experience of Experimentation (Context is old, Content is new) Interpreting someone else’s collage could be interesting. What does he/she see in my collage? New content in created by someone else.
  • 67. 68 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONS Inspiration Pool | Card Deck While working on the content for the tool, I was scouting for some ideas for the form. I wanted to design a pack of instruction cards that was simple to use and quick to read from. A few ideas came to mind. A Suite System much like the playing card decks- hearts, clubs, spades, diamonds. In this context, each suite will be one activity. In Tarot Cards, the headings for each card defines the role the person is in life- The Fool, The Magician, The High priestess, etc. Each card will have a similar heading that defines the role of a facilitator, therefore ‘taking it off the him/her’. I thought this would be a creative way to remove the teacher from their practical shell. Adding the collages the children made from the workshops at Parikrma, as examples for each activity. This would illustrate how the method was applied in a real life scenario. Testing the tool is essential for reflection. The collages done at this stage would then be used as examples for the final tool. “VETO is a trivia game designed to be easily brought on journeys. Its strong tin can design, laminated playing cards and fairly small dimensions (150 x 100 x 35mm) makes it ideal for travelling and backpacking through different climates.” (From lovelypackage. com) THE PROTOTYPE | INSPIRATION- CARD DECK
  • 68. 69 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONS IDEO Method Cards show 51 of the methods we use to inspire great design and keep people at the centre of our design process. Each card describes one method and includes a brief story about how and when to use it. The cards are divided into four categories: Learn, Look, Ask and Try, making it easy to reference, browse, sort, and share the cards. (From the IDEO website) THINKPAD This ingenious pack of brainstorming cards was developed to assist people in stimulating their creativity and foster new and different ideas. It is a great tool for coming up with creative ideas for developing new (or changing existing) products, services, names, businesses, processes, marketing materials, etc. —- anything you need to think about in fresh, new ways. (From creativethinking.net) THE PROTOTYPE | INSPIRATION- CARD DECK
  • 69. 70 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONS FIRST DRAFT | ‘I’CAN’ EDUCATIONAL TOOL FOR FACILITATORS THE PROTOTYPE | I’CAN FIRST DRAFT I’CAN is the first deck of 52 instructional cards which are ready for testing. This deck helps facilitate four activities, • Suite 1: The Pizza of Interests & Planes in the Sky Children write down their interests on the paper toppings given to them (Cheese, Tomato, Basil & Meat) and stick them on their pizza pies creating a pizza of their interests. Planes in the Sky is inspired by a mixed-media performance and workshop called ‘Paper Airplane Project’ by Indian visual artist Baptist Coelho. Here, children are asked to construct paper planes and complete the sentence, When I grow up, I would like to be..’. It is a way to encourage children to express themselves and visualize their dreams. • Suite 2: Aspirations The first collage session where children are asked to make a collage using the SoulCollage technique about what they think their aspiration does for a living. This if followed by a self interpretation exercise and an exposure session. A suite for Questions have also been provided to trigger dialogue between facilitator and child. • Suite 3: Interests+Aspirations In the second collage session, children are asked to make a collage- either connect their aspirations & interests, or connect their interests with one another. They mix and match different elements together to create ‘fantastical futures’ that they would want to be in. This is followed again by the self interpretation exercise and the exposure session. • Suite 4: Peer Interaction Here, children are asked to swap collages and interpret what they see in the peers’ collage. This is the followed by the exposure session. Finally, children are asked to repeat the Planes in the Sky activity and fly their dreams. This symbolises a promise to themselves of their future, a future that they knowingly have chosen for themselves. The visual language used here is deeply inspired by VETO. The visual motif and identity are the toppings from the Interest Pizzas. Each suite depicts the activity. Here are a few snapshots of me working on the initial identity and motif. CARD SPECIFICS (SPECS) The card deck was to contain introductory cards and a pack of regular activity cards. A regular set of tarot cards measure 2.76 in. x 4.72 in. and they get bigger from then on. I chose this size because it wasn’t too small and text could be easily be read from it. The introductory cards had to be double the size of one regular tarot card based on a 2-column grid providing a distinction through size. This could be easily held and provided a lovely shape.
  • 70. 71 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONSTHE PROTOTYPE | I’CAN FIRST DRAFT The Four Suites Adding content Card Specs
  • 71. 72 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONS FIRST DRAFT | ‘I’CAN’ EDUCATIONAL TOOL FOR FACILITATORS THE PROTOTYPE | I’CAN FIRST DRAFT
  • 72. 73 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONSTHE PROTOTYPE | I’CAN FIRST DRAFT
  • 73. 74 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONSTHE PROTOTYPE | FOURTH REVIEW DISCUSSION Fourth Review Discussion Geetanjali Sachdev, Kalpana, Mr. Morlidhar (Srishti School of Art, Design & Technology) A visual guideline/ visual categorization of each activity is needed for the facilitator to get a quick look at the process. A card breaker (an illustration or colour) after every activity to point out the end of one activity and the beginning of another- much like a recipe- Picture, Preparation time, Serves how many etc. Time is an important aspect. A general idea of how much time each activity might take must be included. Start testing as much as you can. This will add weight to the tool. Go back and forth to make necessary changes to help the facilitation process become more efficient. Examples of the final product after each activity would help- How does the final ‘Pizza of Interests’ look? Examples of collages taken from the testing stage must become a part of the tool. Consistency in terms of gender in the content- “him/her’ or ‘her’ or ‘him’. More hierarchy in terms of typography between the Aim, Materials needed & Activity. Think about the stock to use for the final cards, keeping in mind dirt, thickness, lamination, etc. Have your final visual identity set by the end of this week- Logo, Visuals language. Start thinking about the packaging- simple and durable.
  • 74. 75 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONS SECOND DRAFT | ‘I’CAN’ EDUCATIONAL TOOL FOR FACILITATORS THE PROTOTYPE | I’CAN SECOND DRAFT From the feedback I got from my last review, the deck clearly needed a visual guideline to give the facilitator a quick preview of how she/her should go about the process. I designed a ‘Process’ card in such a way that it provided information about each activity, at the same time visually guiding the facilitator through each. I also designed four card breakers before each activity to help the facilitator know when to move onto the next activity. The pictures in the slideshow show that segregation clearly.
  • 75. 76 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONS SECOND DRAFT | NAME AND LOGO EXPLORATION FOR EDUCATIONAL TOOL FOR FACILITATORS THE PROTOTYPE | NAME & LOGO EXPLORATION I decided to come up with more names that were fun & catchy. They also needed to reflect the idea behind the tool. The two names I narrowed down to were, PIE IN SKY According to the dictionary, the phrase ‘Pie in the Sky’ is informally used to describe or refer to something that is pleasant to contemplate but is very unlikely to be realised. Some synonyms similar to this phrase- false hope, illusion, delusion, fantasy, pipe dream, daydream, a castle in the air, a castle in Spain. My intention is to flip this meaning and bring these fantasies to life. The word ‘pie’ also works as a pun relating to the pizza pies the children make with their ‘Interest Pizzas’. JIM JAM According to the dictionary, it’s a noun that indicates a fit of depression or nervousness. It has a fun ring to it. Someone also added- “I work for my bread & butter, but I will always have my jam”. It relates to a cream-jelly biscuit as well. As for my tool, I wanted it to have a magical tone to it- “JIM JAM.. I AM a Chocolate Maker.” Using it much like the word ‘abracadabra’. The logo also has a play on the word ‘I AM’. PIEin SKY in
  • 76. 77 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONS SECOND DRAFT | NAME AND LOGO EXPLORATION FOR EDUCATIONAL TOOL FOR FACILITATORS THE PROTOTYPE | NAME & LOGO EXPLORATION Logo I wanted to keep it simple. Plain type does justice to the name. Some said the box was too restricting. Much like a postage stamp. I tried it without the box and it started looking more like jam. Others said that the box established hierarchy. I liked the I’CAN logo confined to a box and JIM JAM without. After testing my cards, I narrowed it down to JIM JAM & I’CAN. The children liked the name I’CAN because they said they could relate it with the activities. So I stuck to my very first idea. The slideshow shows these logos in print. Explorations in Print
  • 77. 78 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONSTHE PROTOTYPE | FIFTH REVIEW DISCUSSION Fifth Review Discussion Geetanjali Sachdev, Kalpana, Mr. Morlidhar (Srishti School of Art, Design & Technology) Find common patterns from the workshops done at Parikrma and the testing of your final tool. Gain further insights & hooks you can add to know that you have accomplished your brief. In terms of content- The assumptions being made are very strong. As a teacher in a classroom of 30 students, clarity and navigation of instruction is key. It needs to be articulate not only through words, but visually as well. This helps in similarity of location and grammar both, keeping the same logic of explanation. Direct the user’s attention in a linear fashion through the same. State your reason for it. The content refers to two separate times- the preparation time before the activity and the activity itself. Separate these. Have a material list for the teacher to refer to before commencing any activity. This could be done by experimenting with the size of cards. Visually, left alignment of text is easier to read and adjust in comparison to justified. What is your rationale for having the tool in the form of cards? If the information is linear, the form does not match the function. It looks more like a gimmick. Find another form. Your main rationale here is ease for the teacher/facilitator. Having so many cards is confusing. Each activity seems to take an hour to complete. Sequence each sheet to be one hour worth of that activity. That way the teacher has one whole hour in her hand. Simplify. Edit your copy. Do not make absolute statements.
  • 78. 79 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONS THIRD DRAFT | ‘I’CAN’ EDUCATIONAL TOOL FOR FACILITATORS THE PROTOTYPE | I’CAN THIRD DRAFT From 52 individual cards, I resized them to 15 large cards each containing one hour worth of instructions for one activity. Simplifying the copy was the challenging. Every aspect of instruction- preparation, introduction, activity details, estimated time, materials needed, etc. was now placed within a hierarchy. In terms of visual language, I did away with the integration of shapes and categorized each activity with solid colours. This allowed easy navigation. I discarded the numbering system hoping that visuals would be easier. The form was now simple and easy to function.
  • 79. 80 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONSTHE PROTOTYPE | I’CAN THIRD DRAFT
  • 80. 81 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONSTHE PROTOTYPE | FINAL REVIEW DISCUSSION Final Review Discussion Geetanjali Sachdev, Kalpana, Mr. Morlidhar (Srishti School of Art, Design & Technology) It gets difficult to navigate through the deck without sequential numbers. It’s hard to find out which cards comes first if one is solely dependent on the visual navigation. Abbreviations are not needed- SI (Self Interpretation), WW (Window to the World). Use the full names. Avoid using absolute sentences based on your assumptions. Use words like ‘attempt to’, ‘aims at’, etc. The visual tag for the first activity should be consistent with the rest. Try to incorporate consistency and include the examples in the end. Different between a session, an activity and an exercise. Be careful how you use these words. Your process needs to be highlighted. It is the most important aspect before your product- Research, Workshops, Structure, Product, User-Testing. Packaging- How about a window that displays the logo. It has a play on ‘window to the world’. Outline the graphic with black thin strokes all around the corrugated brown box. Have a small introduction of the tool is about at the back of your box. You could also have a custom carry bag. Detail is key. Straighten pictures, add outlines where necessary. Acknowledge yourself. You have designed this tool. Include it somewhere where everyone can see.
  • 81. 82 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONS FINAL PROTOTYPE WITH TEMPORARY PACKAGING| I’CAN EDUCATIONAL TOOL FOR FACILITATORS THE PROTOTYPE | FINAL PROTOTYPE I now present to you I’CAN, an educational tool for facilitators which aims at helping children recognise their interests & aspirations, making them aware of their windows to the world through the art of collage. This deck contains 15 cards, a deck of Question cards, a pack of Stencil toppings made from acrylic sheets and a box that dually works as a stand for the elements while facilitating the activities.
  • 82. 83 Temporary Packaging
  • 83. 84 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONS It dually works as a stand to hold the cards. THE PROTOTYPE | FINAL PROTOTYPE
  • 84. 85 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONSTHE PROTOTYPE | FINAL PROTOTYPE
  • 85. 86 THE PROTOTYPE | FINAL PROTOTYPE
  • 86. 87 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONS The acrylic Stencils and the ‘Questions’ deck THE PROTOTYPE | FINAL PROTOTYPE
  • 87. 88 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONS The ‘Cheese’ stencil THE PROTOTYPE | FINAL PROTOTYPE
  • 88. 89 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONS PACKAGING | I’CAN EDUCATION TOOL FOR FACILITATORS THE PROTOTYPE | PACKAGING Packaging is a very important aspect of any product, especially a product as simple as a deck of cards. I imagined I’CAN sitting on the shelves of libraries and educational retail stores, compact, easy to find, and eye-catching. Initially I wanted to design a tin box much like the VETO tin box. But the shape of the box had to be custom made to fit the deck and it’s ancillary products. I also wanted it to be light, durable, environment-friendly and functional. I decided to go with corrugated fibreboard. I had some waste board lying around and made a quick box. My biggest challenge however was sourcing this mil (thickness of sheet) of board & fine quality of corrugated fibreboard. Every paper store I visited in and around Ebrahim Street in Bangalore didn’t seem to stock this type of quality. An acquaintance who manufactures corrugated board lent a hand and supplied me with a few samples. The brown of the corrugated went beautifully with the colours. The slideshow presents a few initial explorations with the packaging of this tool and the final packaging that incorporated laser-cutting and engraving on corrugated fibreboard
  • 89. 90 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONS The front of the box THE PROTOTYPE | PACKAGING
  • 90. 91 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONS (Left) The back which opens, (above) Dually used as a stand to hold the cards and stencils during facilitation THE PROTOTYPE | PACKAGING
  • 91. 92 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONS USER TESTING OF I’CAN EDUCATION TOOL THE PROTOTYPE | USER TESTING I’CAN, the educational tool I designed to facilitate a collage process is finally ready for user testing. I had two prototypes ready in print that varied in shape and instruction. My aim was to have a facilitator use both to gain insight in terms of shape, form, instruction, ease, comprehension, etc. School was out. So I decided to use a parent. I think a parent is the next best thing to a teacher. They equally want to contribute to their child’s future, helping them fulfil their ambitions. I asked my aunt, Sonali Sanade, to help facilitate this process. Her daughter, Gauri, is 14 yrs. of age and her classmates Mrinali & Kadambari were willing to give the tool a go. This was done over a span of two days. DAY 1 | USER TESTING OF I’CAN DRAFT 1 I gave Sonali the first draft of I’CAN (draft one). I asked her to read though the instructions sequentially. She made them create their Pizza of Interests all the while interacting with them asking them why, “what about this interest?”, “that’s interesting”. She then moved onto the paper planes exercise. Here the girls went all out. They write more than one aspiration on each paper plane that they made. Some of them used the help of the diagram to construct their planes. Eventually they helped each other. Sonali would keep enquiring why they chose that aspiration & what they thought that aspiration did. This really created an atmosphere of interaction & dialogue. She would add to their rendition by saying “What about.. Did you know…”. My ‘fly on the wall’ role didn’t quite last. Sonali would read one card and wait for them to finish the instructions given to them on that card. They were too many for her to look at at one glance. They moved on to the first collage session with their aspirations. They were previously talking about it, and now they had to create a collage of the same. The girls had many questions. They seemed to always ask Sonali (an authority) if they could do ‘this’ or stick ‘that’. Mistakenly, Sonali mentioned that, “if someone had to look at your collage, it should tell them what your aspiration does through the images you stick.” This should not have been the case. It’s the child’s own interpretation. Her idea. I intervened here and told them so. The aspect of free thinking and ‘no wrong answers’ wasn’t clear to them. By the end of it, there were 6 collages. During the self interpretation session, the girls verbally talked about what they thought their aspiration did. They would point out one image at a time and state why they put it there. Because there were too many cards, Sonali didn’t understand that they had to weave a story around their collage. So she asked them to make up a quick story. From their interpretations, one could tell that they knew quite a but about for e,g, what a Social Worker does, or an Environmentalist does for a living. In comparison to the kids at Parikrma, they seemed much more exposed in terms of knowledge. The girls chose off beat career paths like Chef or Travel host as compared to the children in Parikrma who chose the regular streams like Engineer and Doctor. My one concern was if these activities were too childish for the girls. The girls didn’t think so but thought that younger kids would also benefit from it. They also mentioned that it definitely made
  • 92. 93 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONSTHE PROTOTYPE | USER TESTING them think a lot about what they want to do. They had never reflected on it so much. It also gave them insight about how much more that profession could do, because of Sonali’s inputs. But they weren’t very clear about the aim of this session. The fact that they brought up that question after realising how much they learnt form Sonali, is proof enough that the process fulfils what it is aimed to do. This session was an eye-opened for me. I understood the importance of the role the facilitator plays in this process. He/she needs to be non-judgmental, open, and approachable.
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  • 94. 95 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONS ‘Interest Pizzas’ Collages- Aspiration (Left) Paper planes “When I grow up, I would like to be...”, (Right) The collages THE PROTOTYPE | USER TESTING
  • 95. 96 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONS USER TESTING OF I’CAN DRAFT 1- FEEDBACK Facilitator | Sonali Sanade, Mother It is well structured. It started well. The first activity was the Pizza of Interests which was very general and an open activity. I think the girls became a little dreamy and things were very vague and up in the air. Then when we moved onto the Paper Planes exercise, it was narrowing down the field a bit. We were looking towards a direction and things were coming into focus. The collage activity, I think was looking at reality. It’s not just rosy pictures of exciting looking things or glamorous objects. We were getting into the actual nitty-gritty of daily life. So I think the structure is nice. I think it really got them thinking. They were getting really focussed. I liked that about the process. The intensity increases as you move up so that is something I liked. If I had probably sat and read the cards in advance, it would have been clearer. THE PROTOTYPE | USER TESTING
  • 96. 97 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONS USER TESTING OF I’CAN EDUCATION TOOL THE PROTOTYPE | USER TESTING DAY 2 | USER TESTING OF I’CAN FINAL PROTOTYPE This time I gave Sonali the final prototype of I’CAN (final prototype). She followed the same sequence from activity 3 and 4. She explained the instructions for the third activity but they didn’t understand it. I asked her to do it step by step. To collect the images first, make a pile, tear them all in halves and then stick any two together. Mrinali asked if she could just use her aspirations and not her interests and I mistakenly said yes she could. But the entire point of the activity is to include one’s interests. Sonali then shared with them the example card for the 3rd activity. She told them that there were different ways of fusing images together aside from tearing them in halves and sticking them together. She stressed on weaving a story around their collages. All the while, Sonali directed the set of questions several times so that they wouldn’t forget this time. I assumed they would make several collages when asked to use their imagination, but they all stuck to making just one. During the self interpretation session, it seemed as though the fantasy professions they were coming up with was very realistic. I asked them to think again and this time to use their imagination to the fullest. I stated that it didn’t have to exist. They thought again and the second time round Mrinali came up with a person who paints celebrities faces as stars in the sky. One of her interests was to look up at the stars in the sky, fusing that with an Entrepreneur. This seemed really interesting so I asked a few more questions about her story. When it came to the 4th activity, they were asked to switch collages. Sonali emphasized on coming up with a profession that is very different form the person’s interpretation of their own collage. This time Mrinali came up with a story about Kadambari’s collage, where a man uses shells to generate power much like Bio Mass. I then made her aware of Biomimicry- man mimicking nature to solve problems. This fascinated her and she shared with me that her uncle copied an insect to solve a problem. Kadambari & Gauri on the other hand had a little difficulty thinking outside the box but their second attempts were based on professions that already existed. This activity was quite fruitful. I realised they need a little nudge to open their minds a bit. In the end, they were still not sure what the goal of the process was. I explained that it was meant to open their minds about the facets of various professions and making you aware of things that they might never think existed. The fact that anything is possible. They suggested that the entire process would work efficiently in a school environment because different children would experience it once, otherwise doing every year would get very boring. It would also be interesting to come up with more activities which were more complex and turning it into a game. They liked listening to another person’s rendition of their collage, to understand what they see. I am truly grateful and I thank them for participating.
  • 97. 98 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONS Collages- Aspiration + Interests THE PROTOTYPE | USER TESTING
  • 98. 99 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONS USER TESTING OF I’CAN FINAL PROTOTYPE- FEEDBACK Facilitator | Sonali Sanade, Mother The form was much easier this time round. There were fewer cards. Last time I was focussing more on keeping them in order and constantly playing with that. If I wanted to go back to something the order would get spoilt and I didn’t want to mess that up. This time this was easier to handle and I found that I wasn’t looking at it so much because it’s condensed and more precise. I think the second session was very interesting. The idea of fusing two things together was very interesting. Also allowing a peer to interpret your collage was quite intriguing as well. You get to look into each child’s mind and you’ve stressed that the sky is the limit. So you can really see how imaginative they can be and at the same time it is tied to reality. They have to make a story about it which does lead to a profession. This time I saw that the structure let’s them loose but they have to land back which I thought was very nice. Using this tool has made me aware that I am very inadequately equipped. Things like Biomimicry is something that I’ve not even heard about. So according to me this needs to be handled by someone who is more aware of the wide spectrum of information. I think this was an excellent tool but the right facilitator would get the most out of it. As a parent I find that since I am from another generation there is so much I am not aware of. Especially because it isn’t my line of work. Not yet. Now probably I’ll be more aware of what is happening. To get the most out of this, because it is such a wonderful program, a trained professional will benefit from it. Even then, this would help me as a parent and definitely open children’s minds to new things. So it would help as even a game for the children. THE PROTOTYPE | USER TESTING
  • 99. 100 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONS The future of design education depends on how well institutions can adapt curricula to changing conditions in the field: to the increasing complexity of design problems that argue for tools and systems, not objects; to designing with rather than for people; to recognizing the importance of community and context; and to collaborating with peer experts in other fields. -Meredith Davis, Professor, North Carolina State University An excerpt from the article “An Introduction to Graphic Design” by William Drenttel & Jessica Helfand. END NOTE
  • 100. 101 endnoteEND NOTE
  • 101. 102 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONSEND NOTE Have schools become lazy? A thought that has been nagging me for a while now. I’ve been reading about Shibumi, a small school in Bangalore, ‘its deepest concern being to bring up children who are free, responsible and concerned with the whole of life.’ A close friend forwarded me a link about them making a radical shift in their curriculum, which they have shared on their blog (shibuminews.blogspot.com). It’s amazing. I might be creating a pedagogical tool for it but they have moved beyond it, making it a part of their on-going curriculum. Their intent is to help a child discover areas in which there may be the deep interest, aptitude and vulnerability for life to most fully express itself through the individual. They intend on focussing on hands-on, immersive experiences through apprenticeships as well as direct dialogue with the child. The curriculum aims to be more individualized than it is at present. “We foresee that such a curriculum will help foster a love of learning (because a student would be working at something that he or she cares about, rather than accepting the existing drudgery of the system), along with self-confidence and responsibility.” With the number of schools growing and the need for qualified teachers also on a rise, giving individual attention to a class of 35-40 I guess is too much to ask. But then, why are schools so lazy to give any new curriculum (much like this one) a chance. This might be just an idea but why wouldn’t a school want a child to explore the things he’s passionate about. Why are we so fearful of being rid of examinations? Parikrma calls it ‘exam-oriented’ from 8th grade onwards. Are schools not wiling to put in that extra effort because of fear of change? have scbecome
  • 102. 103 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONSEND NOTE Sir Ken Robinson once said, “the whole purpose of public education throughout the world is to produce university professors.” Why? Why not dancers, or football players, or Attakalri instructors? Why do these seem ludicrous, imaginative and unsustainable? Why do these have to remain as mere castles in the sky? choolse lazy?
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  • 104. 105 I would like to thank, Ms. Geetha Narayanan Srishti School of Art, Design & Technology Ms. Shukla Bose Ms. Ambika Parchure Bharati Ma’am The Parikrma staff Parikrma Humanity Centre Kanchan ‘Akka’ Mr. Vinay Goel My Review Panel, Geetanjali Sachdev Kalpana Mr. Sanjay Morlidhar Vinayaka Laser Engraving & Cutting Print Xpress Kolor Kode I would especially like to thanks the students of Class Saturn from Parikrma- Prathap, Meghashree, Gayatri, Chetan, Krupa, Kavitha, Chirnajeevi, Nagarjun, Karthik, Asha, Dhanush, Pramod, Rajeshwari & Varaprasad. Sonali Sanade Gauri, Mrinali, Kadambari And finally, My mother who played devil’s advocate & trusted my judgement; My friends who lent a hand, gave me their time & valuable feedback- Upasana Bijoor, Vishvan Saran, Alannah, Urmila, Nalisha, Sayantoni, Anushka, Neeti, Nikita, Rahul, and the rest who stood by my side patiently rooting for me. acknowledgments ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
  • 105. 106 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONSRESEARCH | READINGS- PAULO FREIRE Paulo Freire, A Brazilian educator and influential theorist of Critical Pedagogy embraced a nonorthodox form of Liberation Theology. His books, Education as the Practice of Freedom & Pedagogy of the Oppressed are most widely known. “There is no such thing as a neutral education process. Education either functions as an instrument which is used to facilitate the integration of generations into the logic of the present systems or bring about conformity to it, or it becomes the ‘practice of freedom’, the means by which men and women deal critically with reality and discover how to participate in their transformation of the world.” - Jane Thompson, Drawing on Paulo Freire He contributed the philosophy of education that came not only from the classical approaches stemming from Plato, but also from Marxist & Anti-colonialist thinkers. Pedagogy of the Oppressed emphasizes the need to provide native populations with an education which was new & modern (rather than traditional) & anti-colonialist (not simple an extension of the culture of the colonizer). He differentiates between the two positions- the oppressor & the oppressed. Education allows the oppressed to regain their humanity & overcome their condition. In order for this to take effect, the oppressed have to play a role in their own liberation. Oppressors must also be willing to rethink their way of life and examine their own role in the oppression if true liberation is to occur. Best known attack- The ‘Banking’ Concept- Students are viewed as an empty account to be filled by the teacher. “It transforms students into receiving objects.” Critical Pedagogy is the strong aversion to the teacher-student dichotomy. A teacher who learns & a learner who teaches- Basic rule of Classroom Participation. Educator and student are not on an equal footing but the educator must be humble enough to be disposed Notes from Paulo Freire
  • 106. 107 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONSRESEARCH | READINGS to relearn that which he/she already thinks she knows, through interaction with the learner. A mutual enquiry must be placed around dialogue in the teacher-student relationship. In the Traditional Model, a teacher transfers information by standing in the centre of the room while the student takes notes and is then tested. In the Dialogic Model, education is not a transfer of skills to a student. The teacher is not a mechanical delivery system or an answer giver. “Education must begin with the solution of the teacher-student contradiction by reconciling the poles of the contradiction so that both are simultaneously teacher & student.”
  • 107. 108 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONS Notes from Roger Hart Roger Hart, a sociologist, his work is broadly concerned with finding ways to foster greater participation of disadvantaged children- articulating their concerns, perspectives as a way of fulfilling their rights. His research always concerns children and their environment. He is highly collaborative with communities, enabling them to investigate their own communities in order to change them. Hart is also the Codirector of Children’s Environment Research Group (CERG). Convention on the Rights of Children (CRC) ”Children have the right to participate in all matters affecting their lives, according to their own capacity.” Hart wrote a book called Children’s Participation: The Theory And Practice Of Involving Young Citizens In Community Development And Environmental Care for UNICEF in 1997. The “Ladder of Children’s Participation,” also called the “Ladder of Youth Participation,” is one of many significant tools in context of a global movement for participation, each step representing degrees & different forms of participation between a child and an adult (diagram illustrated on the next page). RESEARCH | READINGS- ROGER HART
  • 108. 109 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONS Degrees of Participation 8) Young people-initiated, shared decisions with adults. This happens when projects or programs are initiated by young people and decision-making is shared between young people and adults. These projects empower young people while at the same time enabling them to access and learn from the life experience and expertise of adults. This rung of the ladder can be embodied by youth/adult partnerships. 7) Young people-initiated and directed. This step is when young people initiate and direct a project or program. Adults are involved only in a supportive role. This rung of the ladder can be embodied by youth-led activism. 6) Adult-initiated, shared decisions with young people. Occurs when projects or programs are initiated by adults but the decision-making is shared with the young people. This rung of the ladder can be embodied by participatory action research. 5) Consulted and informed. Happens when young people give advice on projects or programs designed and run by adults. The young people are informed about how their input will be used and the outcomes of the decisions made by adults. This rung of the ladder can be embodied by youth advisory councils. 4) Assigned but informed. This is where young people are assigned a specific role and informed about how and why they are being involved. This rung of the ladder can be embodied by community youth boards. 3) Tokenism. When young people appear to be given a voice, but in fact have little or no choice about what they do or how they participate. This rung of the ladder reflects adultism. 2) Decoration. Happens when young people are used to help or “bolster” a cause in a relatively indirect way, although adults do not pretend that the cause is inspired by young people. This rung of the ladder reflects adultism. 1) Manipulation. Happens where adults use young people to support causes and pretend that the causes are inspired by young people. This rung of the ladder reflects adultism. Sourced from freechild.org) RESEARCH | READINGS
  • 109. 110 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONS Notes from Geetanjali Sachdev’s Dissertation To understand the bank of knowledge of these kids and where it comes from, Geetanjali Sachdev (faculty and review panel member) suggested I read her Dissertation on the Epistemological Beliefs of Students in an Undergraduate Art & Design College. Epistemological Beliefs are beliefs one holds about the nature of knowledge & learning. These beliefs determine how new knowledge is perceived & processed and has significantly influences students learning & performance. There are many factors that influence students’ epistemological beliefs (Indian context)- • The educational system in Indian schools which are based on colonial & indigenous models of education. • Impacted by students homes and social environment influences by Hindu religious thought. Cultural contexts within which individuals are raised in, play a major role in impacting their epistemological beliefs & explain the differences in beliefs between an individual and a group. Hypothesized by Schommer (1990, 1993), there exists at least Five Dimensions to the Epistemological Belief System. They are- 1. Certainty of Knowledge ranging from ‘knowledge is absolute’ to ‘knowledge is tentative.’ 2. Structure of Knowledge ranging from ‘knowledge is organized as isolated bits and is best characterized in isolated facts’ to ‘knowledge is organized as highly interwoven concepts.’ 3. Source of Knowledge ranging from ‘knowledge is handed down by authority’ to ‘knowledge is derived through reason.’ 4. Control of Knowledge Acquisition ranging from ‘the ability to learn is fixed at birth’ to ’ the ability to learn can be changed.’ RESEARCH | READINGS- DISSERTATION
  • 110. 111 INCONGRUOUS IDEAS, LUDICROUS COMBINATIONS 5. Speed of Knowledge Acquisition ranging from ‘knowledge is acquired quickly or not at all’ to ‘knowledge is acquired gradually.’ There are two types of learners who seek entry into higher education in India- the first who want a degree for the symbolic validation that it provides or the general skill that they offer, the second want to acquire skills & competence required by the job market. There are a large number of students from the lower socio-economic strata coming from rural and government schools that comprise of 30%-40% of enrolments in higher education. Lewis claims that there are 6 ways that individuals believe or know: believing in an authority, deductive logic, the experience of the senses, the emotion or feeling that something is true or right, rational intuition & personal use of the scientific method. RESEARCH | DISSERTATION
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