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Cengage Learning Webinar, Course Redesign, Improving Outcomes and Reducing Costs: The Case for Redesign
 

Cengage Learning Webinar, Course Redesign, Improving Outcomes and Reducing Costs: The Case for Redesign

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The growing emphasis on student achievement – in combination with increased budget pressures – have led many institutions to seek proven ways to simultaneously accomplish two goals: improve ...

The growing emphasis on student achievement – in combination with increased budget pressures – have led many institutions to seek proven ways to simultaneously accomplish two goals: improve student outcomes and reduce institutional costs. During this April 24, 2013 webinar, Dr. Carolyn Jarmon, Vice President of the National Center for Academic Transformation, provided an overview of the success that more than 200 institutions have had in achieving both of these goals. She discussed the principles, models and results that have characterized these success stories, providing examples from recent case studies.

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  • For those of you who would like to learn more about the course redesign process, we will be hosting a follow-up webinar on May 7th titled “Assessing Learning and Cost in Course Redesign.” Building on the overview of the course redesign movement provided today, Carolyn will describe the methods institutions have used to measure the impact of course redesign on student learning and instructional costs. She will provide specific examples from institutions that have used these methods to prove their success. She will also share the tools that these institutions used to demonstrate increased learning and reduced costs, so that other institutions seeking to validate their success with course redesign are equipped to do so.
  • For those of you who would like to learn more about the course redesign process, we will be hosting a follow-up webinar on May 7th titled “Assessing Learning and Cost in Course Redesign.” Building on the overview of the course redesign movement provided today, Carolyn will describe the methods institutions have used to measure the impact of course redesign on student learning and instructional costs. She will provide specific examples from institutions that have used these methods to prove their success. She will also share the tools that these institutions used to demonstrate increased learning and reduced costs, so that other institutions seeking to validate their success with course redesign are equipped to do so.

Cengage Learning Webinar, Course Redesign, Improving Outcomes and Reducing Costs: The Case for Redesign Cengage Learning Webinar, Course Redesign, Improving Outcomes and Reducing Costs: The Case for Redesign Presentation Transcript

  • Improving Outcomes and Reducing Costs:The Case for Redesignwith Dr. Carolyn Jarmon, Vice President forThe National Center for Academic Transformation
  • REDESIGNING STUDENTLEARNING ENVIRONMENTS
  • • Established in 1999 as a university Center atRPI funded by the Pew Charitable Trusts• Became an independent non-profitorganization in 2003• Mission: help colleges and universities learnhow to use technology to improve studentlearning outcomes and reduce theirinstructional costs
  • TRADITIONAL INSTRUCTIONSeminarsLectures
  • “BOLT-ON” INSTRUCTION
  • WHAT’S WRONGWITH THE LECTURE?• Treats all students as if they are thesame• Ineffective in engaging students• Inadequate individual assistance• Poor attendance and success rates• Students fail to retain learning
  • WHAT’S WRONG WITH MULTIPLESECTIONS?• In theory: greater interaction• In practice: large class size• In practice: dominated by thesame presentation techniques• Lack of coordination• Inconsistent outcomes
  • WHAT DOES NCAT MEAN BYCOURSE REDESIGN?Course redesign is the process of redesigningwhole courses (rather than individual classes orsections) to achieve better learning outcomesat a lower cost by taking advantage of thecapabilities of information technology.
  • PROGRAM INCOURSE REDESIGNTo encourage colleges anduniversities to redesign theirapproaches to instructionusing technology to achievecost savings as well asquality enhancements.50,000students30 projects
  • SUMMARY OF RESULTS• 25 of the original 30 showedimprovement; 5 showed equallearning• 24 measured retention; 18 showedimprovement• All 30 showed cost reduction• Results in subsequent national andstate and system programs havecontinued to show comparable results
  • WHY REDESIGN?Look for courses where redesign will have a high impact –let’s make a difference:• High withdrawal/failure rates• Students on waiting lists• Students turned away – graduation bottleneck• Over enrollment of courses leading to multiplemajors• Inconsistency of preparation• Difficulty getting qualified adjuncts• Difficulty in subsequent courses
  • TEAM EFFORT IS KEYEach team included– Administrator– Faculty experts– Technology expertise– Assessment assistance
  • NCAT METHODOLOGY:Relevance and Utility• Discipline: math & literature• Age: traditional & workingadults• Institution: small & large• Location: on-campus & at adistance• Redesign: current & newcourses• Level: introductory &advanced
  • TAKING COURSE REDESIGN TOSCALE• The Roadmap to Redesign (R2R)2003 – 2006 (20 institutions)• Colleagues Committed to Redesign(C2R)2006 - 2009 (60 institutions)• Programs with Systems and States2006 – present (~80 institutions)• The Redesign Alliance2006 – present (70+ institutions)• Changing the Equation2009 – 2012 (38 institutions)
  • ~300 REDESIGNED COURSES• ~200,000 students annually• Improved student learning: 72% Equivalentstudent learning: 28%• Cost reduction: 37% (9% to 77%)• Other outcomes– Increased course-completion rates– Improved retention– Better student attitudes toward the subject– Increased student satisfaction with the mode ofinstruction
  • QUANTITATIVE• Mathematics– Developmental Math– Pre-calculus Math– College Algebra– Discrete Math– Introductory Algebra– Elementary Algebra– Beginning Algebra– Intermediate Algebra– Linear Algebra• Statistics– Business Statistics– Introductory Statistics– Elementary Statistics– Economic Statistics• Computing– Computer Programming– Information TechnologyConcepts– Computer Literacy– Information Literacy– Tools for the InformationAge
  • • SCIENCE– Anatomy andPhysiology– Astronomy– Biology– Ethnobotany– Chemistry– Geology• SOCIAL SCIENCE– AmericanGovernment– Macro andMicroeconomics– Psychology– Sociology– Urban Affairs
  • • HUMANITIES– Developmental Reading– Developmental Writing– English Composition– Communication Studies– Understanding the Visualand Performing Arts– History of WesternCivilization– Great Ideas in WesternMusic– Spanish– World Literature– British Literature– Women and Gender Studies• PROFESSIONAL– Elementary Education– Education: The Curriculum– Engineering Technology– Organizational Behavior– Public Speaking– Accounting– Nursing
  • WHAT DO THE FACULTY SAY?• “It’s the best experienceI’ve ever had in aclassroom.”• “The quality of myworklife has changedimmeasurably for thebetter.”• “It’s a lot of work duringthe transition--but it’sworth it.”
  • REDESIGN MODELS• Supplemental – Add to the current structure and/orchange the content• Replacement – Blend face-to-face with onlineactivities• Emporium – Move all classes to a lab settingFully online – Conduct all (most)learning activities online• Buffet – Mix and match accordingto student preferences• Linked Workshop – JIT workshopslinked to college level course
  • REDESIGN CHARACTERISTICS• Redesign the whole course—not just a singleclass• Emphasize active learning—greater studentengagement with the material and with oneanother• Rely heavily on readily available interactivesoftware—used independently and in teams• Mastery learning—not self-paced• Increase on-demand, individualizedassistance• Automate only those course components thatcan benefit from automation—e.g., homework, quizzes, exams• Replace single mode instruction withdifferentiated personnel strategiesTechnology enables good pedagogy with large #s of students.
  • BIOLOGYUniversity of MassachusettsCHALLENGES• Inconsistent student preparation• Poor class attendance• Lectures that repeated the contents ofthe textbook• High dissatisfaction with course by bothfaculty and students
  • BIOLOGYUniversity of Massachusetts• Continue to have large class meetings• Require short pre-tests before the start of thefirst class each week and these are availablefor the entire term as review• Receive small number of points for taking theonline quiz• Provide 24/7 online study materials• Include small group interactions during classfocused on applied biology problems• Class periods are now used to discuss biologyproblems, rather than lecture
  • BIOLOGYUniversity of MassachusettsStudent Outcomes• In spite of more difficult questions, scores onexams in the redesigned course averaged 73% vs.61% in the traditional course.• 23% of the exam questions in the traditionalmodel required reasoning or problem solvingskills vs. 67% in the redesigned course.• Attendance averaged 89.9% in the redesignedcourse vs. 67% in the traditional course.
  • INTRODUCTORY SPANISHUniversity of AlabamaTraditional Courses• 3 5-credit-hour courses• All face-to-face class meetingswith instructor• Taught primarily by GTAs• Paper textbook• Increasing demand with no wayto accommodate morestudentsRedesigned Courses• 3 5-credit-hour courses• Reduce 1 face-to-face classmeeting with instructor• Online: quizzes, vocabulary &grammar exercises – automaticallygraded• 33% enrollment increase• GTAs teach 4 sections instead of 3per year for same timecommitment
  • INTRODUCTORY SPANISHUniversity of AlabamaOUTCOMES• Traditional sections had an average final examscore of 65.5% in Spanish I.• Immediately after the initial redesign in 2005,there was no difference, although costs werereduced by 25%.• In spring 2009, the final exam score average inthe fully redesigned course was 80%,demonstrating both sustainability and continuedimprovement.• Cost reduction of $245 to $183 per student
  • GENERAL PSYCHOLOGYFrostburg State UniversityCHANGES• Reduced meetings from 2 to 1• Required computer lab time• Increased section size from 50to 150• Use active learning, onlinematerials such as masteryquizzes, discussions, groupassignments, self-assessments• DWF rate– Year prior to redesign 18%– Full Implementation 13%• Cost Reduction: $90 to $25per student• Now teach more upperdivision courses
  • ENGLISH COMPOSITIONTallahassee Community College• Primary goals– Increase writing skills– Improve student success (<60%)– Increase consistency (100 sections)• Replace classroom time with lab time andonline activities• Integrate reading and writing, provideimmediate feedback and support collaborativelearning• Success rates Increased to 68.4%• Final essay scores increased (8.35 in redesignvs. 7.32 in traditional)• Cost-per-student declined by 43%
  • EMPORIUM MODEL• Move all classes to a lab setting• Permit the use of multiple kinds of personnel• Allow students to work as long as they need tomaster the content• Can be adapted for the kinds of students at aparticular institution• Allow multiple courses the same time• Include multiple examples depending uponstudent interests and majors
  • EMPORIUM MODEL
  • REDESIGNING STUDENTLEARNING ENVIRONMENTS
  • UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMASuccess RatesSemester Success RateFall 1998 47.1%Fall 1999 40.6%Fall 2000 50.2%Fall 2001 60.5%Fall 2002 63.0%Fall 2003 78.9%Fall 2004 76.2%Fall 2005 66.7%Fall 2006 73.8%Fall 2007 75.2%Fall 2008 78.1%
  • EMPORIUM MODEL• Very effective with developmental studies• Developmental Math– Cleveland State Community College– Jackson State Community College– Chattanooga State Community College– 37 community colleges in Changing the Equation• Developmental Reading– Northeast State Community College
  • DEVELOPMENTAL READINGNortheast State Community College• Reading Emporium• Annual enrollment 500-550• Problems: High failure rate, course drift, one sizefits all• Goals: improve outcomes, individualized studentprograms, reduce cost course costs• Weekly group meetings, required lab hours, coursenotebook, early exit possible• Results: Nelson Denny test – redesign increase 20points, 12 points more than traditional
  • EMPORIUM MODELAlso being used at:• LSU• Mississippi State University• Oklahoma State University• University of Central Florida• University of Idaho• University of Missouri – St. Louis• University of Nebraska - Omaha• University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill• University of Texas at Arlingtonto name a few….
  • U. OF S. MISSISSIPPIWorld LiteratureTraditional• 16 – 20 sections (~65)• Taught by 8 faculty and 8adjuncts• Faculty do all grading• $70 cost-per-studentRedesign• Single online section• Team-taught by 4 facultyand 4 TAs• 50% automated grading viaWebCT; 50% TAs• $31 cost-per-studentRedesign triples course capacity.
  • STATISTICSOhio State University• Redesign students outscoredtraditional students on commonexams (mean = 78.3 vs. 70)• Percentage of students needing toretake the course reduced from33% to 12%.• Cost-per-student reduced from$191 to $132
  • DEVELOPMENTAL MATHAustin Peay State UniversityFundamentals of Math• Traditional: 33% of students whotook the developmental and thecollege-level course sequentiallywere successful.• Redesign: 70% of students whowould have been assigned to adevelopmental course weresuccessful in the course linked toa workshop.Elements of Statistics• Traditional: 23% of students whotook the developmental and thecollege-level course sequentiallywere successful.• Redesign: 52% of students whowould have been assigned to adevelopmental course weresuccessful in the course linked toa workshop.
  • FACULTY BENEFITS• Increased opportunity to work directly withstudents who need help• Reduced grading• Technology does the tracking and monitoring• More practice and interaction for studentswithout faculty effort• Ability to try different approaches to meetdifferent student needs• Opportunity for continuous improvement ofmaterials and approaches
  • A STREAMLINED REDESIGNMETHODOLOGY“A Menu of Redesign Options”• Six Models for Course Redesign• Five Principles of Successful CourseRedesign• Cost Reduction Strategies• Course Planning Tool• Course Structure Form• Four Models for Assessing StudentLearning• Five Critical Implementation Issues• Planning Checklist
  • REDESIGNING STUDENT LEARNINGENVIRONMENTSCarolyn Jarmon, Ph.D.cjarmon@theNCAT.orgwww.theNCAT.org
  • Assessing Learning and Cost in Course Redesignwith Dr. Carolyn JarmonTuesday, May 7th12:00 PM Eastern / 11:00 AM Central / 10:00 AM Mountain / 9:00 AM Pacific