Periodontist NYC Study: Number of Teeth as a Predictor of Cardiovascular Mortality in a                    Cohort of 7,674...
periodontist NYC statistical analysis revealed a seven-fold increased risk for mortality fromcoronary heart disease in sub...
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Periodontist NYC Study: Number of Teeth as a Predictor of Cardiovascular Mortality in a Cohort of 7,674 Subjects Followed for 12 years

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The link between the number of teeth (as an indicator of oral health) and the incidents of cardiovascular-related deaths is investigated in a study sample of 7,674 males and females.

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Periodontist NYC Study: Number of Teeth as a Predictor of Cardiovascular Mortality in a Cohort of 7,674 Subjects Followed for 12 years

  1. 1. Periodontist NYC Study: Number of Teeth as a Predictor of Cardiovascular Mortality in a Cohort of 7,674 Subjects Followed for 12 yearsThe link between the number of teeth (as an indicator of oral health) and the incidents ofcardiovascular-related deaths is investigated in a study sample of 7,674 males and females.Periodontist NYC Study: Comparing Oral Health with Cardiovascular MortalityThe relationship between oral health and the development of different cardiovascular disorders,such as cardiovascular disease, coronary heart disease and congestive heart failure is evident in agreat number of reported cases and periodontist NYC studies. In fact, poor oral health is reportedto account for greater cardiovascular-related deaths than hypertension, smoking, cholesterol, ageand gender. This particular periodontist NYC study investigates if different parameters of oralhealth, as reflected by the number of healthy remaining teeth, are associated with future mortalityin different cardiovascular disorders in a dose-dependent manner.Periodontist NYC Study: MethodologyFor the purpose of this research, a total of 7,674 subjects, ages ranging between 20 and 89 years,were recruited consisting of: ● 3,300 males and ● 4,374 femalesThe subjects received a dental examination by periodontist NYC specialists between the sampleyears of 1976 and 2002 (a total of 26 years). The following variables were evaluated in relationto cause of death: ● The number of remaining teeth, ● The severity of periodontal disease, ● The number of deepened periodontal pockets, and ● The extent of bleeding on probing.Periodontist NYC Study: Research FindingsDuring a median follow-up period of 12 years by a periodontist NYC, of the 7674 subjectsinvolved in the study, 629 died and the following observations made: ● In 47.5% (299) of the subjects, the cause of mortality was cardiovascular disease (CVD) ● In 26.6% (167) of the subjects, the cause of mortality was coronary heart disease (CHD); ● In 13.2% (83) of the subjects, the cause of mortality was stroke; and ● In 7.8% (49) of the subjects, the cause of mortality was aortic aneurysm or congestive heart failure.So, in review, the causes of death for 330 subjects (of the 629 that died) were other thancardiovascular disease. After adjustment for age, gender and smoking, the number of remainingteeth was seen to predict, in a dose-dependent manner, all-cause mortality and mortality incardiovascular disease and in coronary heart disease, but not mortality from stroke. Appropriate
  2. 2. periodontist NYC statistical analysis revealed a seven-fold increased risk for mortality fromcoronary heart disease in subjects with <10 teeth compared to those with >25 teeth. The severityof periodontal disease, number of deepened periodontal pockets and bleeding on probing werenot related to mortality in a dose-dependent manner after adjustment for confounders.Periodontist NYC: Research ConclusionsThis fairly large, prospective study with a long follow-up period presents for the first time adose-dependent relationship between number of teeth and both all-cause and cardiovasculardisease mortality. The significant findings of this periodontist NYC study indicate a clear linkbetween oral health and cardiovascular disease, and that the number of teeth is a proper indicatorfor oral health in this respect.Research conducted by Holmlund A, Holm G, Lind LPublished: J Periodontol. 2010 Jun;81(6):870-6.

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