Students on Board (With Notes)
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Students on Board (With Notes)

on

  • 1,095 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,095
Views on SlideShare
593
Embed Views
502

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

2 Embeds 502

http://www.data-first.org 501
http://translate.googleusercontent.com 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Students on Board (With Notes) Students on Board (With Notes) Document Transcript

  • Successful schools make students feel welcome, academically engaged and supported by the adults in the building. Considering the school climate of your schools is as important as examining student scores and graduation rates because a healthy environment can have a tremendous impact on student achievement. This presentation reviews the research on the relationship between school climate and student learning,  and gives an overview of what students nationally think and say about the climate of their schools.  1
  • 2
  • Failing students often feel left out of the school culture, and students who are disengaged don’t often produce academically. It’s a chicken or egg situation, and varies from one student to the next. What we know is that students who exhibit these early warning signs are in danger of eventually dropping out. Successful interventions attend to both their academic and social needs to put them back on track. 3
  • While this list is not inclusive, these indicators represent a good jumping off point for considering school climate. The slides that follow show data for each of these indicators and how it relates to a safe and productive learning environment and high student achievement. 4
  • Attendance is key to student achievement and it’s not just student attendance. High absenteeism among teachers can also have a negative impact on school climate and performance. 5
  • Missing 3 or more days monthly is a high rate of absenteeism, and can translate into academic failure and social disengagement. Reading this graph: 20% of all middle school students reported missing 3 or more days the previous month.   6
  • Feeling unsafe or bullied in or on the way to school prompts many students to miss school. Reading this graph: 5% of students aged 12‐17 reported missing school the previous month because they did not feel safe.  7
  • 8
  • Since the 1990s, US schools have seen a sizable decline in violent crimes committed on their campuses. Nonetheless 5% of all students still do not feel safe in or on the way to school. Students of color are more likely to feel afraid than their white peers. 9
  • 10
  • Even verbal bullying can have a negative impact on student performance. 11
  • Lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender youth report being bullied more than other students. Reading this graph: 30% of secondary LGBT students said they missed school because they did not feel safe compared to 6.7% of the general population of secondary students.  12
  • 13
  • Discipline problems also contribute to a poor school climate. While schools have a responsibility to protect students from disruptive or dangerous peers, it’s important to understand that students who are being disciplined through out‐of‐school suspensions suffer academically, too, and often end up in the juvenile justice system. 14
  • Out‐of‐school suspensions and expulsions can also have a negative impact on school wide performance. Researchers Rausch and Skiba compared demographically similar schools and found that some schools are able to keep suspensions down and produce higher student outcomes as a result. The effective practices included community partnerships and strong school leadership.  15
  • Black students are more likely than other racial/ethnic groups to receive out‐of‐school suspensions.  16
  • Texas researchers found that nine out of ten students who are referred for disciplinary action for the first time are referred for a “code of conduct” violation,  which is discretionary and not mandated by state standards. This is true for all races. However, black students are more likely to be given an out‐of‐school suspension than their white and Hispanic peers for their first offense.  17
  • 18
  • 19
  • 20
  • NSBA encourages school boards to hold conversations with students to begin to understand the climate in their district schools. Guidelines for holding these conversations can be found in the “Students on Board” brochure. Here is a sample of some key questions to get the conversation going.   21
  • Get students’ ideas about how school boards could improve school climate. 22
  • Don’t let the effort stop with the conversation. There are things that school boards can do to improve the climate in their district.  23
  • 24