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Brazil Scientific Mobility Program guide 2013/2014
 

Brazil Scientific Mobility Program guide 2013/2014

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Brazil Scientific Mobility Program guide 2013/2014.

Brazil Scientific Mobility Program guide 2013/2014.
Sponsored by CAPES and CNPq.

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    Brazil Scientific Mobility Program guide 2013/2014 Brazil Scientific Mobility Program guide 2013/2014 Document Transcript

    • 2013-2014 Student Handbook Brazil Scientific Mobility Program SponsoredbyCAPES&CNPq BRAZIL SCIENTIFIC MOBILITY PROGRAM
    • ©2013 Institute of International Education—Brazil Scientific Mobility Program Cover Photo courtesy of the U.S. Consulate General Rio de Janeiro
    • Introduction..................................................................................................................................................... 7 BSMP Email Contact Information & Staff ............................................................................................. 8 BSMP Email Contacts............................................................................................................................... 9 BSMP Intensive English Email Contacts ................................................................................................ 10 BSMP Staff.............................................................................................................................................. 12 BSMP Intensive English Staff.................................................................................................................. 13 Forms ............................................................................................................................................................... 14 BSMP Forms ........................................................................................................................................... 15 BSMP Intensive English Forms .............................................................................................................. 15 Program Overview.................................................................................................................................... 16 Understanding Your Terms of Appointment and Special Instructions................................................... 17 J-1 Visa Sponsorship and Requirements ................................................................................................ 17 Program Duration .................................................................................................................................. 17 Two Year Home Residency Requirement ............................................................................................... 17 Family..................................................................................................................................................... 17 International Travel................................................................................................................................ 18 Revision and Termination of Scholarship............................................................................................... 18 Preparing for Departure and Initial Arrival in the U.S. ............................................................... 19 Your J-1 Visa and Entering the U.S......................................................................................................... 20 SEVIS & U.S. Visit.................................................................................................................................... 21 Immunization Requirements.................................................................................................................. 21 Baggage ................................................................................................................................................. 22 Pre-departure Checklist.......................................................................................................................... 22 What to Bring......................................................................................................................................... 23 Initial Arrival at Your Academic Institution............................................................................................ 23 Initial Arrival Checklist............................................................................................................................ 24 During Your Exchange Program........................................................................................................... 25 General Advice & Assistance.................................................................................................................. 26 Academic Reporting to IIE...................................................................................................................... 26 Full-time Status and Academic Standing ............................................................................................... 26 International Travel................................................................................................................................ 26 Table of Contents
    • Table of Contents Final Departure from the United States............................................................................................. 28 Obtaining a Return Ticket ...................................................................................................................... 29 Final Reporting....................................................................................................................................... 29 Wrapping Up.......................................................................................................................................... 29 Grace Period........................................................................................................................................... 29 Emergency Departure or Withdrawal.................................................................................................... 30 Scholarship Overview............................................................................................................................... 31 Stipends & Allowances ........................................................................................................................... 32 Room and Board, Academic Tuition, and Fees....................................................................................... 32 Housing .................................................................................................................................................. 32 Meals...................................................................................................................................................... 33 Billing...................................................................................................................................................... 34 Receiving Scholarship Funds & Banking in the U.S........................................................................ 35 Banking in the U.S. ................................................................................................................................. 36 Stipends and Electronic Fund Transfers (EFTs)....................................................................................... 36 Personal Funds and Wire Transfers........................................................................................................ 37 Credit Cards............................................................................................................................................ 37 Health Insurance & Staying Healthy ................................................................................................... 39 Health Insurance Requirements............................................................................................................. 40 Understanding Your Health Insurance Policy......................................................................................... 41 The U.S. Healthcare System ................................................................................................................... 41 Staying Healthy ...................................................................................................................................... 42 Academic Training (AT) ............................................................................................................................. 44 J-1 Requirements & Eligibility................................................................................................................. 45 Student Employment.............................................................................................................................. 45 Social Security Number (SSN) and Individual Taxpayer Identification Number (ITIN) ........................... 46 Taxes ...................................................................................................................................................... 46 United States Society, Culture, & Government ................................................................................ 48 Characteristics of Americans.................................................................................................................. 49 Cultural Diversity in the U.S.................................................................................................................... 50 The Law & Civil Rights............................................................................................................................ 50
    • Table of Contents Electoral College .....................................................................................................................................51 Higher Education in the United States.................................................................................................53 Academic Year ........................................................................................................................................54 Undergraduate Courses..........................................................................................................................54 Graduate Courses ...................................................................................................................................54 Methods of Teaching ..............................................................................................................................54 Grading Systems .....................................................................................................................................55 Appendix One—Holidays.........................................................................................................................56 Official Holidays ......................................................................................................................................57 Cultural Holidays.....................................................................................................................................58 Other Holidays ........................................................................................................................................59 Appendix Two—Weights & Measures .................................................................................................60 Metric Conversions .................................................................................................................................61 Temperature Conversions.......................................................................................................................61 Clothing Size Conversions .......................................................................................................................62 Appendix Three—Money..........................................................................................................................63 Sales Tax .................................................................................................................................................64 U.S. Currency...........................................................................................................................................64 Appendix Four—Communication...........................................................................................................66 Telephones..............................................................................................................................................67 The Media (Newspapers, Radio, Television)...........................................................................................69 Appendix Five—Transportation .............................................................................................................70 Local Public Transportation ....................................................................................................................71 Automobiles............................................................................................................................................71 Long-Distance Travel ..............................................................................................................................72 Appendix Six—Miscellaneous ................................................................................................................73 Time Zones..............................................................................................................................................74 Hours of Business....................................................................................................................................74 Electricity.................................................................................................................................................74 Climate....................................................................................................................................................75
    • Religion .................................................................................................................................................. 76 Leisure.................................................................................................................................................... 76 Safety ..................................................................................................................................................... 76 Map of the U.S. ...................................................................................................................................... 77 Appendix Seven—Glossary.................................................................................................................... 78 Appendix Eight—Brazilian Consulate Information........................................................................ 84 Table of Contents
    • 7 Introduction Congratulations on your selection as a Brazil Scientific Mobility Program (BSMP) scholarship recipient. It is IIE’s distinct pleasure to welcome you to the United States and assist you throughout your program. You will not only have the opportunity to immerse yourself in the world of U.S. academia, but also to experience American higher education first- hand by attending one of the most rigorous institutions in the United States. IIE hopes that you will use this time to create, share, and apply knowledge with people from different walks of life. May your time here be challenging, enriching, and life-changing. The Institute of International Education (IIE), a private nonprofit organization founded in 1919, is dedicated to the promotion of international exchange for educational purposes. IIE develops and administers over 2,050 other programs which involve students, teachers, leaders and specialists from approximately 140 countries around the world. IIE works with international organizations, governments, agencies, foundations, private organizations, and colleges and universities in the United States, as well as abroad. It also serves as a clearinghouse of information on all aspects of international education. IIE has been contracted by your sponsors, the Government of Brazil - Ministry of Education, Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior (CAPES) and the National Council of Scientific and Technological Development, Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Cientifico e Tecnologico (CNPq) to assist and maintain contact with you and your host institution, in particular your International Student Advisor, for the duration of your stay in the United States. As a contracted administrator of BSMP, and your visa sponsor, IIE is required to request various reports, surveys, transcripts and other related information from you throughout your program. It is essential that you submit this information in a timely manner as it will need to be shared with CAPES and CNPq, as well as the United States Department of State, and the Department of Homeland Security through the Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS).
    • BSMP Email Contact Information & Staff
    • 9 Category Reason for Contact Email Address Application Materials Spring candidates should submit all required application materials (passport, score reports, letter of recommendations, transcripts, etc.) here. BSWBapp_Spring@iie.org Fall candidates should submit all required application materials (passport, score reports, letter of recommendations, transcripts, etc.) here. BSWBapp_Fall@iie.org General Inquiries For all inquiries related to the spring cohort of the program. If you are a member of the spring cohort, you should direct any general inquiries here. BSWB_Spring@iie.org For all inquiries related to the fall cohort of the program. If you are a member of the fall cohort, you should direct any general inquiries here. BSWB_Fall@iie.org Immigration For all immigration documentation including Form DS-2019, I-94, arrival and address forms, travel requests and other visa related inquiries. BSWBimmigration@iie.org Academic Reports For initial, mid-year, and final academic reports. BSWBreports@iie.org Financial Inquiries For all bills and invoices from host institution; inquiries regarding stipends, meals, and housing. BSWBpayment@iie.org Health Care and Insurance For all health related inquiries, including payment. BSWBinsurance@iie.org Academic Training For all employment-, internship-, and research- related inquiries. BrazilAT@iie.org BSMP Email Contacts
    • 10 BSMP Intensive English Email Contacts Group Category Reason for Contact Email Address Summer Intensive English General Inquiries For all inquiries related to the summer Intensive English Program. While you are enrolled in this program, you should direct any general inquiries here. brazilpreac@iie.org Academic Reports For initial, mid-year, and final Intensive English reports. Brazilpreac@iie.org Immigration For all immigration documentation including Form DS-2019, I-94, arrival and address forms, travel requests and other visa related inquiries. Brazilpreac@iie.org Long-Term Intensive English General Inquiries For all inquiries related to the spring cohort of the Long-term English program. If you are a member of the spring cohort, you should direct any general inquiries here. BrazilLTEspring@iie.org For all inquiries related to the fall cohort of the Long-term English program. If you are a member of the fall cohort, you should direct any general inquiries here. BrazilLTEfall@iie.org Academic Reports For initial, mid-year, and final academic reports related to the spring cohort. BrazilLTEspring@iie.org For initial, mid-year, and final academic reports related to the fall cohort. BrazilLTEfall@iie.org Immigration For all immigration documentation including Form DS-2019, I-94, arrival and address forms, travel requests and other visa related inquiries related to the spring cohort. BrazilLTEspring@iie.org For all immigration documentation including Form DS-2019, I-94, arrival and address forms, travel requests and other visa related inquiries related to the fall cohort. BrazilLTEfall@iie.org Continued on next page.
    • 11 BSMP Intensive English Email Contacts Both Financial Inquiries For all bills and invoices from host institution; inquiries regarding stipends, meals, and housing. This address is for while you are in the Intensive English Program only. BrazilEnglishpayment@iie.org Health Care and Insurance For all health related inquiries, including payment. bswbinsurance@iie.org Application Materials Spring candidates should submit all required application materials (passport, score reports, letter of recommendations, transcripts, etc.) here. BSWBapp_Spring@iie.org Fall candidates should submit all required application materials (passport, score reports, letter of recommendations, transcripts, etc.) here. BSWBapp_Fall@iie.org
    • 12 BSMP Staff Program Operations University Placement & Sponsor Relations Shahreen Rahman Senior Program Officer Nikesha Walters Program Officer II Fred Sanchez Program Officer Nick Savot Program Officer Gabriella Turrisi Program Officer Christopher Fenner Program Administrator Elizabeth Keane Program Administrator Esther Sosa Program Administrator Hadija Wilson Program Officer II Laura Ormsby Program Officer Mahbubur Rahman Reporting Manager Gloria Bennett Senior Program Administrator Hamzeh Almadani Program Administrator Olivia Arguinzoni Program Administrator Rozaan Daniel Program Administrator Khadija Moorehead Program Administrator Academic Training Laura Giles Program Officer II Julia Sattler Senior Program Coordinator Edward Monks Director of Academic and Experiential Learning Rebecca Carpenter de Cortina Assistant Director of Academic and Experiential Learning Elizabeth Stark Senior Manager of Finance & Administration
    • 13 Drew Propson Senior Program Officer Sidney Jones Program Officer Mie Hansen Program Administrator Kristen Van Vleck Program Administrator BSMP Intensive English Staff Carl DeAngelis Director of English and Pre-academic Programs
    • Forms
    • 15 Forms Here you will find a list of forms that will be required of you during your year in the U.S. There may be additional forms requested of you via email that are not on this list. BSMP FORMS The forms listed below all pertain to the regular academic year. For Intensive English Program information regarding forms, please see the section below called “BSMP Intensive English Forms.” Program Forms The forms below can all be found at the following link on the IIE website: http://www.iie.org/Programs/Brazil- Scientific-Mobility/Current-Students/Materials. Noted next to them are the email addresses to which the completed forms should be sent. Initial Travel Itinerary Form—BSWB_Spring@iie.org or BSWB_Fall@iie.org Health Insurance Confirmation Form—BSWBinsurance@iie.org Report of Arrival Form—BSWB_Spring@iie.org or BSWB_Fall@iie.org Change of Address Form—BSWBimmigration@iie.org Student Report Initial—BSWBreports@iie.org BSMP Funds Deposit Authorization Agreement Form—BSWBpayment@iie.org Blank W-9 Form—BSWBpayment@iie.org Student Report Mid-Program—BSWBreports@iie.org Travel Validation Form—BSWBimmigration@iie.org Final Departure Report Form—BSWBImmigration@iie.org Academic Training Forms Please visit the following link on the IIE website for all Academic Training forms: http://www.iie.org/Programs/ Brazil-Scientific-Mobility/Current-Students/Academic-Training. (Click on the “Forms” tab.) Academic Training forms should be sent to BrazilAT@iie.org, unless otherwise noted. BSMP INTENSIVE ENGLISH FORMS The forms on the website cited below all pertain to the Intensive English Program, both long-term, and summer. Please visit the following link on the IIE website for all Intensive English Program forms: http://www.iie.org/ Programs/Brazil-Scientific-Mobility/Current-Students/Intensive%20English. (Click on the “Forms” tab.) Intensive English forms should be sent to the appropriate contact. Please see the “BSMP Intensive English Email Contact” list on pages 10-11.
    • Program Overview
    • 17 Program Overview As you have received your academic placement, and you are now ready to embark on this new journey, you are probably faced with many questions. To provide more insight into what will be expected of you, and what you should expect from the program, below you will find a general overview of program policies, immigration regulations, and scholarship benefits. It is imperative that you fully understand this information. Please note that any of these policies or benefits are subject to change, and that if such a change should occur, you will be notified. UNDERSTANDING YOUR TERMS OF APPOINTMENT AND SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS Your Terms of Appointment and Special Instructions (TOA) describe the benefits and conditions of your BSMP scholarship. You must read and fully understand this legally binding document in its entirety. IIE recommends that you bring a copy with you so you can reference it throughout your authorized program. If you have any questions regarding your TOA, please contact IIE by sending an email. J-1 VISA SPONSORSHIP AND REQUIREMENTS Your non-immigrant visa status will be that of a J-1 Exchange Visitor, non-degree student category. Your visa sponsorship will be provided under IIE’s Exchange Visitor Program P-3-00006. IIE will act as your exchange visitor visa sponsor and will provide you with its respective services, which includes issuing you a Form DS-2019 and providing you with instructions for securing a J-1 exchange visitor visa. IIE will continue to assist you in maintaining your non- immigration status and complying with J-1 visa regulations throughout your authorized program. You, in turn, are responsible for maintaining your status as a full-time student in good standing, and completing and submitting various reports, forms, transcripts, surveys, and other information as instructed by IIE throughout your authorized program. It is also your responsibility to ensure that you are fulfilling all the requirements your host institution(s) has for non- degree students. You are required to comply with all the academic and professional standards of your host institution (s). PROGRAM DURATION Your program lasts for the period of time specified in your TOA. You are required to complete the full period of the program, and to obtain approval from CAPES or CNPq, and IIE for further stay beyond this period. Should an emergency necessitate early departure, prior approval must be obtained from CAPES/CNPq, and IIE. This scholarship is non- renewable, and your visa sponsorship will not be transferred to any institution upon completion of your program. This scholarship is also subject to the penalties of your host institution(s) for any violation of its academic policies. TWO YEAR HOME RESIDENCY REQUIREMENT BSMP is designed for individuals who are committed to completing all components of the exchange program, including the two-year home residency requirement. IIE staff cannot provide any support or information regarding visa lottery applications, green cards or any procedures for immigration. Any individual interested in pursuing these opportunities prior to completing the two-year home residency requirement should consider withdrawal from the program. Please note that: if an individual has applied for a diversity visa lottery and does not “win,” then he/she may not be eligible for future visa categories. Additionally, visa sponsorship will not be negated; the two-year home residency requirement will still apply. Any questions regarding immigration must be directed to an immigration attorney. FAMILY BSMP scholarships are for recipients only. BSMP program policy does not support dependents or family members, and IIE will not be able to provide J-2 visa sponsorship. Accordingly, you may not bring nor have any dependents or family accompany you for any time during your program. Family and friends may visit you during holidays or designated host institution breaks, but they must come on tourist visas obtained independently. IIE is unable to provide assistance to you or your family in securing tourist visas. In addition to the above, you should not plan on sending any portion of your
    • 18 Program Overview scholarship funds to support your family back home. Costs are high in the U.S. and your scholarship will only cover your own expenses. INTERNATIONAL TRAVEL It is CAPES and CNPq program policy that BSMP students remain in the U.S. for their entire scholarship period. Should you choose to travel outside the U.S. during your program, you will be willfully breaking program policy and you will be fully responsible for any consequences that are a result thereof. Neither CAPES/CNPq, nor IIE are responsible for any expenses accrued by, or actions of those students who do not comply with this policy. Should circumstances arise that require you to travel outside the U.S., you must consult with IIE and CAPES or CNPq directly. International travel requires that you have your Form DS-2019 signed to authorize travel. Although you are not allowed to travel internationally during your scholarship period, you are permitted to travel within the U.S. If you plan to travel within the U.S., you are not required to notify IIE or have your Form DS-2019 signed. Any national travel within the United States must not conflict with your coursework, academic training or other program duties. You should not request your host institution to alter scheduled classes or exams for recreational activities. REVISION AND TERMINATION OF SCHOLARSHIP IIE, in cooperation with CAPES/CNPq, reserves the right to revise, adjust, revoke or terminate your scholarship provisions should conditions so require or noncompliance with the provisions of the scholarship warrant such action. Conditions for revision may include, but are not limited to, late arrival, extended travel outside of the U.S., and changes in financial resources available to you in the U.S. A U.S. host institution and IIE may recommend revocation of a scholarship to CAPES/CNPq. Grounds for revocation or termination include, but are not limited to: (1) violation of any law of the U.S.; (2) any act of misconduct likely to give offence; (3) failure to observe satisfactory academic or professional standards; (4) physical or mental incapacitation; (5) engaging in unauthorized income-producing activity; (6) material misrepresentation made by any scholarship recipient in the application form or scholarship document; (7) failure to provide all required documents to the administering agency prior to arrival in the U.S.; and (8) failure to comply with the Terms of Appointment of the BSMP scholarship. BSMP scholarship may be suspended if: (1) the scholarship recipient ceases to carry out the project or academic program during the scholarship period; (2) the scholarship recipient leaves the host country without authorization of CAPES/CNPq, IIE or his/her U.S. host institution; (3) conditions in the host country require the departure of scholarship recipient for reasons of personal safety or security; and (4) the host institution ends the program for any reason. It is important that you reach out to your Brazilian Consular Representative in the U.S. as soon as you believe there could be an issue to discuss ways to address your situation. Please see Appendix 8 for a full list of Brazilian consulates in the U.S.. If you are involved in a serious issue that endangers your U.S. host institution’s population or reputation, your scholarship can be terminated immediately. Before you leave Brazil, be sure all details concerning your J-1 visa and travel have been finalized. For your trip, carry with you the names, addresses and telephone numbers of your International Student Advisor or other important contacts at your U.S. host institution. Carry this information separate from your passport, Form DS-2019, and TOA. Be sure to have these items easily accessible because the United States Customs and Border Patrol (USCBP) will ask you for them at your port of entry into the United States. Do not pack your passport, Form DS-2019, or TOA in your checked luggage.
    • Preparing for Departure and Initial Arrival in the U.S.
    • 20 YOUR J-1 VISA AND ENTERING THE U.S. As the recipient of this scholarship, you are required to apply for a J-1 Exchange Visitor visa under the sponsorship of IIE (Exchange Visitor Program Number P-3-00006). You will need your Form DS-2019, which will be issued by IIE, to apply for a J-1 visa at the U.S. Embassy or Consulate nearest to you in Brazil. You should apply for your J-1 visa immediately upon receipt of your Form DS-2019. Under no circumstances should you apply for an F-1 (student) visa, a B-1/B-2 tourist visa, an immigrant visa, or any other type of visa. If your U.S. host institution issues you a Form DS-2019 or a Form I-20 (for an F-1visa), then you must inform them that IIE has issued you a Form DS-2019 and immediately return the documents they issued you. Your passport should be valid for at least six (6) months beyond the expiration date of your Form DS-2019 at all times. Along with your passport and Form DS-2019, the U.S. Embassy or Consulate may ask you to present your TOA as well as any information about your medical history (e.g., x-ray photograph of your chest, certification of good health, and proof of vaccination against small-pox or measles within the last three years). Preparing for Departure and Initial Arrival in the U.S. Upon arrival at your Port of Entry in the United States the USCBP officer will review your passport, J-1 visa and Form DS -2019. The USCBP officer will then process your electronic Form I-94 Arrival/Departure Record and stamp a “Port of Entry Admission Stamp” in your passport. It is important to make sure this stamp reflects the date you entered the U.S., your class of admission (J-1) and your duration of stay (D/S). Your passport, J-1 visa and Form DS-2019 will be returned to you. The USCBP officer should also provide you with written instructions on how to access your automated Form I-94 online. As of June 2013 international visitors arriving by air or sea who are admitted under a non-immigrant visa status to the United States will no longer be issued a paper version of Form I-94 Arrival/Departure Record, unless there is a very specific circumstance. Form I-94 Arrival/Departure Records will be created electronically and maintained in USCBP systems. This means that upon your leaving the U.S. the USCBP will automatically record your departure using manifest information obtained from your airline/sea carrier. It is important to note, however, that if you leave and re-enter the U.S. during your authorized program your previous Form I-94 Arrival-Departure Record will be overwritten and a new automated record will be created. Should your J-1 visa expire and you wish to visit Mexico, Canada, or the contiguous islands during your program, you must make sure USCBP verifies your Form I-94 electronically in order to ensure that you meet the conditions of automatic revalidation. For more information about automatic revalidation please visit http://www.cbp.gov/ linkhandler/cgov/travel/id_visa/revalidation.ctt/revalidation.pdf.
    • 21 Sample of electronic Form I-94 Arrival/Departure Record Important Note: Please be aware that U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s (DHS) regulations state that holders of J -1 non-immigrant visas will only be admitted to the United States thirty (30) days or less prior to the Start Date on the Form DS-2019. Please consider this date carefully when making your travel plans to the United States. SEVIS & U.S. VISIT The U.S. Department of State (DOS) manages the Exchange Visitor Program for non-immigrant exchange visitors in the J-1 visa classification and their dependents. DOS uses the DHS Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS), an internet-based system, to maintain information on immigration and academic status of Exchange Visitor (e.g., students, teachers, trainees, professors, scholars and respective dependents). In particular, SEVIS tracks arrivals and departures as well as continued enrollment, academic training, on campus employment and other important related activities. The U.S. VISIT is part of a continuum of biometrically enhanced security measures that begins outside U.S. borders and continues through a visitor’s arrival in and departure from the U.S.. It incorporates eligibility determinations made by the DHS and DOS at the U.S. Embassy or Consulate abroad. U.S. VISIT currently applies to all visitors (with limited exemptions) entering the United States regardless of country of origin, whether they are traveling on a visa or arriving by air, sea, or land. Most visitors experience U.S. VISIT’s biometric procedures - digital, inkless finger scans and digital photograph - upon entry to the United States. IMMUNIZATION REQUIREMENTS Most U.S. host institutions require students to provide proof of immunizations before registering for classes for the first time. In addition, students are also typically asked to complete a medical form which may include emergency contact information, health history, a physical exam, and immunizations. Proof of the following immunizations is required:  MMR – measles, mumps, rubella (2 doses after the age of 12 months which must be at least 30 days apart)  TD/DT – tetanus and diphtheria (within the last 10 years)  TB – skin test for tuberculosis (within 6 months of arrival, and sometimes required again upon arrival) Prior to your arrival you should contact your International Student Advisor regarding the immunization requirements of your host institution and whether some vaccinations can be administered in Brazil. Please remember to bring proof (official documentation issued by your doctor or hospital) of your immunizations. Preparing for Departure and Initial Arrival in the U.S.
    • 22 Preparing for Departure and Initial Arrival in the U.S. BAGGAGE It is recommended that you arrange to have any additional baggage sent to you directly once you have found permanent housing in the U.S. Do not send baggage to IIE’s offices as there. are no facilities for storing baggage, and IIE will not take responsibility for it. Please note that IIE is not authorized by CAPES/CNPq to issue reimbursement or any funding to BSMP students for overweight or lost baggage. PRE-DEPARTURE CHECKLIST Before you leave, make sure you go through the following checklist. It will help you organize yourself for your departure from Brazil and initial arrival in the U.S.  Obtain or update your passport so it is valid for at least 6 (six) months beyond the duration of your Form DS-2019.  Obtain your original Form DS-2019 from IIE.  Apply for a J-1 exchange visitor entry visa.  Attend your interview for a J-1 exchange visitor visa at the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate..  Obtain international airline tickets, with final U.S. destination as noted in your TOA. When doing so find out if there are any baggage specifications or security clearances for your particular airline.  Inform IIE and your International Student Advisor at your U.S. host institution of your complete itinerary including airlines, flight numbers, transfer cities, and dates and times of flights. You may use the Mandatory Travel Form. This should be done at least 2 (two) weeks prior to your departure.  Arrange transportation from the airport to your U.S. host institution.  Review your host institution’s health insurance plan and health center information.  Have any necessary medical and dental work done in Brazil prior to your departure.  Obtain necessary immunization requirements of your U.S. host institution. Please contact your International Student Advisor or host institution’s health center if you have further questions.  Contact your International Student Advisor and/or housing office to find out what your housing and meal accommodations will be, and how to apply/make arrangements accordingly.  Do not pay housing application fees or deposits with personal funds as you will not be reimbursed. Request that all housing application fees and deposit invoice be sent to IIE directly.  Inquire about any orientation programs that have been planned for international students by your host institution.  Purchase traveler’s checks and bring a small amount of U.S. currency with you.  Give your family a copy of your TOA.
    • 23 WHAT TO BRING Below is a list of items that you may not readily think about bringing, but will be very glad you did:  An official up-to-date transcript of your studies in Brazil (along with official English translation).  Your current driver’s license or international driver’s license.  Your birth certificate.  Your medical records, especially if you have any pre-existing health condition.  A year supply of medication(s) for any pre-existing health conditions. Prescriptions from abroad cannot be filled in the United States. It is also a good idea to have your current doctor provide you with a description of the prescription medicine (s) you take. You can then use this information to consult with a U.S. doctor for a prescription that can be filled in the United States.  Your dental records.  An extra pair of eyeglasses or supply of contact lenses.  Your Social Security Number (SSN) or Individual Taxpayer Identification Number (ITIN) if you were previously issued one.  A credit card with lesser fees for international transactions; international students may face a long wait applying for credit cards in the United States.  Slides, photographs, maps, books, traditional clothing, or other cultural artifacts/objects of your home country which can be used in informal talks that you may be invited to give. Important Note: It is probably wise to omit most household items such as linens and cooking utensils because they can be purchased in the U.S. at a reasonable cost. INITIAL ARRIVAL AT YOUR ACADEMIC INSTITUTION BMSP students must arrive to their U.S. host institutions as per the Program Start/Arrival Date as stated in their TOA. You should NOT arrive before this date as housing or meal accommodations may not be available. You should follow the instructions you have received from your host institution and IIE. If you are instructed to arrive at your host institution before the official start of classes, generally for international student orientation purposes, please contact your International Student Advisor to make sure housing is available; they may need to help you arrange temporary housing while you wait for your permanent housing to be ready. If you do not have a permanent residence by the 10th (tenth) day from the Start Date of your Form DS-2019, you should notify IIE immediately. In addition, as per your TOA, you are also responsible for informing the appropriate offices (Housing Office, Bursar’s, etc.) at your host institution to invoice IIE directly. IIE will make payments for approved BSMP scholarship benefits (tuition, academic fees, housing, meal plan, insurance premium, etc.) on your behalf. You should also provide your residence address to these offices. Upon arrival you must contact IIE to report your arrival and provide your physical residence address (the address where you are living) and other contact information. J-1 visa regulations require this information be reported SEVIS. If you fail to report this information to IIE within ten (10) days from the Start Date on your Form DS-2019, your legal status in the United States will be in jeopardy. Failure to report your arrival as instructed can be grounds for termination. It is also a requirement of J-1 visa regulations and your BMSP scholarship that you keep IIE informed of your residential Preparing for Departure and Initial Arrival in the U.S.
    • 24 Preparing for Departure and Initial Arrival in the U.S. address (the address where you are living), including telephone number and e-mail, at all times and through your entire program. You must notify IIE of any changes within ten (10) days of making any changes to your address. To do this you can complete and submit Change of Address Form found at: http://www.iie.org/Programs/Brazil-Scientific- Mobility/Current-Students/Materials. You should note that mail sent to IIE will not be forwarded to you. INITIAL ARRIVAL CHECKLIST The checklist below will help you prioritize some things that need to be taken care of immediately upon your arrival at your host institution. This should all be done within 10 (ten) days of your arrival.  Upon entering the United States, you must notify IIE of your arrival and your residential address within ten (10) days of the Start Date on your Form DS-2019. Please complete the Report of Arrival Form.  Visit your International Student and Scholar Office to check in with your International Student Advisor and provide copies of your immigration documents (stamped DS-2019, visa, printed copy of your I-94 card from here). These copies should also be shared with IIE.  Update your host institution with your correct e-mail address/phone number/mailing address.  Locate permanent housing and meal accommodations that comply with BSMP policies (see Scholarship Overview for details).  Visit the health center/office on your campus to learn about your host institution’s health insurance plan and find out when they are open as well as what you need to do in the event that you should need medical care.  Complete and submit your Health Insurance Confirmation Form.  Review BSMP Finance FAQs: http://www.iie.org/Programs/Brazil-Scientific-Mobility/Current-Students/ Finance  Open a bank account (see Banking for more details).  Identify a doctor, and a hospital in the area that accepts your health insurance coverage.  Identify a dentist in the event that you should need dental care.  Complete and submit the BSMP Funds Deposit Authorization Agreement Form.  Notify the Billing/Bursar’s Office at your host institution of your scholarship. Be sure to tell them your BSMP scholarship is a “foreign-source income”. Provide them with a copy of your TOA, which has IIE’s billing contact information.  Email your Academic Student Advisor to introduce yourself and request to schedule a time to meet so you can discuss course registration and any other questions you may have regarding coursework, or your host institution’s academic policies.
    • During Your Exchange Program
    • 26 During Your Exchange Program It is important that you maintain contact with IIE even after you have reported your initial arrival, and have settled in to your new home. GENERAL ADVICE & ASSISTANCE During your stay in the U.S., your host institution, your designated Brazilian consulate, CAPES/CNPq and IIE will assist you as necessary. Throughout the year, IIE will send you general instructions, newsletters and announcements to inform you of reporting requirements and special forms. All of the information IIE requests is extremely important and integral for your successful completion of BSMP, so please adhere to all deadlines and proactively ask any questions that may surface. For information and advice about academic program matters, consult your International Student Advisor or your Academic Student Advisor. For information and advice about Intensive English Program matters, please contact your IEP advisor. If you have questions regarding housing, meals, campus facilities, etc., you should contact the appropriate offices at your U.S. host institution. If the on-campus resource is unable to assist you, your next resource for technical campus matters is IIE; for personal matters it is the Brazilian Consulate responsible for your region. Please see Appendix 8 for a full list of Brazilian Consulates near your area. ACADEMIC REPORTING TO IIE During your exchange program it is a requirement of J-1 visa regulations and your BSMP scholarship that you submit mandatory student forms, reports, transcripts and surveys to IIE throughout your program. Some of these documents will need to be completed by both you and your host institution advisors. You will receive newsletters and periodic email reminders regarding which forms to complete and their respective deadlines. All reports and forms must be submitted to IIE within the stated timeframe. In order to be in compliance with program policy and J-1 regulations you will be required to complete academic reports throughout your authorized program and send them to the appropriate contacts. FULL-TIME STATUS AND ACADEMIC STANDING As mentioned above you must be registered as a full-time student during your entire authorized program. The terms of your BSMP scholarship cover a full-time course load. Depending on the host institution, this generally ranges between 12 and 18 credits. Most undergraduates in the U.S. enroll in 12 to 15 credits. When registering for classes, it is your responsibility to check with your academic advisor and/or international student advisor to ensure that the course-load you are enrolled in (i) is appropriate for your aptitude; (ii) consists of at least 75% of credits directly related to your field of study as outlined above; and (iii) meets all institutional requirements and any other minimum academic requirements set forth by your host institution. It is not recommended that you enroll in any graduate-level coursework as these classes are very rigorous as well as laborious. Should you withdraw from a course, it is your responsibility to ensure you continue to maintain full-time status. If you do not maintain full-time status, you are effectively ending your BSMP Scholarship, and will be required to return to Brazil immediately. You must inform IIE immediately if you have any difficulty meeting these requirements or have any questions regarding your course load at any point during your program. INTERNATIONAL TRAVEL As mentioned above, it is CAPES and CNPq program policy that BSMP students remain in the U.S. for their entire scholarship period. Should you choose to travel outside the U.S. during your program you will be willfully breaking this
    • 27 During Your Exchange Program program policy and will be fully responsible for any consequences that are a result thereof. Should circumstances arise that require you to travel outside the U.S., you should review your passport and J-1 entry visa before you depart, and answer the following questions:  Is your passport valid for at least six months beyond the expiration of your Form DS-2019?  Has your Form DS-2019 been validated for travel and reentry once during the past 12 months?  Is your U.S. visa entry stamp valid for the date you will re-enter the United States?  Do you need to apply for a new visa because your previous visa was a single-entry visa which you used the last time you entered?  Does the country you intend to visit require a visa for entry? Contact the embassy/consulate of that country for further information. If you answered “no” to any of the first three questions, contact IIE immediately. If your passport needs to be renewed, it can be renewed by the Brazilian Embassy or Consulates in the U.S. Visas may be renewed only at a U.S. Embassy or Consulate in Brazil. You would need to return to Brazil and renew your J-1 visa. IIE cannot renew J-1 visas. Please see Appendix 8 for a full list of Brazilian consulates in the U.S. At the end of your exchange program you will have several options for departure from the United States. You must understand the information that is provided below, and contact IIE f you have any questions. Failure to follow instructions for departure may jeopardize your successful completion of the program and immigration status in the U.S. as well as reentry at a later date.
    • Final Departure From the U.S.
    • 29 Final Departure from the U.S. OBTAINING A RETURN TICKET You should plan your return early, giving yourself sufficient time to make the appropriate arrangements and purchase your airline tickets. Last minute arrangements can be very expensive and difficult, especially during the months of June- August when international travel is particularly heavy. If you have any questions regarding funding or arranging travel you will need to contact your representative at CAPES/CNPq. FINAL REPORTING You must inform IIE of your return travel plans to Brazil at least thirty (30) days prior to the End Date on your Form DS- 2019 by submitting Final Report Departure Form. On this form, you must provide the name of the airline/transit company and flight/train/bus numbers, the date of departure, the U.S. city of departure, the date of arrival and the city of arrival in Brazil. If you submit this report and your departure date changes from the date you list on the form, then you must let IIE know immediately. If you fail to submit this form or let IIE know of a change in this form, IIE will be required to withdraw visa sponsorship immediately and notify DHS and immigration authorities. Once this step has been taken, your status in the United States is illegal. IIE will send you a Final Program Evaluation Survey which you should complete before you leave the U.S. Your comments on the Final Program Evaluation Survey are very important for continual program development and improvement. Please note that this information may be shared with CAPES/CNPq. WRAPPING UP Before your departure, please make sure to complete the following:  Final Report Departure Form  Notify your host institution’s Registrar, Bursar and Housing offices that you are departing.  Request an official transcript (graduate report) to be sent to IIE.  Request any additional official transcripts be sent to your home in Brazil or, if necessary, to any respective Brazil Consulate.  Ensure all pending bills or credit cards have been paid in full.  Close all bank account(s).  Update your mailing address. GRACE PERIOD Following the completion of a J-1 exchange visitor’s program, the USCIS allows exchange visitors 30 (thirty) days to settle their affairs, travel and visit friends/family, and prepare for departure. This is commonly referred to as the "Grace Period." During this 30 (thirty) day grace period, J-1 exchange visitors are no longer in J-visa status, and are then under the jurisdiction of the USCIS. Under no circumstances can exchange visitors continue and/or complete exchange activities during the grace period; this includes taking classes/final exams, conducting research, or participating in Academic Training/internships. Please note that while you may travel within the U.S., it is not recommend that you travel beyond the borders of the United States as you may not be permitted re-entry. You are responsible for any expenses you incur during the 30 (thirty) day grace period, which begins the day after the End Date of your BSMP scholarship indicated on your Form DS-2019. You are responsible for covering any incidental expenses you incur during this time, and during your trip home, from allowances previously received.
    • 30 Final Departure from the U.S. EMERGENCY DEPARTURE OR WITHDRAWAL If it becomes necessary for you to return home for an extended period of time before the end of your exchange visitor program, you must consult your International Student Advisor, CAPES/CNPq, and IIE to obtain approval for your departure. Should such an emergency arise, please inform IIE of your situation immediately. In the event you choose to withdraw from your authorized program voluntarily, or it is terminated by your host institution(s), before the original end date of your authorized program, you must notify IIE immediately and submit a Withdrawal Form and/or Final Report Departure Form.
    • Scholarship Overview
    • 32 Scholarship Overview It is important that you understand all of the details and policies of your scholarship. In this section, you will find information regarding all aspects of the program. STIPENDS & ALLOWANCES As part of your BMSP scholarship, CAPES/CNPq will provide you with a monthly stipend of $300, unless you reside in a city that CAPES deems as a “High Cost City.” This stipend is paid quarterly and is directly deposited by CAPES/CNPq into your bank account. CAPES/CNPq will also provide you with a one-time settling-in allowance of $1,300 and one-time coursework aid allowance of $1,000 to help cover expenses, which includes all books and academic supplies. Students that are continuing from the fall to spring semester qualify for an additional winter break stipend of $1,300 administered by IIE. It will be issued by the end of November. CAPES/CNPq will deposit these allowances into your bank account in Brazil. From time to time CAPES and CNPq may also issue additional stipends for authorized break periods. If applicable, amount and distribution instructions will be provided to you at a later date. Unless clarified otherwise, all questions regarding stipends or allowances must be directed to CAPES or CNPq directly. CAPES/CNPq reserves the right to revise or adjust your financial scholarship provisions if conditions so require. ROOM AND BOARD, ACADEMIC TUITION AND FEES On behalf of CAPES/CNPq, IIE will pay the cost of your tuition and related academic fees (Deposits and Application Fees), room, board (meal plan) and health insurance premium. Academic tuition and fees must be for course loads of 12 to 15 credits and consist of at least 75% of credits directly related to your field of study. Housing must be in shared living arrangements (dorm room, suite, on-campus apartment). Board will be taken in your host institution’s dining facilities and will be for a maximum of three meals a day (or the equivalent number of points). You are responsible for informing the appropriate offices at your host institution to invoice IIE directly. Your BSMP scholarship does NOT cover:  Health insurance charges, such as co-pays, deductibles or co-insurance.  Fees due to your own negligence, such as lost keys or lost student I.D.  Unwarranted academic fees, such as reducing the number of credits that you are taking after your host institution’s published deadlines. Even if you did not attend the course, you will be held responsible for paying any tuition or fees pertaining to the credits dropped.  Personal expenses, such as travel during breaks, additional clothing, personal items, and other expenses of this nature. HOUSING BSMP students have pre-arranged and assigned housing. If you have not already received information about housing from your host institution, you should inquire immediately with your International Student Advisor or Housing Office (see your TOA). Read all information on housing carefully and follow instructions. Return any housing applications immediately; do not wait until you arrive in the United States because housing fills up quickly. On-campus Housing All on-campus housing must be double-occupancy rooms (shared rooms) with shared living accommodations at the standard- rate offered at your host institution. If you choose a premium housing option such as luxury apartments, duplexes, or single rooms, you will be responsible for the extra cost of housing. You will need to pay for the difference in price from the standard room before your host institution or the company providing you with housing invoices IIE.
    • 33 Scholarship Overview If there are no double‐occupancy rooms available, you may live in a single room on‐campus. However, you must provide proof from your host institution confirming that there are no double‐occupancy rooms available. You must receive approval from IIE before you are allowed to live in a single room. Off-campus Housing If housing on-campus is not available, inquire about your host institution’s off-campus housing options. Please contact the Residential/Housing Office on campus to assist you with finding local accommodations. Rooms should be fully furnished with desk, chair, bed, and living room couch. There is no maximum amount for off-campus housing, however, you should be housed in a standard shared room unless none are available. IIE will check to ensure students have found living accommodations that are affordable and not premium. Lease Agreements IIE will cover all rent and utilities as required by your institution or the facility providing you with the appropriate accommodations. If you are living on-campus, IIE will pay the institution directly for your room. If you are living off-campus, the rental agency needs to send IIE a billing statement in order for IIE to pay the fee for the term or calendar year depending on your terms of agreement. Please be advised that IIE will NOT sign the Lease Agreement; only YOU can. The agreement has to be between you and your landlord. IIE’s legal department can provide a “Lease Side Letter” to substitute for signing the lease. The Lease Side Letter states that IIE will make payment for rent utilities, deposits, and application fees for your accommodation. IIE can pay the lease agreement amount in full or per term if needed. Before signing any lease, please be certain that it meets BSMP off-campus housing guidelines, and that the provider will be able to bill IIE. Please refer to the Finance Frequently Asked Questions at this link: http://www.iie.org/en/ Programs/Brazil-Scientific-Mobility/Current-Students/Finance. (See the section called “Housing.”) Subletting Rooms or Changing Residences You are not allowed to sublet rooms without prior approval unless you have an emergency. If you think your case is an emergency please email IIE explaining your particular situation. You may be required to submit sufficient support and evidence. You must update your address with IIE and your host intuition any time you change your residence; this includes rooms. Failure to do so will result in delayed receipt of important documents, such as health insurance and banking cards, and will put your legal status in jeopardy. Important note: IIE cannot make monthly payments on your behalf. It is important that your housing provider invoices IIE per term or year. MEALS You should select the option that provides three meals per day. If your host institution does not offer a meal plan that can accommodate three meals a day, you are approved to purchase extra dining points to ensure three meals a day. Should you wish, you may choose the unlimited meal plan if your US institution offers it. Campus cash-only meal plans are not allowed. If your host institution does not provide a meal plan that will give you 21 meals per week, you must inform IIE during the first 30 days of your authorized program so that proper adjustments can be made. If you have food allergies and need an individualized meal plan, you will need to inform your host institution officials and provide IIE with a document from a U.S. doctor confirming such necessity. Once you have provided IIE with this
    • 34 Scholarship Overview documentation, IIE will issue a formal authorization to your host institution to invoice IIE for a specialized meal plan that can accommodate your specific needs. BILLING Upon arrival at your campus you should take a copy of your TOA to the Bursar or Accounting Office and request that all billing statements and invoices for approved scholarship benefits be sent to IIE. Be sure to inform your host institution that your scholarship is “foreign-sourced income.” All questions or invoices for tuition and fees, room, board and health insurance premiums, should be directed to: Institute of International Education Attn: BSMP Finance—2nd Floor 809 United Nations Plaza New York, NY 10017-3580 You will most likely receive billing statements from your host institution via email or mail. Before sending any invoices to IIE, please contact the appropriate office of your host institution first and ask them to invoice IIE directly. Only if they do not invoice IIE directly are you permitted to forward the invoice to IIE; you must include a written statement/email from your host institution saying that they are unable to invoice IIE directly. Please note that it takes approximately 10 to 15 business days to process requests. This includes, but is not limited to, payments of invoices, application fees and housing deposits, processing of electronic funds transfers, reimbursements, financial guarantees, health insurance coverage, etc. Answers to additional billing & finance related FAQs are provided at: http://www.iie.org/Programs/Brazil-Scientific- Mobility/Current-Students/Finance. Please refer to the FAQs before emailing or calling IIE. Many of the most common questions and concerns are addressed there.
    • Receiving Scholarship Funds & Banking in the U.S.
    • 36 Receiving Scholarship Funds & Banking in the U.S. It is important that you organize your finances in the correct way once you are in the U.S. Please find suggestions and tips for banking in the U.S. in this section of the handbook. BANKING IN THE U.S. As soon as you arrive at your host institution, you should open an account at a local bank. If you have transferred funds from your home bank, you will probably choose its correspondent bank in the U.S. if it is conveniently located. If not, ask your International Student Advisor to suggest an appropriate institution. Although the bank you select will offer you many different kinds of accounts, they will generally fall into two catego‐ ries: a. Savings accounts, which pay interest at a modest rate but limit the number of withdrawals per month and often require your presence at the bank to handle the transaction, and b. Checking accounts, which will be most useful because they are designed to help depositors pay their bills by writing checks that can be sent safely through the mail (to pay rent or utility bills, for example) or handed to cashiers in local stores. Some checking accounts are offered without a fee but require that you maintain a minimum balance; others require no balance but debit the account a monthly service charge as well as a small fee for each check cashed. The bank customer service staff will list the options for you. Most banks issue an ATM (Automatic Teller Machine) or debit card that allows bank customers to access funds in their accounts through machines that are open 24 (twenty-four) hours a day. These are located outside the bank. Increasing‐ ly, grocery stores, gas stations and other stores have installed machines that allow you to pay for your purchases at the check-out counter or gas pump using your ATM or credit card. Remember to take your receipt with you. It is important to note that checks drawn on out-of-town banks will take approximately 5 (five) business days to clear, (i.e., the time required for the money to be transferred from one bank to the other before it will be available to you). STIPENDS AND ELECTRONIC FUND TRANSFERS (EFT) IIE will send you additional information to enroll in Electronic Funds Transfer (EFT). Enrolling in EFT will allow IIE to di‐ rectly deposit any funds approved by CAPES/CNPq into your U.S. bank account. In order to participate in EFT, you will
    • 37 Receiving Scholarship Funds & Banking in the U.S. need to open a bank account once you arrive and complete the BSMP Funds Deposit Authorization Agreement Form, found at: http://www.iie.org/Programs/Brazil-Scientific-Mobility/Current-Students/Materials. Please carefully review and complete these documents. PERSONAL FUNDS AND WIRE TRANSFERS Your scholarship will not cover health insurance charges such as co-pays, deductibles or co-insurance; or other personal expenses such as travel during breaks, additional clothing, personal items, and other expenses of this nature. You should plan on bringing any personal funds available to you so you can adequately meet your needs and expectations concerning your health, travel, recreation and incidental expenses. It is important that you budget your funds carefully. You are strongly advised to bring some personal funds with you in the form of traveler’s checks to cover expenses dur‐ ing transit and immediately after your arrival. When you arrive at the airport in the U.S., it is useful to change some money (traveler’s checks or foreign currency) into U.S. dollars to pay for transportation to campus, tips for baggage handling, hotel, and other possible expenses. If your government does not restrict the exchange of currency, you may wish to transfer some personal funds to the U.S. This can be done by instructing your bank to issue a foreign draft on a bank near your U.S. host institution with which your bank has a correspondent relationship. Upon arrival, you can then open an account at that bank and draw on the funds or arrange for the funds to be transferred to a more conveniently located banking institution. CREDIT CARDS Credit/charge cards are widely used in the U.S.. The most popular cards are those issued by American Express, Visa, Master‐ Card, and Diner’s Club, but there are many others available from credit companies with a local focus and from individual shops and department stores. Ordinarily, cards are issued only to applicants with a substantial income and proof of past credit worthiness. The safest place to apply for a credit card is at your bank. Given the complexity of credit checking outside the U.S., it can be difficult for exchange students to qualify for cards once they are in the U.S. However, if you can obtain one before you leave home, you will find it useful, especially if you should wish to rent a car. Credit companies bill monthly and charge interest at very high rates (12–21 percent annual rate) on any unpaid balance from the previous month. Some companies, such as American Express, require payment in full at the end of the month. Although no interest is charged on the current month’s bills, there are sometimes hidden costs for the convenience of credit. Credit Card “Dos”  Do shop around. If you get a solicitation in the mail, on campus, on the Internet or at the local bank, com‐ pare rates and fees. The credit card industry is very competitive so interest rates, credit limits, grace peri‐ ods, annual fees, terms and conditions vary. You may check http://www.creditcard.com or http:// www.bankrate.com to compare rates.  Do read the fine print on the credit application. The application is a contract, so read it thoroughly before signing. Watch for terms such as "introductory rate" and periods that expire.  Do ask questions. You are the customer and the bank is providing a service. If you don't understand some‐ thing, ask.  Do be wary of anyone who claims they can "fix" your credit. The only thing that can fix a credit report is time and a positive payment history.  Do promptly open and review your bill every month. This helps you pay your bill on time and protects you from identity theft and unauthorized charges.  Do be careful with your credit card. Keep it secure. Always have your bank's phone number available in
    • 38 Receiving Scholarship Funds & Banking in the U.S. case your card is lost or stolen.  Do view credit as an investment in your future. By using credit wisely, you can build a good credit history.  Do order a copy of your credit report annually. Your credit report is like an academic report card – it evalu‐ ates your performance as a credit customer. It needs to be accurate so you can apply for other loans such as a car or a condo. Credit Card “Don'ts”  Don't feel pressure to get a credit card if you don't want one. A credit card may not be right for you. Don't be afraid to say no to salespeople. It's okay to walk away.  Don't pay your bills late. Late payments can hurt your credit rating.  Don't spend more than you can afford. A credit card is not magic money; it's a loan with an obligation to repay. Realize the difference between needs and wants. Do you really need that CD or pizza? If you charge these items and only pay the minimum, you could be paying for them months from now.  Don't apply for more credit cards if you already have balances on others.  Don't ignore the signs of credit trouble. If you pay only the minimum balance, pay late or use cash advanc‐ es to pay living expenses, you might be in the credit "danger zone."
    • Health Insurance & Staying Healthy
    • 40 Health Insurance & Staying Healthy Please make sure the following is true of your host institution’s insurance plan:  IIE will be invoiced directly.  The current health coverage meets J‐1 visa requirements.  You will have coverage for the duration of your entire program. If any of the above is false, you must inform IIE immediately. You will need to be enrolled in IIE’s private health plan for the duration of your authorized program. Upon arrival you will be required to complete and submit the BSMP Health Insurance Confirmation Form. You must submit this form within 10 (ten) days of your arrival in the U.S. Should you have any questions about the content of the form, you should print it out and visit your on-campus health center/office to ask for assistance. HEALTH INSURANCE REQUIREMENTS Your health insurance must meet the following the J‐1 regulations: 1. Medical benefits of at least $50,000 per accident or illness; 2. Repatriation of remains in the amount of $7,500; 3. Expenses associated with medical evacuation of the exchange visitor to his or her home country in the amount of $10,000 4. A deductible not to exceed $500 per accident or illness. 5. An insurance policy secured to fulfill the requirements of this section: a. May require a waiting period for pre-existing conditions which is reasonable as determined by current industry standards; b. May include provision for co-insurance under the terms of which the exchange visitor may be required to pay up to 25 (twenty-five) percent of the covered benefits per accident or illness; 6. Policy must be underwritten by an insurance corporation having an A.M. Best rating of “A-” or have; an Insurance Solvency International, Ltd. (ISI) rating of “A-” or above; a Weiss Research, Inc. rating of B+ or above. Important Notes:  If you are considering arriving in the U.S. prior to the Start Date on your Form DS-2019, or remain in the U.S. for any portion of your 30 (thirty) day grace period, it is highly recommended that you purchase traveler’s health insurance coverage.  You are fully responsible for covering the cost of immunizations, dental care, medical care, etc. not covered by your host institution’s or IIE’s health insurance plans. Please be prepared to incur out-of-pocket expenses such as co-pays, deductibles, co-insurance, etc. or services not covered by your health insurance plan.  IIE is not authorized to pay medical providers/insurance companies or reimburse BSMP students for any health insurance charges (co-pays, deductibles, co-insurance, etc.) beyond the policy premium. IIE will insomuch as possible try to answer any questions or provide general guidance, but you are ultimately responsible for resolving and/or the payment thereof. FAILURE TO OBTAIN NECESSARY HEALTH INSURANCE COVERAGE IS A VIOLATION OF YOUR EXCHANGE VISITOR IMMIGRATION STATUS AND MAY LEAD TO PROGRAM TERMINATION.
    • 41 Health Insurance & Staying Healthy UNDERSTANDING YOUR HEALTH INSURANCE POLICY In order to better understand your insurance policy and be better prepared should you need to seek medical care, you should know the answers to the following questions:  What does my insurance plan cover?  What is not covered?  Is there co-pay, co-insurance or a deductible?  Where can I seek medical care and what are the hours of service?  Who are the doctors that provide services in the network of my insurance plan?  What is a claim form? When do I need it? Where do I find it and where do I submit it?  Is there a dental or vision plan? Do I need dental or vision coverage?  When do I need a prescription?  Is there a co-pay for prescriptions?  Where is the nearest pharmacy? Important Notes:  No matter what the possible cost, your health and well-being must always come first, so it is of the utmost importance that you see a doctor if you are injured or ill. Please use your best judgment, or consult an advisor, to assess which medical care facility is appropriate for your current condition.  It is your sole responsibility to keep yourself up-to-date on any changes to your health insurance plan and coverage dates.  You are fully responsible for covering the cost of immunizations, dental care, medical care, etc. not covered by your host institution’s or IIE’s health insurance plans. Please be prepared to incur out-of-pocket expenses such as co-pays, deductibles, co-insurance, etc. or services not covered by your health insurance plan.  Not all health insurance plans cover pre-existing conditions and the costs associated with treatment. A pre- existing condition is any condition which (i) originated prior to your effective date of coverage or (ii) you received consultation/treatment/medication from a physician prior to your effective date of coverage. If there is a medicine you take for a pre-existing condition, you should secure enough in your home country for the time you will be in the U.S. It is very important to have all necessary dental care completed prior to your departure. Most dental care is not covered in a health insurance plan and it can be very expensive in the U.S. THE U.S. HEALTHCARE SYSTEM A major difference between the U.S. and many other countries is how the health care system works. In the U.S., healthcare is privatized. In other words, there is no universal national health care plan. This makes it very expensive to receive treatment and medicine without health insurance. Additionally, there are specific laws that govern which medications require a doctor’s prescription, and which do not. International students and scholars are also not eligible for financial assistance from the U.S. government or from their host institution to pay medical bills. A few additional facts to know about the U.S. health care system are:  Payment is the responsibility of the individual patient, with or without health insurance, and patients are
    • 42 Health Insurance & Staying Healthy fully responsible for seeing that bills are submitted and that claim forms are properly completed.  Some doctors providing services at a hospital may bill patients separately.  Co-pays or pre-certification authorizations are usually expected at the time the care is given.  The reimbursement process of an insurance provider takes time, and incomplete or incorrect forms can cause further delays.  Not all health insurance plans cover pre-existing conditions and the costs associated with treatment; others have very low coverage limits or waiting periods.  All patients’ privacy must be respected and be kept confidential by law. With a few exceptions, licensed physicians, nurses or other medical care staff, including psychologists and other mental health professionals, are not permitted to discuss a patient’s medical symptoms, conditions, illness or treatment without written consent. These few exceptions include a life-threatening condition, an unconscious state leaving someone unable to make a decision, or abuse.  Life-threating situations are defined as conditions that require immediate attention at an emergency room. For example, uncontrolled bleeding, high fever, broken bones, seizures or unconsciousness. Recommendations:  Upon arrival visit your on-campus health center to better understand what services it offers, when it is open, and what you need to do to receive care. It is also recommended that you ask the health center staff what you need to do if the center is not open and you need immediate medical care. They should also be able to tell you where the nearest off-campus urgent-care clinic or hospital emergency room is located.  Always be aware of your own health needs and background, and be ready to explain your symptoms and conditions from the onset to a physician or nurse. When doing so be prepared to tell them what medications or treatments you have taken or are currently taking, and try not to feel intimidated. Always tell the truth.  Always feel free to ask as many questions about your condition, treatment, medical procedure or cost as you’d like, even if you have already left the office. In the U.S. it is appropriate to seek second or third opinions from different doctors before deciding on a course of treatment.  Always keep copies of your past medical records with you.  If you need to seek medical care, use your best judgment to assess which medical care facility is appropriate for your current condition.  Prior to your arrival check with your host institution’s health center to see if you need to complete a medical form and/or submit immunization documentation. Many States in the U.S. now require students to have immunizations (tuberculosis, measles/mumps/rubella, hepatitis, influenza, meningitis) before they are able to register for classes. STAYING HEALTHY Staying healthy will have a direct positive effect on your overall exchange experience, and academic success. To have a happy and healthy exchange experience, you not only need to understand the U.S. health care system and insurance policy, but also know how to manage stress and approach American food. Managing Stress Adjusting to life in a new culture can be stressful at times, but it should be viewed as a time of personal growth and
    • 43 Health Insurance & Staying Healthy challenge. You will find that things are different – some things you will like and some you will not. In either case, knowing that you will become frustrated at times (trying to find your way around, making new friends, understanding what is being said) and knowing how to manage this frustration will be very helpful. If you notice a change in your mental outlook or sleeping or eating habits, or experience symptoms such as stomach aches, constipation, fatigue, headaches and heart erythema, it is important to seek assistance by going to the health or consulting center or international student office. Sometimes finding someone who will listen and try to objectively help find solutions to a problem will be just what is needed. It is also essential to find balance, not trying to do too much and making sure you have time to exercise regularly and do activities that you enjoy. It is proven that exercise on regular basis helps reduce stress and increase physical and mental energy. Most campuses have a recreation center where students can play on intramural teams or borrow/rent equipment. In order to be better prepared, you should visit your host institution’s counseling and recreational websites or stop in their offices to find out:  How are U.S. values different from my own?  What is cultural adjustment?  How can I manage my time better?  What types of facilities are there?  Where are they located and at what times are they open?  Do I need to make an appointment/sign up, or can I just drop-in? Approaching American Food Diet and nutrition are one of the most difficult challenges international students face when they are trying to adjust to surroundings. This can be especially hard in the U.S. where familiar foods from your home country are rare, including certain ingredients and Kosher or Halal dishes, and many cafeterias are full of high-fat, low fiber foods such as pizza, burgers, fried chicken, and French fries. To minimize the adjustment to food in the U.S. and potential health problems, you need to make sure you are eating in moderation and making healthy choices. Try to choose a variety of foods, ones that are high in dietary fiber and low in fat or sugar. Many cafeterias now offer salad bars, vegetarian meals, soups, and sandwich stations. These tend to be healthy options. International restaurants and specialty food stores are becoming more and more common. You can ask at the international student office or other international students on your campus where to find these restaurants or stores. In order to be better prepared, you should visit your host institution’s dining website or stop in at the dining office to find out:  What types of on-campus dining facilities are there?  Where are they located and at what times are they open?  Can I take any food (an apple or banana) with me for later?  Do they have nutritional facts or serving information on the food they serve?  Do they have weekly menus so you can plan where and when you will eat?  Do they have information about making nutritious choices or do they offer any tips for eating healthy?  What are the local restaurants and grocery stores in the community?  Are there places on- or off-campus that sell ethnic foods?
    • Academic Training (AT)
    • 45 Academic Training (AT) BSMP students are strongly encouraged to actively seek and partake in a work-related experience, also known as Academic Training (AT) that directly relates to their field-of-study while participating in the program. The scope of this policy falls directly in line with the greater BSMP objective of widening the academic and research exchange between the U.S. and Brazil and increasing Brazilian initiatives in sciences, technology and innovation. To help achieve this program objective , IIE has set up systems to connect you with meaningful AT providers, and assist you in your application process. J-1 REQUIREMENTS & ELIGIBILITY Although J-1 student exchange visitors are eligible under federal regulations to engage in various types of employment, BSMP students are only permitted to take part in AT. The authorization to engage in AT is under the discretion and permission of IIE and established program policy. To be eligible, BSMP students must not only have successfully completed one semester, one trimester, or two quarters of coursework, but also maintain full-time academic and J-1 status and be of good academic standing. Full-time course of study ranges from 12 to 18 (twelve to eighteen) credits depending on the host institution. Good academic standing is defined as maintaining a GPA of 2.0 or higher while simultaneously fulfilling all the requirements that a host institution applies to its non-degree students. In order for BSMP students to be eligible for AT, the following additional requirements must be met:  The primary purpose of the exchange program must be the student’s academic studies; it cannot be AT.  AT must take place at a specific employment or training site and must be directly related to the student’s field-of-study noted on her/his Form DS-2019.  Students must receive written approval for the duration and type of AT from IIE and respective AT provider and academic/international student advisor or dean prior to beginning employment, or related orientations. Important Notes:  Time spent engaging in the training cannot exceed the time spent in the program of study (i.e., a student engaging in a 6-month course of non-degree study cannot be authorized for more than 6 (six) months of AT).  J-1 visa regulations stipulate that exchange visitor students in medical, dental, and veterinary fields of study are not allowed to have any contact with patients during their program cycle in the U.S.  Should you not be able to find an opportunity in the area where your host institution is located (which is preferred), you may be permitted to move to another city/state to engage in such activities.  If a BSMP student is unable to secure AT, then he/she must submit proof from his/her academic/ international student advisor or dean to IIE, verifying that he/she was unsuccessful in securing AT. It is only after this that a BSMP student would potentially have the option of alternative activities such as additional summer coursework. STUDENT EMPLOYMENT In accordance with J-1 exchange visitor regulations, student employment is defined as all other types of work not associated with AT and/or related to the student’s field of study. Under no circumstances should you accept employment of any kind. BSMP is a fully funded scholarship, so requests for work authorization for financial hardship will not be considered. Should a BSMP student experience a serious economic hardship due to an unforeseen change in his/her financial
    • 46 Academic Training (AT) situation, he/she is strongly encouraged to inform IIE and CAPES/CNPq immediately. SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER (SSN) AND INDIVIDUAL TAXPAYER IDENTIFICATION NUMBER (ITIN) Every person who receives income in the U.S. is identified by either a Social Security Number (SSN) or an Individual Taxpayer Identification Number (ITIN). These are unique personal identification numbers, widely used in the U.S. Although your scholarship payments are issued by CAPES/CNPq, IIE recommends that you obtain an SSN or ITIN. Should you earn income during your AT, you will need it. If you have been issued an SSN during a previous stay in the U.S., bring it with you, as it will still be valid. Applying for an SSN To apply for an SSN, you must appear in person at the office of the Social Security Administration nearest your host institution. Take the following documents with you: 1. Completed Form SS-5, Application for a Social Security Card (available online at http://www.ssa.gov) 2. Passport with proof of J-1 visa 3. Form DS-2019 4. Form I-94 5. Terms of Appointment issued by IIE 6. AT Authorization Letter issued by IIE 7. One other document that establishes your age and identity It is extremely important that your name on the application for a SSN be spelled exactly the same way it is spelled on your passport and on your Form DS-2019. Upon submitting your application and documents, the Social Security Administration will verify your immigration status through Systematic Alien Verification for Entitlements (SAVE) Program. SAVE is populated by data collected in SEVIS by the DHS at the time you were admitted to the U.S. Applying for an ITIN If you are not eligible for a SSN, you will need to apply for an ITIN. To apply for an ITIN you should go to the nearest IRS office and complete Form W-7. For more specific instructions on applying for an ITIN, go to: http://www.irs.gov/ Individuals/Individual-Taxpayer-Identification-Number-(ITIN). TAXES The income tax season in the U.S. is from January 1st to April 15th of each calendar year. During this time, all people residing or who have resided in the U.S., including international students and scholars, for any time between January and December of the year prior are required to comply with U.S. tax requirements and file income tax returns. Under the provisions of the Tax Reform Act of 1986, certain scholarships made to foreign students are generally subject to withholding for income tax purposes and may lead to tax liability unless the scholarship is used to pay tuition or other instructional fees. Your scholarship funds from the Government of Brazil are not subject to withholding, but it is your sole responsibility, as required by the federal U.S. Internal Revenue Service (IRS), to complete and submit Parts I and III of Form 8843 at the end of the calendar year. The form and instructions can be found at http://www.irs.gov/ uac/Form-8843,-Statement-for-Exempt-Individuals-and-Individuals-With-a-Medical-Condition-1.
    • 47 If you participate in AT and receive any income from your AT provider, then this income is subject to U.S. income tax regulations and withholding of all local, state and federal taxes, except social security. It is your sole responsibility to obtain all proper tax documents from your AT provider. These tax documents (e.g. W-2, Form 1099MISC, etc.) are generally issued and sent in January of the subsequent year, and summarize income earned and the taxes withheld or already paid to the respective federal, city and/or local governments. It is your responsibility to inquire with the IRS and respective State tax authorities to see if you are required to pay additional tax on this income. Please note that IIE will not be able to assist you with Federal, State or City/Local tax filing preparation, however, below is some general guidance. If you were present in the U.S. for any part of the calendar year AND earned any U.S. source income in that calendar year, then you must:  Complete and submit Form 8843 as mentioned above.  Complete and submit Form 1040NR or 1040NR-EZ or Form 1040 or Form 1040-EZ (depending on if you are considered a Resident or a Nonresident for tax purposes).  Complete and submit any required State, City/Local tax forms for the state(s), cities/localities in which you lived/worked. Below are resources that can provide assistance with tax filing preparation:  International Student and Scholar Office – many ISSO’s have workshops and/or have contracted specialized tax preparation software or services to help their international students with tax filings.  Local IRS Taxpayer Assistance Centers – most communities have assistance centers that are open to the public and provide tax preparation services and advising (http://www.irs.gov/uac/Contact-Your-Local-IRS- Office-1).  State/City Departments of Revenue – many state/city governments have specific websites that list forms, instructions and other resources that can provide guidance on filing obligations.  Examples of Helpful University Resources – the following websites are very helpful in trying to understand tax filing requirements and forms for international students:  University of Cincinnati (http://www.uc.edu/international/services/taxes.html)  University of Missouri (http://cashiers.missouri.edu/aliens.html)  University of Tennessee (http://www.uthsc.edu/international/taxfaq.php) Academic Training (AT)
    • United States Society, Culture, & Government
    • 49 United States Society, Culture, & Government It is very exciting and challenging to find yourself immersed in a new culture. In this section, you may find some helpful information about the U.S. way of life. CHARACTERISTICS OF AMERICANS It is not easy to make generalizations about the United States — above all, it is a land of diversity. The size of the country, its geographic and climatic differences, and the ethnic mix of its people all contribute to its variety. Still, there are a few characteristics you will encounter in “typical” Americans from the Atlantic to the Pacific. For example, Americans tend to value their individuality, to think themselves the equal of any other man or woman, and to believe they are masters of their own destiny. They feel free to speak their minds on most subjects and are often astonishingly frank in expressing political opinions, cherishing above all other rights the freedom of speech guaranteed by the United States Constitution. They are direct in their communication; they ask questions when they need information; they say “no” when they mean no. Americans do not commonly exhibit class consciousness or make distinctions amongst themselves along class lines. If anything, the vast majority identify themselves as belonging to the middle class. Except for perhaps the very rich or very poor, Americans do not usually feel that their success in life will be determined by the social class into which they were born and do not usually show excessive deference or superiority to each other in public situations. Americans appear open and friendly at first meeting, but this means only that they are pleased to make your acquaintance; it may or may not lead to true friendship. They are informal; they often introduce themselves by their first names and call others by their first names on very slight acquaintance. In professional situations, however, it is preferable to address people using their title and last name (e.g., Dr. Smith, Ms. Jones) until they ask you to use their first name. Americans tend to stand at least an arm’s length apart when conversing and are not inclined to touch one another, except to shake hands upon greeting one another. They value their privacy and rarely visit even good friends, without telephoning first. Appointments/Punctuality It is always appropriate to make an appointment before visiting someone, particularly at an office. It is best to be on time for appointments. When they are professional in nature—an appointment with a doctor or a colleague at the university— you should appear within 5 (five) minutes of the time you have agreed upon. On social occasions, especially when the invitation is for a meal, plan to arrive no more than 10 to 15 (ten to fifteen) minutes after the appointed hour (but never before the hour—the hosts may not be ready.) In both cases, be sure to telephone if you are unavoidably delayed. Remember that public events such as concerts and university classes begin promptly at the scheduled time. Invitations If you accept an invitation or make an appointment, it is very important that you appear as promised since your hosts will have taken considerable trouble to prepare for your visit, and professional people will have arranged their schedules to accommodate you. It is perfectly acceptable to decline an invitation if it is not convenient for you, but some response is always called for. On a formal, written invitation, “RSVP” means “please reply.” It is not necessary to bring a gift unless the occasion is a birthday or Christmas party or perhaps if the invitation is for an entire weekend. In these cases, a simple, inexpensive gift of flowers, candy, a bottle of wine, or a small souvenir from your own country would be appropriate. A thank-you note to your host or hostess, especially following an overnight visit, is considerate. If you have been invited to go out for a meal, you should assume that all parties will pay for themselves, unless the invitation included a specific offer to pay for your food. Dietary Restrictions If health or religious beliefs restrict the foods that you can eat, you should feel free to explain this when you accept an
    • 50 invitation to visit. Such preferences are always understood; your host or hostess will usually be happy to take them into account when the menu is planned. You can also be assertive about dietary preferences or restrictions in a restaurant. Many places will try to accommodate your request. Smoking Restrictions It is now quite common in the United States for cigarette smoking to be either restricted or completely prohibited in public places. This includes restaurants, airplanes and other public transportation, theaters, stores, museums, and many office and university buildings. Cigar and pipe smoking are almost always prohibited. You should also be aware that Americans often object to guests smoking in their homes, and it is considered a courtesy to inquire whether your host will mind before you “light up.” Asking Questions Probably the best advice this handbook can give is to suggest you ask questions whenever you need guidance or information. Americans do so freely and never think that inquiries are a sign of ignorance or weakness. On the contrary, questions indicate interest, and you will find most people glad to be of help. CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE U.S. The United States is one of the most culturally diverse countries in the world. This cultural diversity stems from having had a steady flow of immigration from different parts of the world for over 150 years, which contributed to the already existing culture. These immigrant populations have influenced both the cultural as well as the physical landscape of their environment. The degree to which each group’s influence is felt depends on the density of a given ethnic group and the length of time that the community has been in the United States. The 2010 United State Census found that 12.9% of people living in the United States are foreign born and 18% of households speak a language other than English at home. The largest groups of immigrants in the last ten years have been from: Latin America and the Caribbean (53%), Asia (28%), Europe (12%), Africa (4%), Northern America (2%), and less than 1% in Oceania. Climate and geography are other factors that play a role in the cultural diversity of the United States. This is reflected in the lifestyle differences found in the various regions of the United States expressed through their choices in architecture, cuisine, leisure activities, etc. THE LAW & CIVIL RIGHTS The United States is governed by the “rule of law.” It must be observed by every resident, including the President and other public officials, and can be changed only through established legislative procedures. The law also offers everyone its equal protection; it applies to everyone equally, regardless of position or wealth. The Constitution of the United States, which supersedes all federal, state, and local law, protects all persons within the borders of the country. With the exception of a few laws that regulate such matters as immigration and voting, foreign nationals enjoy the same rights and privileges as American citizens. They also have the same obligations under the law. The first 10 amendments to the Constitution, collectively termed the Bill of Rights, contain this country’s most cherished legal principles, among which are the following:  the right to freedom of religion, speech, press, and assembly.  the right to refuse to testify against oneself, to keep silent rather than answer questions that might be incriminating.  the right to protection against unreasonable search and seizure. United States Society, Culture, & Government
    • 51  the right to “due process,” to be safe from punishment under the law unless—and until—specified, orderly procedures have been followed. For example, persons charged with a crime need not prove their innocence; rather, they are considered innocent until proven guilty. They are also entitled to representation by legal counsel, appointed by the court if a defendant cannot pay for such services. The body of civil law regulates contractual relationships between individuals. If one party to a contract fails to observe its conditions, the injured party can ask the court to enforce the terms or demand compensation for loss or damages. The Exchange Visitor Program Regulations promulgated by the U.S. Department of State govern the requirements for your J-1, and any dependent’s J-2, visa. These regulations implement the Mutual Educational and Cultural Exchange Act of 1961, as amended. In September 1996, the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act of 1996 (IIRIRA) was enacted, which directed the development of an electronic information collection system, known to you as SEVIS, for individuals in J visa status. In October 2001, the USA PATRIOT Act subsequently amended IIRIRA and mandated that the SEVIS database be implemented by January 2003 as part of its underlying effort to facilitate information sharing and cooperation among government agencies. Other laws were also passed by Congress that further defined the types of information to be collected and maintained in SEVIS. Thus, it is important for you to be aware that, although the electronic collection of exchange visitor information is a new practice and the SEVIS database a new tool for United States government agencies, the laws that have promoted educational and cultural exchanges and have defined the requirements for your J-1 and J-2 visas have been in effect for over five decades. ELECTORAL COLLEGE The Electoral College was established by the founding fathers as a compromise between election of the president by Congress and election by popular vote. The electors are a popularly elected body chosen by the 50 States and the District of Columbia on the Tuesday after the first Monday in November. The Electoral College consists of 538 electors (one for each of 435 members of the House of Representatives and 100 Senators; and 3 for the District of Columbia. Each State’s allotment of electors is equal to the number of House members to which it is entitled plus two Senators. The United States Census is used to reapportion the number of electors allocated among the states. The term “electoral college” does not appear in the Constitution. Article II of the Constitution and the 12th Amendment refer to “electors,” but not to the “electoral college.” In the early 1 800s, the term “electoral college” came into general usage as the unofficial designation for the group of citizens selected to cast votes for President and Vice President. It was first written into Federal law in 1845. The slates of electors are generally chosen by the political parties. State laws vary on the appointment of electors. Electors are often selected to recognize their service and dedication to their political party. They may be state-elected officials, party leaders, or persons who have a personal or political affiliation with the Presidential candidate. The electors meet in each State on the first Monday after the second Wednesday in December. A majority of 270 electoral votes is required to elect the President and Vice President. No Constitutional provision or Federal law requires electors to vote in accordance with the popular vote in their state. If no presidential candidate wins a majority of electoral votes, the 12th Amendment to the Constitution provides for the presidential election to be decided by the House of Representatives. The House would select the President by majority vote, choosing from the three candidates who receivedthe greatest number of electoralvotes. The vote would be takenby State, witheachState delegationhavingone vote.If no VicePresidential candidate wins a majority of electoral votes, the Senate would select the Vice President by majority vote, with each Senator choosing from the two candidates who received the greatest number of electoral votes. You can find additional information regarding the Electoral College in the following suggested websites:  http://www.archives.gov/federal_register/electoral_college  http://www.fec.gov/ United States Society, Culture, & Government
    • 52 United States Society, Culture, & Government
    • Higher Education in the U.S.
    • 54 Higher Education in the U.S. Higher education is the term used in the United States for formal education beyond the twelve years of elementary and secondary school. United States higher education is decentralized and diversified. Educational institutions may be supported by state funding, private organizations or religious denominations. Each United States institution of higher education is headed by a President or Chancellor and is usually controlled by a governing board of trustees or regents. Although there is a difference, the terms college and university are usually used interchangeably. The United States college has no exact counterpart in the educational system of any other country. Colleges are usually referred to as liberal arts colleges, although most offer courses in many fields, including the sciences. A college may be an independent institution or part of a university. A university is made up of a group of schools which include an undergraduate liberal arts college, graduate schools, and professional schools. Graduate study which prepares students for professional practice is largely a function of the university, but there are also many individual tax-supported professional and technical schools. The standards of professional schools are usually established by the professional associations and societies in each field. ACADEMIC YEAR The academic year lasts between thirty-two and thirty-six weeks, beginning in August or September and lasting through May or June. Most colleges and universities divide the school year into two equal parts called semesters or terms. Some divide the year into a system of three equal trimesters. Others have four quarters, of twelve weeks each, and require their students to attend classes during the three quarters, which fall between September and June. Many schools have summer sessions, which last from six to twelve weeks; tuition and fees for this period may be charged in addition to those paid for the academic year. UNDERGRADUATE COURSES At the undergraduate level, courses offered at each college or university and the regulations and requirements are listed in the college catalogue, published by each institution in print or made available on the university website. The first two years of an undergraduate program are devoted to general learning. Study programs include many subjects, and the scope of each subject is usually broad. Since they survey an entire field of study, they are usually taken as introductory courses or as prerequisites for more specialized courses. During the final two years of college student specialize in one subject by concentrating most of their courses in it. The field of concentration is called a major. Some courses are required for the degree and others may be chosen as electives. GRADUATE COURSES Graduate study is the advanced specialized studies leading to a master’s degree or a doctor’s degree and emphasizes preparing students for research or for professional practice. Graduate work leading to a Masters of Arts (M.A.) or Masters of Science (M.S.) degree requires a minimum of one year of study, but a two-year program of study is the norm, beyond the bachelor’s degree. The typical requirements for a master’s degree include successfully completing 32 to 36 (thirty-two to thirty-six) credits of graduate courses, including a minimum of 20 (twenty) credits in the major field of study; maintaining a minimum average of grade B; writing a thesis; and passing examinations in all required courses. Study for the master’s degree is sometimes undertaken as preparation for further graduate work or as an extension of the general education of the bachelor’s degree program. Degrees for doctor of philosophy (Ph.D.) and doctor of education (Ed.D.) require a minimum of three years full-time study beyond the master’s degree, but in most fields more is necessary. Graduate students attend lecture courses and seminars and carry out research under professional guidance. Graduate study leading to a doctorate emphasizes original research. METHODS OF TEACHING The method of teaching in most colleges and universities consists of lectures supplemented by reading assignments
    • 55 and class discussions between the professor and students. Science courses include lectures and laboratory periods. Art courses (except history of art courses) generally include lectures and studio classes in which the students work with artistic media. Education courses sometimes offer opportunities to observe class sessions and to practice teaching in elementary and secondary schools. Assignments usually call for the student to read a number of books and/ or articles and to write essays, reports, and/or term papers. Reading lists are distributed to the students at the beginning of the semester listing the reading material a student needs to read by a given date. Most examinations are written, not oral. Quizzes and tests are short examinations. They may be given regularly throughout the semester, or they may be unscheduled and even unannounced. Quizzes may consist of short questions requiring short responses. Common questions are ones that contain answers of “true” or “false” or a series of multiple choices and the correct one must be selected. Midterm examinations are usually longer than quizzes and are given in the middle of the school term. Finals are examinations which cover the subject matter of an entire course. Every course is worth a certain number of hours, credits or points, depending upon how many hours of lectures, class meetings, and laboratory work are offered each week. A course which lasts for one term and consists of three one-hour class periods a week is valued at three hours, points or credits. GRADING SYSTEMS Grading systems vary among institutions. Many employ the first five letters of the alphabet to denote levels of achievement. To receive full credit for their courses, students must maintain an average of grade ‘C’, considered a satisfactory level of academic work. ‘B’ denotes above-average or superior work and in most graduate programs a grade of ‘B’ is considered the lowest satisfactory grade. ‘A’ indicates excellent achievement. ‘D”, ‘E’, or ‘F’ symbolize unsatisfactory work. A student who receives a ‘D’ or ‘F’ as a final mark fails to receive credit for the course. The course therefore does not contribute toward his/her degree requirements. When a student receives an unsatisfactory grade for an examination or a course he or she is said to have failed. Often an elective course may be marked only Pass or Fail. Some schools use the symbol ‘I’ to denote incomplete work and allow the student to make up the work for a course after the end of the semester. If a student’s work is incomplete or unsatisfactory, the college may put him or her on probation – that is, allow him or her a period of time, usually one school term, in which to make up incomplete work and/or raise grades to a satisfactory standard. Many graduate schools make assistantships available to candidates for graduate degrees. Assistantships are in a sense paying jobs. Sometimes the assistant is paid in cash; sometimes he/she receives free tuition for his/her services. Assistantship duties range from grading papers or serving as a laboratory technician to teaching freshman courses or doing specialized research. In general research assistants will work on the projects of the particular school or department in which they are employed. Hours of service generally range from ten to fifteen per week, but some research assistants may be expected to devote up to the full 20 (twenty) hours. Higher Education in the U.S.
    • Appendix One—Holidays
    • 57 Appendix One—Holidays Most colleges and universities close for two weeks or more during the Christmas and New Year holidays in late December, as well as for several days between quarters or semesters. As you will note from your Terms and Conditions, you are expected to pay any extra expenses during vacations from your own funds or from the regular maintenance stipend you are receiving. Some dormitories and residence halls may be closed or may not serve meals during vacation periods. Students who wish to travel and sightsee during vacation periods may ask the Foreign Student Advisor’s office about any local trips planned for foreign students and visitors. OFFICIAL HOLIDAYS Official holidays are those days of celebration recognized by the U.S. government and usually include the closing of government offices and private businesses and banks. New Year’s Day (January 1): Although New Year’s Day is observed, New Year’s Eve is more important to Americans than New Year’s Day itself. Everyone gathers with friends and family to “ring out the old and ring in the new,” an expression that reflects the old custom of ringing church bells at midnight to greet the New Year. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Birthday (Third Monday in January): Martin Luther King, Jr., a distinguished African American, organized and led the civil rights movement in the United States during the 1960s in his capacity as the leader of the Southern Leadership Conference. During the 1963 March on Washington, he delivered the stirring and memorable “I have a dream” speech to a quarter million people gathered before the Lincoln Memorial. Dr. King received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1964 in recognition of his message of change through nonviolence to promote freedom, equality and dignity of all races and people. Presidents’ Day (Third Monday in February): This holiday commemorates the birthdays of George Washington, the first President of the United States, and Abraham Lincoln, President during the Civil War (1861–65). Memorial Day (Last Monday in May): Memorial Day is the day on which people in the United States honor those who died in the service of their country. Many families visit their loved ones’ graves and decorate them with flowers. The day is also marked with patriotic parades. This holiday is considered the beginning of the summer season. Independence Day (July 4): Independence Day commemorates the day the U.S. Declaration of Independence was signed in Philadelphia on July 4, 1776. Independence Day is celebrated all over the country with picnics, political speeches, parades, and community get-togethers that culminate in fire work displays. Labor Day (First Monday in September): This holiday was established in recognition of the labor movement’s contribution to the productivity of the country. This day marks the end of the summer season and is celebrated with picnics and other outings. Columbus Day (Second Monday in October) Official holiday in many states: By popular tradition, Columbus “discovered” America in 1492, although the continent was already populated by Native Americans and had been visited earlier by other seafarers. The holiday, originally and still occasionally celebrated on October 12, is chiefly observed by Americans of Italian descent with parades and festivals. In the Northeast, the long weekend is the high point of the season for viewing the brilliantly colored fall leaves. Veterans Day (November 11) Official holiday in many states: Originally established to commemorate Armistice Day— the end of the First World War— and celebrated on November 11, the date still observed in some areas, the holiday was changed after World War II to serve as an occasion to pay tribute to veterans of all wars. It is marked by parades, speeches, and the laying of wreaths at military cemeteries and war memorials.
    • 58 Thanksgiving Day (Fourth Thursday in November): The first Thanksgiving Day was observed by the pilgrims of Plymouth Colony in Massachusetts in 1621 to give thanks for the bountiful harvest and their ability to survive in the wilderness. Today, it is a time when Americans give thanks for the good life they enjoy. They celebrate by getting together with family and friends to eat traditional foods such as turkey, cranberry sauce, sweet potatoes, and pumpkin pie. Christmas (December 25): Many people regard this as the most celebrated holiday of the year, with the Christmas season extending from a few days before December 25 to January 1, New Year’s Day. Although originally a Christian holiday, commemorating the birth of Christ, people of many faiths join in the secular festivities common during this period. These include gift exchanges, the singing of holiday carols, visits to Santa Claus at the local shopping mall, and the decoration of a Christmas tree. Family members travel great distances to be together for Christmas, a day on which gifts are exchanged and a traditional dinner is shared. CULTURAL HOLIDAYS Cultural holidays are those days of public celebration where businesses are not necessarily closed. Valentine’s Day (February 14): A holiday celebrated by sending cards and giving candy in heart-shaped boxes and flowers to loved ones. Saint Patrick’s Day (March 17): Saint Patrick is the patron saint of Ireland, and this holiday was brought to the United States by Irish immigrants. People mark this day by wearing green clothing and getting together with friends to celebrate. Some U.S. cities with large Irish American populations, like Boston and New York, also hold Saint Patrick’s Day parades. Passover (8 days, usually in April): The Jewish holiday of Passover commemorates the liberation of the ancient Hebrews from slavery in Egypt in 1200 B.C. A highlight of the festival is the Seder, a ceremonial dinner attended by family and friends, during which the memory of the exodus is recounted through readings, singing, and the consumption of symbolic foods. Unleavened bread or matzoth is eaten during this time. Easter Sunday (the second Sunday after the Paschal Full Moon): Easter, the Sunday of Resurrection, Pascha, or Resurrection Day, is the most important religious feast of the Christians liturgical year, observed at some point between late March and late April each year (early April to early May in Eastern Christianity), following the cycle of the moon celebrates the resurrection of Jesus, which Christians believe occurred on the third day of his death by crucifixion some time in the period AD 27 to 33. Good Friday (Friday before Easter Sunday): is observed by many businesses including the New York Stock Exchange. Mother’s Day (Second Sunday in May): On this day, Americans honor their mothers with cards, flowers, and gifts from their family members. Father’s Day (Third Sunday in June): Fathers are honored on this day with cards and gifts from their family members. Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur (3 days in September and October) Not official holidays: The holidays of Rosh Hashanah (New Year) and Yom Kippur (Day of Atonement) and the 10-day interval between them comprise the most sacred period in the Jewish calendar. Known as the High Holy Days, this period combines the welcoming of the New Year with reflective examination of the course of one’s life during the past year. Rosh Hashanah is characterized by prayer, family feasts, and the sending of New Year’s greetings. Yom Kippur, the holiest day in the Jewish year, is a time of fasting and prayer. Halloween (October 31): In the United States, this day, the eve of a Christian holiday—All Hallowed’s or All Saints’ Day, which falls on November 1—has lost its original religious character. Today, it is largely celebrated as a children’s day. Appendix One—Holidays
    • 59 Traditions include carving out pumpkins with funny faces (jack‐o’-lanterns), telling scary stories, and going door to door in costume to receive candy and treats from neighbors. When a door opens after they knock, the children say “trick or treat,” meaning, “if you don’t give me a treat, I will trick you.” Many children and adults also attend costume parties and decorate their homes to celebrate Halloween. Hanukkah (8 days, usually in December): This Jewish holiday commemorates the successful uprising of a small band of Jews known as the Maccabees against their Hellenistic Syrian conqueror in 164 B.C. As part of the re-consecration of the Temple in Jerusalem, the victors lit a menorah or candelabrum with a small flask of holy oil that miraculously burned for 8 days. Hanukkah thus came to be known as the Festival of Lights and is celebrated today by the lighting of a menorah for 8 days. It is a time of conviviality and is marked by the gathering of family and friends and gift giving. Kwanza (7 days, December 26 through January 1): African-American nonreligious celebration of family and community patterned after African harvest festivals. Each day is dedicated to one of seven principles: unity, self-determination, collective responsibility, cooperative economics, purpose, creativity, and faith. Each evening, family members gather to light one of the candles in the kinara, a seven-branched candelabrum; often gifts are exchanged. Ramadan (9th month of the Islamic Lunar Calendar): Every day during this month, Muslims around the world spend the daylight hours in a complete fast; they abstain from food, drink, and other physical needs. Ramadan is a time to practice self-restraint, to cleanse the body and soul from impurities, and to refocus one's self on the worship of God. OTHER HOLIDAYS The United States is very culturally diverse and there are many communities with large immigrant populations. Such ethnic communities also celebrate their ethnic and religious holidays, such as: Chinese New Year, Diwali—the Hindu Festival of Lights, Cinco de Mayo and the Independence Day of several different countries. Different months are also designated to the celebration of different populations in the United States, such as: Black History Month (February), Women’s History Month (March), Hispanic Heritage Month (September 15 to October 15) and Asian- Pacific American Heritage Month (May). Appendix One—Holidays
    • Appendix Two—Weights & Measures
    • 61 Appendix Two—Weights & Measures Few Americans speak of weights and measures in metric terms. Temperature is the principal exception; these days, temperature is frequently quoted in both Fahrenheit and Celsius. METRIC CONVERSIONS
    • 62 Appendix Two—Weights & Measures CLOTHING SIZE CONVERSIONS Clothing sizes vary somewhat from one manufacturer to another. The charts below should be good basic guides. It is wise to always “try on” clothing before making a purchase.
    • Appendix Three—Money
    • 64 Appendix Three—Money SALES TAX You should be aware that state and local sales taxes—ranging up to 9 percent of the price, depending on the area—are added to the marked price of many items at the time of purchase. Thus, a $10 item with a 9 percent sales tax will actually cost $10.90. U.S. CURRENCY The American Monetary system follows the decimal system. The basic unit of the U.S. monetary system is the dollar, which can be divided into 100 cents. The “$” is the dollar symbol and a “¢” or “.” may appear to denote cents. Bills in denominations of $1, $5, $10 and $20 are the most widely used. There are also $50 and $100 bills. Please note that all bills are the same size and color. Coins may be used for self-service machines available in many public building to purchase soft drinks, coffee, or candy. Some forms of public transportation such as buses also allow you to use coins. You may also need coins to use public telephones, parking meters, and washing and drying machines in some dormitories or apartment buildings. You should note that most machines do not accept pennies (1 cent coins). Tipping for Service There are a number of circumstances in the United States when tipping is expected and, in fact, where tips make up a substantial portion of the wage of the person involved. Although tipping should be based on the quality of the service rendered, most people tip as follows:  to porters at airports and train or bus stations, $1 per piece of luggage (unless a set fee is posted in the terminal);  to bellboys who show you to your room and carry your baggage in hotels, a minimum of $1;  to waiters or waitresses in restaurants, 18-20 percent of the bill (for large groups, a service charge may already be included in the bill);  to taxi drivers, 10-15 percent of the fare;  to barbers or hairdressers, 10–20 percent of the bill. Unless they perform some unusual service for you, you need not tip hotel clerks, doormen, or chambermaids, nor is it customary to tip gas station attendants, theater ushers, bus drivers, or airline personnel. If you do not wish the services of a porter or bellboy, you can simply indicate your preference to handle your baggage yourself. Under no circumstances should you offer a tip to public officials, including police officers; this may be looked upon as an attempt to bribe the official and could have serious consequences.
    • 65 Appendix Three—Money
    • Appendix Four— Communication
    • 67 Appendix Four—Communication TELEPHONES The telephone system in the United States is composed of many privately owned but cooperating companies. The system is effective, and a good deal of business is conducted over the telephone. One can reserve hotel rooms, make travel reservations, buy theater tickets, and shop for any item one might want without leaving home. Telephone numbers in the U.S. contain 10 digits: a 3-digit area code, a 3-digit number for the local exchange (occasionally 2 letters and 1 digit), and a 4-digit number for the individual subscriber. Under the system, the United States is divided into many small regions or areas, each reached by an area code that must be dialed whenever you are calling outside your local area. Usually when you call a local number, only the exchange and individual subscriber number must be dialed. For example, the IIE number is: In some large metropolitan areas that span more than one area code, it may be necessary to dial the area code, as well, even if it is within the same area code. In most locations it is necessary to dial “1” before the area code if calling outside your local area. Be careful not to confuse the letter “I” with the numeral “1” or the letter “O” with the numeral “0” (zero). When calling outside your local area, or “long distance,” it is least expensive if you dial direct at night without using an operator. Calls from hotels often include a substantial service charge. All numbers in the United States can be dialed directly (i.e., without operator assistance), and overseas calls can also be dialed from many local exchanges. To ask an operator for assistance, dial “0.” He or she will be able to give you the area/ international code for the city/country you wish to call and place “collect” calls (which are billed to the person called) and “person-to-person” calls (which incur a charge only if the person you wish to speak to is present, even if the phone is answered). It is also useful to remember that you can save about 35 percent of the cost if you dial domestic long-distance calls after 5 p.m. and 60 percent if you call between 11 p.m. and 8 a.m. on weekdays, all day on Saturday, and before 5 p.m. on Sundays or holidays. (This may vary, however, according to the long-distance provider you choose.) Some businesses in the United States have “800” or “888” as an area code; such numbers can be dialed (preceded by “1”) without charge to the caller from anywhere in the United States. You can obtain a local number by calling “Information” (dial “411”) and a long-distance number by dialing the area code followed by 555- 12 12. The services usually carry a small charge. Telephone calls to numbers with “900” area codes cost more than normal long-distance calls—sometimes as much as $50 for a 1-minute call! By dialing 900 numbers, you can order products, get financial tips, talk with a willing stranger, and much more. Although some legitimate services are provided through 900 numbers, it is vital to be aware that ALL of them cost money. Some companies are starting to send bills for calls placed to 800 numbers, as well. In case of emergency, call the operator (dial “0”), and ask for the police, fire department, or an ambulance. In many cities, there is a special number (usually “911”) to use in the event of an emergency. It can be dialed from a pay phone without the use of coins. Public coin-operated telephones can be found on the street and in railroad and bus stations, airports, hotels, restaurants, drugstores, and other public buildings. Prepaid telephone debit cards are available almost everywhere in the United States. With them, you may place local, long-distance, and international calls from any location without the necessity of coins for a pay phone or a long-distance account with a U.S. telephone company. You may purchase these cards in $5 and $10
    • 68 Appendix Four—Communication increments at convenience stores, supermarkets, drug stores and post offices or through your local telephone company. NOTE: These debit cards often offer the most economical rates for calling overseas and you avoid the various taxes and charges that will accompany your home phone calling plans. To have a telephone installed in your home, dial the telephone company’s business office (see a telephone directory). Ordinarily, service can be provided within a week. The company charges for initial installation of the line and a monthly fee for local service and rental of equipment (or you may purchase your own phone), with extra charges for long-distance calls. A deposit of approximately $50 will usually be required of new subscribers. Although there will be only one company providing local telephone service in a given area, you will be given information and asked to make a selection on a number of competing long-distance companies and their individual service options. If you have a long-distance account with a U.S. telephone company and plan to place international long-distance calls frequently, you may wish to enroll in your company’s international calling plan. These plans offer special discounts for international calls and can save you a lot of money. An inexpensive alternative to international calling plan is Skype. Set up an account on skype.com and get started! With Skype you can call other Skype users for free or call local and international phone numbers for a small fee. Skype is only accessible with an Internet connection and is a program available for download to your computer. Many public computers also have Skype access, which you can use to make phone calls in certain appropriate environments. Telephone Answering Machines and Voice Mail Telephone answering machines or voice mail are in frequent use in many U.S. homes and offices. Although this may seem impersonal at first, you will soon become accustomed to this practice and learn to leave comprehensive messages. Cellular/Mobile Telephones “Cell Phones” are very popular and you can find very competitive prices or package deals. There are also many styles of telephones at different prices that offer a variety of tools beyond cell phone use. Unlike in other countries, where prepaid cell phone cards are popular, in the U.S. you will need to purchase a service plan. Many systems in the U.S. require a 2- year service agreement to get the best price; however, terminating the contract early carries a high penalty that may actually make the contract more expensive. Service Agreements carry a number of minutes of services you agree to purchase per month. If you go over your agreed allotment you will be charged by the minute at a much higher rate. Be sure to purchase the amount of minutes that will serve your usage needs. You will need to read the contract carefully and sign only for services that you will need. Internet Access You may choose to have a computer at home and will need to have access to the Internet. Most university dormitory housing will have access to the Internet. If you are in a private residence, most telephone companies offer some form of DSL (Digital Subscriber Line) access for an increased price to your telephone bill. You may also purchase a high speed online connection through your television cable company. If high speed Internet connections are beyond your price range, most Internet service providers (ISPs) still offer traditional dial-up connections for lower prices. There is a large variety of Internet providers available and you should shop around first before deciding. Fax and E-mail Americans frequently communicate with others by facsimile (fax) machine or electronic mail (e-mail). It is becoming increasingly more popular to seek out information and communicate with others by computer. E-mail allows you to correspond with anyone in the world with an Internet account. The World Wide Web, newsgroups, and online forums allow you to obtain news and specialized information. Ask your host institution about acquiring and using an Internet account. Sending information by fax is a common way to conduct business because it is quick and costs the same as a
    • 69 telephone call. Fax machines are available in most college and university departments. Some stores also provide fax services for a modest fee. THE MEDIA (NEWSPAPERS, RADIO, TELEVISION) The press in the United States is independent and free of governmental control. The editorial policy of each TV or radio station or newspaper is determined by its owners. Most are supported financially by advertisers, although there are “public” TV and radio stations that broadcast no commercials and are supported by contributions from individuals, foundations, and corporations. Public TV usually features more educational and cultural programs than the commercial stations. Local newspapers, daily and weekly, abound, but it is also possible to purchase or subscribe to daily papers of regional or national stature. Among the latter, The New York Times is best known for general news coverage; The Wall Street Journal, for financial and business news. There are four nationwide TV/radio networks (NBC, CBS, ABC, and Fox), each with affiliated local stations that carry almost all the networks’ programs. These are in addition to independent local commercial and public stations. In most areas, therefore, one can choose from among 6 to 10 stations. There is no fee for TV or radio usage unless one subscribes to a “cable service,” which offers such special programming as recent movies and CNN and requires the installation of special equipment. CNN and the public access stations in your area often broadcast news in a variety of foreign languages. They may provide more information about current events in your home country than is available in the local newspapers. Most national and local newspapers, radio and TV stations operate websites which feature news, weather, sports, blogs, etc. Appendix Four—Communication
    • Appendix Five—Transportation
    • 71 Appendix Five—Transportation LOCAL PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION Without question, the private automobile is the most widely used form of transportation in the United States. There is one car on the road for every two people. Americans jump into their cars for errands even a few blocks from home and view them as an important source of recreation. Because of the prevalence of automobiles, public transportation is less common in the United States than in many other parts of the world; in some rural areas of the United States, it is virtually nonexistent. Unless you can afford to purchase an automobile (see below), it is important to investigate the availability of transportation before you decide where to live. Cities are served by both public and private bus systems (some of the larger ones have subways, as well). Buses frequently require exact change unless the passenger holds a monthly or weekly pass purchased earlier, while subways are entered with tickets or tokens that can be purchased at the time of travel. It is convenient to purchase a supply to avoid waiting in line each time you travel. There is less need for a private car in these areas unless you intend to travel outside the city with some frequency. Indeed, they can often be more trouble than they are worth, given the scarcity of parking spaces in urban environments. AUTOMOBILES Driver’s License Only tourists may use the driver’s licenses of their own country for up to one year; international students are expected to apply for a license in the state in which they reside. You may not be issued automobile insurance if you do not have a valid United States driver’s license. To obtain a license, visit the local office of the Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV). If you have a valid license from home, the driving test required of new drivers will probably be waived, but you will be asked to take a written test proving you understand the road rules of the U.S. The DMV will give you a book outlining these rules. Car Rental There are many car rental agencies all over the country, and they can be found at all major airports. Cars can be rented by the day, week, month, or year; usually the fee is based on the duration of the rental and, in some cases, a mileage charge. Gasoline is sometimes included in the fee; sometimes it costs extra. You must present the agency with a valid driver’s license. Most agencies demand a credit card before they will rent a vehicle; those that accept cash usually ask for a substantial deposit and return any excess when the final bill is settled. Many car rental agencies require the purchase of insurance, and it is not uncommon for the rental to be refused or heavily surcharged for drivers younger than 25. Other Important Information Gasoline is sold by the gallon (slightly less than four liters) and is usually available in three unleaded grades, each designed for different-sized engines. (Environmental laws require cars in the U.S. to use unleaded gas.) Diesel fuel is also available, but less frequently. Gas stations (also called service stations) also provide restroom facilities as a convenience to the traveler. Driving laws are strictly enforced, and ignorance of them is not considered an excuse. Parking rules are clearly posted on the roadsides, and fines are imposed, or cars towed away, if they are not observed. Moving violations, such as passing in a no -passing zone, speeding, driving through a red light, are considered the most serious and carry the heaviest fines. Speed limits are also posted; the maximum speed limit permitted on highways varies by state and type of road. There are laws in the U.S. to prevent driving under the influence of alcohol, and penalties for doing so are severe. To protect yourself and your property, never pick up hitchhikers you do not know, never leave the keys in the ignition, never leave packages visible in the car, and be sure to close all windows and lock car doors whenever you park. When driving you
    • 72 should be aware that pedestrians always have the right of way. You should also note that making a right turn against a red light may be illegal in some urban areas. LONG-DISTANCE TRAVEL The United States is covered with a network of air routes, and service is frequent to most destinations. Because distances are great, and because of the value placed on time, Americans frequently choose air travel, despite its relatively high cost. You can easily obtain information on flights and costs by telephone or on the Internet and even reserve a seat that can be paid for when you arrive at the airport to board your flight. Most planes have both first-class and coach- or economy-seating areas. Special low-cost fares, known as “super savers,” are sometimes offered, although they may carry some restrictions as to the length of stay and the days of travel. The lowest fares usually must be purchased at least 7 to 21 days in advance and require that you stay over a Saturday night. Bus transportation from the airport to the city center is usually available and less expensive than taxis. Many suburban areas are served by commuter rail lines that reach 50 to 60 miles outside major cities. The use of trains for more extensive trips had declined until a decade or so ago, but the railroad is making a comeback to some extent. The passenger service is provided by AMTRAK, which runs trains across the country but to a limited number of cities. A few of the trains travel through particularly impressive scenery and are popular with tourists. Most trains offer two classes of service, first class and coach, and some provide sleeping accommodations. AMTRAK also offers a Euro rail-style pass especially for international travelers. A15- or 30-day USARail Pass is available for regional or nationwide travel. This pass is only available for non -U.S. and non-Canadian citizens. Rates are higher for summertime travel. USA Rail Passes may be purchased at any AMTRAK station. Be sure to bring your passport with you when you reserve the tickets. The AMTRAK telephone number is 1-800-872-7245 and their website address is www.amtrak.com. The least expensive mode of transportation is the bus, and those that provide long-distance service can be remarkably comfortable - with reclining seats, air conditioning, and rest rooms. Greyhound is the largest bus passenger service provider in the U.S. (www.greyhound.com). Airlines, train, and bus companies sell passes that permit extensive travel within a given time period well below the usual cost and permit those with limited funds to see a good deal of the country. The companies themselves (see the telephone directory) or travel agents can tell you current prices and conditions, but some of these passes must be purchased before you leave home. If you find yourself in an airport with any kind of problem, you should seek a representative of the Travelers’ Aid Society. This organization has desks in airports (and some railroad stations and bus terminals) across the country, operated by staff ready to assist with emergencies of all kinds, including illness, lost tickets, lack of funds, and language problems. Appendix Five—Transportation
    • Appendix Six—Miscellaneous
    • 74 Appendix Six—Miscellaneous TIME ZONES The continental United States is divided into four time zones, as shown on the map below. The relative times for the outlying states are also indicated. Eastern Standard Time is 5 hours earlier than Greenwich Mean Time. Most states observe daylight saving time during the summer months. This means that clocks are advanced 1 hour on a given date in April and restored to standard time in October. (They “spring forward” in the spring, “fall back” in the fall.) Exceptions to this rule are made in Arizona, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, American Samoa, and most of Indiana. Arrival and departure times of planes and trains are usually given in the current time of the arrival or departure point. HOURS OF BUSINESS Offices are usually open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, with employees taking an hour for lunch sometime between noon and 2 p.m. Banks are generally open to the public only until 4 p.m. and most have automatic teller machines that dispense cash from your account or accept deposits 24 hours per day. Shops open about 9:30 a.m. and remain open continuously until 5:30 or 6 p.m., often until 9 p.m. one evening per week. All are open Monday through Saturday. Most shops in suburbanmalls are open until 9 p.m., Monday through Saturday, andusually from noon to 5 p.m. on Sundays. Drugstores, supermarkets, and smaller food shops usually remain open until late in the evening and on Sundays. ELECTRICITY Electrical current in the United States is produced at 110 volts, 60 cycles. Appliances manufactured for other voltages can be
    • 75 operated only with a transformer. Even so equipped, appliances with clocks or timers will not function properly, nor will television sets not built for the U.S. color system (N.T.S.C.). CLIMATE Because of its size and geographical diversity, the climate in different parts of the United States varies widely. To a certain extent, Americans are insulated from weather extremes. Homes, offices, cars, and buses are routinely air conditioned in the warmer parts of the country, and central heating is the rule everywhere. Indoor temperatures are thus maintained at 20 –22 °C (68–72 °F). The Northeastern States or New England (Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and Vermont): Winters can be very cold and long with lots of snow, and the summers are warm. In the north, winters can be very severe. Fall and spring are usually cool and crisp. You will find cooling fog along the coasts during winter and summer. The Mid-Atlantic Region (Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, Virginia, and Washington DC): Summers tend to be hot and humid, and late afternoon or early evening thunderstorms are common. Winters, while milder and a little shorter than in New England, can still produce a lot of snow. Spring and fall are very pleasant with relatively low humidity. The Southeastern States (Florida, Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and West Virginia): The southeastern states have long, hot, and humid summers and warm winters. Summer time, with its high humidity, can bring frequent but short- lived thunderstorms. Along the Atlantic coast, the hurricane season lasts from July to October. Southern Florida has an almost tropical climate where freezing temperatures are uncommon. In the mountains of West Virginia, the winters are similar to those in New England. The Midwest (Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Ohio, and Wisconsin): This region occupies the Great Plains, a vast, flat expanse located in the center of the country. Winters in the northern section of this region can be severe with blizzards and much snow, while summers in the southern section can be quite hot with frequent heat waves and drought. The Southern Interior and Gulf States (Alabama, Arkansas, Oklahoma, Louisiana, Mississippi, Tennessee, and Texas): Summers are hot and frequently humid, especially along the Gulf of Mexico. Average winter temperatures rarely fall below freezing, but there are occasional cold spells. The Rocky Mountain Region (Arizona, Colorado, Southern Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah, and Wyoming): Because of the range of altitudes in this mountainous region, there is considerable variety in local temperature and precipitation. Winters are very cold in the mountains and bring heavy snowfalls. Large areas of Arizona, New Mexico, Utah, and Nevada are desert, where even winters can be extremely hot and dry. The Pacific Northwest (Northern Idaho, Oregon, and Washington): The region enjoys mild winters and moderately warm summers. The Pacific Ocean helps keep the weather mild and wet along the coast, with a number of rainy days. California: Southern California, including Los Angeles and San Diego, enjoys warm to very hot but dry summers, while the winters are mild and moderately rainy. Smog (fog and pollution) is a problem in Los Angeles. Northern California, including Berkeley and San Francisco, has a cooler, milder climate year round. San Francisco is known for its morning fog. Alaska: Alaska is the northwestern most state of the United States and borders northwest Canada. It has long, snowy, frigid winters and short, mild summers. Days during mid-winter will only have 3 to 4 hours of daylight, and in mid- summer, only 3 to 4 hours of darkness. Hawaii: A chain of tropical islands in the Pacific Ocean, Hawaii is situated approximately 6,900 miles from the west coast of the United States by airplane. The weather is low in humidity and comfortable year round. Source: Pearce, E.A., and Gordon Smith. World Weather Guide. Time Books/Random House, 1990. Appendix Six—Miscellaneous
    • 76 RELIGION Freedom of religion is guaranteed by the Constitution of the United State, which also mandates a separation of church and state. The practice of religion is considered a private matter and a person’s religious preference may not be asked by employers, school, clubs, etc. The United States is a country that accommodates a large number of different religions and belief systems. It is often cited as the most openly religious country among the industrialized nations, with less than 10% of Americans selecting “None” as their religion in the 2000 U.S. population census. A large majority of Americans identify themselves as Christian (55% Protestant, 28% Catholic). Over 6 million Americans (2.3% of the population) identify themselves as Jewish, with the largest populations residing in New York, California and Florida. The U.S. is also home to a growing number of Muslims (2% of the population) both due to the growing Arab and African immigrant populations (which grew 38% in the 1 990s) and a growing number of converts to Islam, especially in the African American community. Some Muslim organizations put the number of converts to Islam as high 135,000 per year. One of the most important ongoing debates for Americans is the role of religion in public life. While the separation of church and state is a cornerstone of U.S. government structure, it has been an issue for discussion among Americans as far back as Thomas Jefferson. The debate continues today and is prominent both in national and local politics. Some of the more controversial issues involving religion today include prayer in public schools and the role of public funding in religious social services (e.g. homeless shelters, drug rehabilitation centers). As American religious diversity grows, this debate promises to become even more interesting and should continue to play an important role in American discourse. In large cities, even relatively obscure branches of the main religions have established their own churches, mosques, synagogues, or temples. A list of such groups can be found in the yellow pages of the telephone directory, and many of these organizations also place notices in weekend newspapers announcing the hours of religious services. You will always be welcome to attend the services without invitation, and you may also wish to take part in the social activities many such groups sponsor. LEISURE Whatever your leisure interests, you will find a great many pursuits to choose from. Those who prefer the spectator’s role will find that university towns abound in concerts, plays, sporting events, ethnic festivals, and, of course, movies, the favored entertainment of young Americans. There are also small museums all over the country, with a number of distinguished institutions in the major cities that house outstanding collections of fine and applied art or objects of historical or scientific interest. Local newspapers (also the campus paper) regularly list upcoming events. City hotels distribute free booklets to visitors listing current cultural events as well as nearby points of interest with their hours of operation. If you prefer a more active role, you will find it easy to join groups that make music, produce plays, or organize baseball, soccer, or basketball games. There are golf courses, tennis courts, swimming pools, skating rinks, and bowling alleys open to the public for a modest fee. Again, colleagues and neighbors will often be glad to point you in the right direction. SAFETY Many visitors to the United States are concerned about public order and safety, and it is true that certain precautions should be taken, especially in urban areas. It is best to ask a colleague for advice about which areas are safe if you will be residing in a large city, but a few general rules should be observed at all times:  Do not leave a room, house, or car with doors or windows unlocked;  Do not carry valuables or large sums of cash with you; do not frequent parks or deserted public places after dark; Appendix Six—Miscellaneous
    • 77  Do not attempt to arm yourself;  Do not resist a robber or mugger;  Do not pick up hitchhikers;  Avoid using bank automatic teller machines (ATMs) alone after dark. Be aware that many university security departments offer escort services for students and faculty during the evening hours. These suggestions are not made to frighten you, for it is very unlikely that you will experience any problems. You can be most certain of avoiding difficulties, however, if you follow these simple rules of safety. MAP OF THE U.S. Appendix Six—Miscellaneous
    • Appendix Seven—Glossary
    • 79 Appendix Seven—Glossary A.A.: Associate of Arts degree, awarded upon completion of a two-year, liberal arts program, generally with emphasis on the humanities or social sciences. A.A.S.: Associate of Applied Science degree, awarded upon completion of a two-year program, generally in a commercial or technical field of study. A.B.D.: “All but Degree” or “All but Dissertation,” an informal title for someone who has completed all Ph.D. requirements except the dissertation. Accreditation: Education in the United States is not controlled by a national ministry. An educational institution as a whole or one of its academic programs is certified as meeting the standards set by a particular association. Colleges and universities may be accredited by six regional and/or 40 professional accrediting bodies. Examples: Middle States Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools, American Medical Association. Add/Drop Form: Form used to change courses after registration. Alumni: People who have attended or graduated from a school, college or university (male: alumnus; female: alumna). Often alum is used as a catch-all term. Assignment: Work required by a professor to be completed outside of class and due by a specific date; also called homework. Audit: Attending a course with permission of the professor, but not for credit. B.A.: Bachelor of Arts (or baccalaureate) degree, awarded upon completion of a four-year (occasionally five) program of study, generally with emphasis on the humanities or social sciences. B.S.: Bachelor of Science (or baccalaureate) degree, awarded upon completion of a four-year (occasionally five) program of study, generally with emphasis on the natural or applied sciences. Board of Trustees: The governing body of a university, composed of prominent citizens; occasionally known as the Board of Regents. Campus: The college/university grounds, usually characterized by park-like green spaces. Card Catalogue: Traditionally, a collection of index cards in the library listing books by author, title and subject. Access to collections in most major libraries is now through computerized databases. Carrel: A small enclosed desk in the library reserved by students and faculty doing research. Certificate: A form of recognition for successfully completing a specified program of study, generally one or two years in length. Chairperson: A professor who administers an academic department; also referred to as the Department Head. Chancellor: Chief executive officer of an institution of higher education; also called the President. College: Institution that offers undergraduate, bachelor’s degree programs in liberal arts and sciences as well as first professional degrees; may be an independent college or part of a university; also a generic term referring to all
    • 80 education at the postsecondary level. Consortium: When there are several colleges and universities within close proximity to one another, they often join in a consortium to share library resources and often courses and other cultural and educational opportunities with one another’s students. Continuing Education: An extension of study at the higher education level for post-high school or college students, usually those beyond traditional university age. Co-op: A store originally organized and operated by students with the cooperation and approval of the school to sell books, school supplies, computers, clothing and other items useful to students. On many campuses, co-ops have developed into small department stores. Sometimes there are also food co-ops, which are student-operated supermarkets. Co-op can also refer to an apartment that is for sale instead of rent. Cooperative Education: Substantial practical work experience related to the student’s major field. It can be an educational plan that requires the student to alternate periods of full-time study with periods of full-time work, usually related to the major field. Core Curriculum: A group of courses in varied subject areas, designated by a college as part of the requirements for a specified degree; same as Required Course. Credit: The quantitative measurement assigned to a course; the recognition given for successful completion of course work; usually defined by the number of hours spent in class per week; one credit hour is usually assigned for 50 minutes of class per week over a period of a semester, quarter, or trimester. Dean: Senior academic officer of a college. A university may have several colleges, each headed by a dean. Dean’s List: List of undergraduate students who have earned above a certain grade point average for a given term. Discipline: A field of study, e.g., the discipline of chemistry. Dissertation: A formal, book-length monograph presenting the results of original study and research that is submitted to fulfill the requirements for a doctoral degree. Distance Learning: Education in which students take academic courses by accessing information and communicating with the instructor, sometimes asynchronously, over a computer network. Endowed Chair or Professorship: A specially funded and named faculty position for a distinguished professor who is said to hold the “Chair.” English as a Second Language (ESL): English language training for persons whose first language is not English. Entry Visa: Your entry visa is issued by a United States Consulate abroad and placed into your passport. The only purpose of an entry visa is to apply for admission to the United States at the port of entry. The entry visa itself may expire while you are in the U.S., but your permission to stay in the U.S. remains valid until the date on your DS-2019. Your visa specifies the type of immigration status you will hold (i.e., J-1, etc.), the date until which you may enter the U.S., and the number of entries you may make before you must apply for a new entry visa stamp. Evening College (or Night School): A division of a college, designed largely for adults, to offer college studies on a part- Appendix Seven—Glossary
    • 81 time basis. Exam: Major test given during the semester. Faculty: Teaching staff of a college or university. Normally used to refer to a person or people rather than an organizational unit within a university. Finals: Examinations at the end of a semester on all the materials covered. Full-time Student: A student who is carrying a normal load of courses. Undergraduate students must take at least 12 credit hours per term and graduate students 9 credit hours at most colleges and universities to be considered full-time. General Education: Courses covering broad areas of the liberal arts. GPA: Grade point average, maximum of 4.0 (Also, see the section Grading, American Style). Graduate: Description of a post-undergraduate program leading to a master’s or doctoral degree; also describes a student in such a program (“graduate student”) as well as a person who has satisfactorily completed any educational program (“graduate”). Honor Fraternity: Organization honoring students who have achieved distinction in academic areas or service. IIE ID Number: IIE ID number is a unique 8-digit number assigned to each individual participating in an IIE-sponsored or administered program. You can find your IIE ID on your Terms of Appointment. Incomplete: A temporary mark given to a student who is doing passing work in a course but cannot complete all the requirements during the semester. Independent Study: A method of receiving credit for study or research independent of any specific course. Such study is often part of an honors program in the student’s major and is supervised by a specified professor to whom the student is accountable. Junior College: A two-year institution of higher education offering liberal arts, sciences, technical and vocational training; may be under either public or private control; awards an A.A. or A.S. degree after two years or a certificate after a shorter course of study. Liberal Arts College: A college that emphasizes a program of liberal arts or general undergraduate studies. M.A./M.S.: Master of Arts/Master of Science degree, awarded upon completion of a one to two year program of graduate study. Major: Area of concentration or study. Mid-term: A test in the middle of your term. Minor: Area of study with less study or concentration. N Number: An N number is a unique SEVIS identification (ID) number on the upper right hand side of your Form DS- 2019, directly above the barcode. SEVIS ID numbers are an N followed by 9 digits. Appendix Seven—Glossary
    • 82 Open Admission: College or university admissions policy of admitting high school graduates and other adults generally without regard to conventional academic qualifications, such as high school subjects, grades and test scores. Virtually all applicants are accepted. Pass-Fail Grading System: The practice at some colleges of rating students’ quality of performance in their courses as either passing or failing instead of giving grades to indicate various levels of achievement. Ph.D.: Doctor of Philosophy; highest academic degree in U.S. education; diploma states Doctor of Philosophy in (subject); generally research oriented. Postdoctoral Fellow: A person recently awarded a Ph.D. appointment to assist the university in its research and teaching functions. Pre-registration: A form (online) filled out prior to the beginning of a semester to ensure course selections. Prerequisite: A requirement that must be fulfilled before permission is given for enrollment in a particular course. Professional School: Institutions that specialize in the study of business, medicine, dentistry, law, engineering, music, art or theology; offer two to seven years of training; may be independent or part of university. Professor Emeritus: An academic title generally awarded to retired faculty. Professor: The title for all university faculty members, who are ranked as assistant, associate or (full) professors. Provost: The chief academic officer of the university, who supervises academic policies and budgets. Quiz: minor test given during the semester. Reading List: A list of books and articles prepared by each professor for a specific course. Required and suggested texts are usually indicated as such. This list is designed to give the student an overview of the particular course. Recitation/Office Hours/Tutoring: Sessions headed by a teacher’s assistant (outside of class) who provides extra help where students can discuss and ask questions about the materials presented in the lecture or reading assignments. Reference Room: Room in the library with reference books, such as dictionaries and encyclopedias. Registrar: Official recorder of students’ academic information, such as courses taken and grades received. Research Assistant (R.A.): Usually an advanced graduate student who assists a professor on a research project. R.A.s may receive payment for their services in addition to a waiver of tuition charges. Reserve: When a book is “on reserve,” it means that the book cannot be removed from the library. This is done when the library has a limited number of copies of a book that is required reading for a particular course. Sabbatical: A leave of absence granted to a faculty member, usually at the end of six years of teaching at one university. Semester: One academic term is half of the academic year. Haverford has two semesters: "fall" and "spring." Seminar: A course of study in which the class meets and decides what and how they would like to pursue their study; Appendix Seven—Glossary
    • 83 the class decides who will do what research; ideas and research are presented by the class members, and the professor serves as a moderator. Skim: To read something quickly to get a general idea of its contents. Summer School: Formal, but reduced, course offerings during the long academic vacation. Syllabus: An outline of topics to be covered in an academic course. Teaching Assistant (T.A.): Usually an advanced graduate student who assists a professor teaching large undergraduate classes. T.A.s may receive payment for their services in addition to a waiver of tuition charges. Technical Institute: Institution offering terminal training in applied sciences and technical subjects of two to three years duration (no further degree training). Tenure: The status of a permanent member of the faculty, awarded on the basis of scholarship, teaching or year of service. Thesis: A formal paper presenting the results of study and research that is submitted to fulfill requirements for an advanced degree; usually refers to the Master’s thesis. Transcript: Official copy of a student’s academic record at a particular academic institution, including dates attended, courses taken, grades, grade point average, degree(s) earned and academic honors. Trimester: Usually 15 weeks, including the final examination period; there are three trimesters (September- September) per calendar year, with students generally attending class during two of the three. Undergraduate: Description of a college or university program leading to a bachelor’s degree; also a student in the first four years of college or university study. University: An institution composed of colleges or schools of liberal arts, sciences and technology, as well as professional and graduate schools; offers bachelor’s degree programs and technical and professional graduate training. Appendix Seven—Glossary
    • Appendix Eight—Brazilian Consulate Information
    • 85 Appendix Eight—Brazilian Consulate Information Atlanta Consulate General of Brazil in Atlanta, GA Jurisdiction: Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi, South Carolina and Tennessee. Responsible for Csf: Elaine Boing Telephone: (404) 949-1213 E-mail: csf.atlanta@itamaraty.gov.br Website: http://atlanta.itamaraty.gov.br/ Boston Consulate General of Brazil in Boston, MA Jurisdiction: Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island and Vermont. Responsible for Csf: Cristina Caldas Telephone: (857) 321-7298 E-mail: csf.boston@itamaraty.gov.br Website: http://boston.itamaraty.gov.br/pt-br/ciencia_sem_fronteiras.xml Chicago Consulate General of Brazil in Chicago, IL Jurisdiction: Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota and Wisconsin. Responsible for Csf: David Saide Telephone: (313) 464-0244 x5018 E-mail: csf.chicago@itamaraty.gov.br Website: http://chicago.itamaraty.gov.br/en-us/ Houston Consulate General of Brazil in Houston, TX Jurisdiction: Arkansas, Colorado, Kansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas. Responsible for Csf: Adriana Chiaramonti E-mail: csf.houston@itamaraty.gov.br Website: http://houston.itamaraty.gov.br/pt-br/ Los Angeles Consulate General of Brazil in Los Angeles, CA Jurisdiction: Arizona, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Utah, Wyoming, California (the counties of Imperial, Kern, Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, San Diego, San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara and Ventura) as well as the following U.S. islands in the Pacific: Johnston, Midway, Wake, Howland, Baker and Jarvis. Responsible for Csf: Marcos Carvalho Tel: (323) 651-2664 Ext 219 E-mail: csf.losangeles@itamaraty.gov.br Website: http://losangeles.itamaraty.gov.br/pt-br/
    • 86 Appendix Eight—Brazilian Consulate Information Miami Consulate General of Brazil in Miami, FL Jurisdiction: Florida, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Responsible for Csf: Cônsul-Adjunta Nássara Thomé and Assistente Técnica Adela Tiscareño E-mail: csf.miami@itamaraty.gov.br Website: http://miami.itamaraty.gov.br/ New York Consulate General of Brazil in New York, NY Jurisdiction: New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Connecticut, Rhode Island, and Bermuda Islands. Responsible for Csf: Frederico Menino Tel: (917) 777-7637 E-mail: csf.novayork@itamaraty.gov.br Website: http://novayork.itamaraty.gov.br/pt-br/ San Francisco Consulate General of Brazil in San Francisco, CA Jurisdiction: Alaska, Oregon, Washington, California (the counties not included in the jurisdiction of Los Angeles). Responsible for Csf: Marcio Vecchi Tel: (415) 820-5281 E-mail: marciovecchi@brazilsf.org Website: http://saofrancisco.itamaraty.gov.br/pt-br/ Washington Embassy of Brazil in Washington, DC Jurisdiction: District of Columbia, Delaware, Kentucky, Maryland, North Carolina, Ohio, Virginia and West Virginia. Responsible for Csf: Maricy Shmitz Tel: (202) 238-2708 E-mail: csf.washington@itamaraty.gov.br and education@brasilemb.org Website: http://washington.itamaraty.gov.br/en-us/
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