Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Poems retrieved from Poetry Ireland’s Forum 2000­2013 , the majority of them first drafts and
mostly later published. C. M...
Poems retrieved from Poetry Ireland’s Forum 2000­2013 , the majority of them first drafts and
mostly later published. C. M...
Poems retrieved from Poetry Ireland’s Forum 2000­2013 , the majority of them first drafts and
mostly later published. C. M...
Poems retrieved from Poetry Ireland’s Forum 2000­2013 , the majority of them first drafts and
mostly later published. C. M...
Poems retrieved from Poetry Ireland’s Forum 2000­2013 , the majority of them first drafts and
mostly later published. C. M...
Poems retrieved from Poetry Ireland’s Forum 2000­2013 , the majority of them first drafts and
mostly later published. C. M...
Poems retrieved from Poetry Ireland’s Forum 2000­2013 , the majority of them first drafts and
mostly later published. C. M...
Poems retrieved from Poetry Ireland’s Forum 2000­2013 , the majority of them first drafts and
mostly later published. C. M...
Poems retrieved from Poetry Ireland’s Forum 2000­2013 , the majority of them first drafts and
mostly later published. C. M...
Poems retrieved from Poetry Ireland’s Forum 2000­2013 , the majority of them first drafts and
mostly later published. C. M...
Poems retrieved from Poetry Ireland’s Forum 2000­2013 , the majority of them first drafts and
mostly later published. C. M...
Poems retrieved from Poetry Ireland’s Forum 2000­2013 , the majority of them first drafts and
mostly later published. C. M...
Poems retrieved from Poetry Ireland’s Forum 2000­2013 , the majority of them first drafts and
mostly later published. C. M...
Poems retrieved from Poetry Ireland’s Forum 2000­2013 , the majority of them first drafts and
mostly later published. C. M...
Poems retrieved from Poetry Ireland’s Forum 2000­2013 , the majority of them first drafts and
mostly later published. C. M...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Poetry Ireland Orphans

152

Published on

I won't have the time to remove the conversations, the obits, the reviews and the general silliness . The following pdf contains first drafts of poems that I tested at the Poetry Ireland Forum. The 13 year archive is to be deleted from the PI servers on 08/11/2013

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
152
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Transcript of "Poetry Ireland Orphans"

  1. 1. Poems retrieved from Poetry Ireland’s Forum 2000­2013 , the majority of them first drafts and mostly later published. C. Murray Nanny's Day at the Hag's Playground. Up the road to the Hag's Playground The Vision gets you first, before the sound It is strewn: Pine needles and tree fruits A jellied snake.A pink lolly , bitten through. The canopy of trees bend from the road, unaware of the muted geometrical patterns Patterning the ground.The trees bend in From the road over the rainy soaked ground Bright mechanical marionettes emptied onto The rainy moon­washed ground Leftovers from hard play and joy on Nanny's day at the Hag's Playground.
  2. 2. Poems retrieved from Poetry Ireland’s Forum 2000­2013 , the majority of them first drafts and mostly later published. C. Murray Descent From Croagh Patrick Remember the placing of each and every stone Remember the bone white light of each one Beneath the bones of your feet, Remember the queer light they cast for your dream. He knocks the stones together to get out the green. Remember with your feet as you descend that There's gold in the mountain and that the stones Skim circular on the bed of the stream. He knocks the stones together to get out the green.
  3. 3. Poems retrieved from Poetry Ireland’s Forum 2000­2013 , the majority of them first drafts and mostly later published. C. Murray Santa Maria del Mar The lady in the portico of Santa Maria del Mar upholds her cup at end of out­stretched wrist and the coins slip from my purse. My heart is splitting with my leaving As I walk within the dream church An angel with forehead aflame has dissolved and kept your room. He constructs round me the green carpet of my own hallway The grandmother clock tocking above our fat golden buddha Time to go, time to leave. The angel of leaving occupies her niche at the Hotel Suisse There's a cross jutting from her crown She always will point to where you dream. A roll of names is reeling amongst the flames Of the votive candles And every crown or halo is a crescent moon. A man stands in the gloom half lit by the sunshine in the court nearby the Catalan eternal flame. I begin to weave the remembered streets. The tobacconist sits in her cage of butterflies and fans dispensing her dry wit to a queue of women In the art district. And in your hallway a lady in grey asks me where I am staying? 'en atico, soy irlandesa' The only words of Spanish to drop from my lips­ I count the one hundred and seven steps The image of the indelible blue numbers on a lady's pale wrist accompanies me..
  4. 4. Poems retrieved from Poetry Ireland’s Forum 2000­2013 , the majority of them first drafts and mostly later published. C. Murray The Ragbag The Ragbag. These small sorrrows are mine and they belong to the world. Clothes that the children are outgrown Disgorge brightly from it's mouth I pull at them, a veined mass of scarves and winding sheets unwind onto the floor. Here is a piece for dress­up, a flowery veil, A robe, it could dress a dynasty. The white napkins (plain) A tablecloth (embroidered) flutter on the year's edge And the flowers beneath my feet do not bloom. I feel their stir beneath the loam. (this is Part II of a trilogy about clothing, called 'Scraps)
  5. 5. Poems retrieved from Poetry Ireland’s Forum 2000­2013 , the majority of them first drafts and mostly later published. C. Murray Aluine's Gardens Before the house Behind the sea, a garden. Before the mountain Behind the house, a circuit of trees. Before the house Behind the sea, a strip of mown lawn enclosed with varieties of bees. Before the Mountain Behind the house, rows of alders a circuit make. Before the house Behind the sea, a wild field conceals a blooming garden. Before the mountain Behind the house, a sheltered bench upon which shadows play. Before the house Behind the grass rolling down to rocky beach, a mown strip with flowers and bees. Before the mountain Behind the house, a mazed world to read. Before the house and the grass rolling to rocky shore,
  6. 6. Poems retrieved from Poetry Ireland’s Forum 2000­2013 , the majority of them first drafts and mostly later published. C. Murray a small ingress to rose's bloom and lawn of green. Before the cloud­shrouded Reek Behind the house with fish in the windows, a forest of trees, a flitting child. Before the house a strip of mown grass quietly entrances. Right down to bird's flock at rocky shore it seems the butterflies play. Before the mountain Behind the house of gardens, A row of trees. Birds sing there.
  7. 7. Poems retrieved from Poetry Ireland’s Forum 2000­2013 , the majority of them first drafts and mostly later published. C. Murray Abundance Those images I had trashed, unable to follow their threads Sing now their separation. An arch forms beneath the new Forsythia leaf, Enter the moorhen in her emerald stockings She shakes off the waterdrops. A wood pigeon lumbers through egg­laden, She threads a path through wet grass veined in blue weeds, these mesmerise me. My daisy chain is a fragmented treasure­ That primrose is lone, Lit against her iron post She dreams of banked loam, Inky mountain scenes. False backdrop! Yet she is sweeter for her dreams. (this is related to a prose piece called 'Enter the Moorhen', about kids discovering a vein and net of poetry whilst rehearsing a play)
  8. 8. Poems retrieved from Poetry Ireland’s Forum 2000­2013 , the majority of them first drafts and mostly later published. C. Murray ________ Pretty Useless Things A Summer's Evening, it's Grey raining The flames of five candles are dancing gay, As counterpoint, your little lamp is straining Her low glow across the space between us. And you give me pretty, useless things These light symbols; A golden bowl figured in silver round, red­glazed, a red not in nature found. (I have a cycle completed of 7 pomes and 3 nocturnes, but am loath to publish them at the mo­ internalised drama... this is an old one)
  9. 9. Poems retrieved from Poetry Ireland’s Forum 2000­2013 , the majority of them first drafts and mostly later published. C. Murray Placing the Candles I am mute as I begin to place the candles my hair veil is clasped up, Little voice asks why the veil and why the candles ?­ Husband's hand steadies my grasp and we begin again in one breath A solitude of love, I can feel his hand on the small of my back The gulls are screaming outside I hear their cries, In a relentless wheeling descent.
  10. 10. Poems retrieved from Poetry Ireland’s Forum 2000­2013 , the majority of them first drafts and mostly later published. C. Murray Goldfriend In Anglo­Saxon Literature some of the most evocative songs and poems detailed the exilic condition, some of the poems seemed to contain the voices of those who had already passed through death: the ultimate exile. In other cases the lord or leader was often a god­like persona ; and exile due to crime was considered worse than death. I cannot remember many of the songs but images from them worked their way into my consciousness­ one of the most symbolic descriptions was of the lord/retainer as the Goldfriend. This was written in the time of a death of a close friend and I s'pos is a type of seeking dream that people go through in the grief­time. Goldfriend , (after 'The Wanderer' , Anglo­Saxon) Oak black Rich with age The floor is rich As the glints The jewel­encrusted Brocades give Tapestries glint In the shadows
  11. 11. Poems retrieved from Poetry Ireland’s Forum 2000­2013 , the majority of them first drafts and mostly later published. C. Murray Of this hall Where I have Come to look for you My lord, Goldfriend I go to your hand For forgiveness Maybe Ah but there is nothing For you to forgive Just me Just me Or because you knew I would come . (I can put an excerpt of The Wanderer up that accompanies this, but
  12. 12. Poems retrieved from Poetry Ireland’s Forum 2000­2013 , the majority of them first drafts and mostly later published. C. Murray I had just rooted it out whilst looking for something else)  Dawning on the Square. This is an old one and the paints are from a Cennini book­which I love about making paint..., Dawning on the Square. Burnt ochre to umber liquefies the dark Indigos and charcoal quicken, they bleed ­a capilliary of sorts. The colours ground establish a sky My opaques, ochre from the dirt, The blues a stone.
  13. 13. Poems retrieved from Poetry Ireland’s Forum 2000­2013 , the majority of them first drafts and mostly later published. C. Murray lilies of the Field Plump nipple­blossoms more like, Neatly sewn onto her blue bodice. Virgin surprise, one wink and they're blown confetti on wet ground. (my blossom tree at nite­ in spring­ don't know its name but the little white blossoms look like nipples and they make plum like berries) ________
  14. 14. Poems retrieved from Poetry Ireland’s Forum 2000­2013 , the majority of them first drafts and mostly later published. C. Murray Aluine's Gardens (II draft) Before the house behind the sea, a garden. Before the Mountain behind the house, a circuit of trees. Before the small house behind the grey sea, a strip of mown lawn enclosed with box. Before the tall mountain behind these six white walls of house, rows of young alders a circuit make. Before the house of three steps up behind the rocky strand down to the beach, a wild field conceals her garden's bloom. Before the purple Reek behind the house surrounded by fields, a sheltered bench within a circuit of trees. II. Before that shadow the Reek casts onto green fields behind the grass rolling and tumbling to rocky beach, the lawn encloses varieties of bees. Before Croagh Patrick beyond the flatroof of the house, a mazed world wherein shadows flit. Before the house where grass tumbles to rocky shore behind the sound where gather gulls, a small ingress, a light step to rose's bloom, lawn of green.
  15. 15. Poems retrieved from Poetry Ireland’s Forum 2000­2013 , the majority of them first drafts and mostly later published. C. Murray Before the cloud­shrouded reek behind the house with fish in the window, There is a forest of trees, a flitting child. Before this small house where wind's flute and bassoon mocks the squake of gulls, a strip of lawn entrances to where butterflies play. Before the sheltering reek and behind the small house of gardens, a simple circuit of trees, birds sing there. (don't get up at 3am, you get fecking repetitive, thus get repetitive strain disorder) is the first one better????

×