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Spatial@gov conference 2011 greg scott Spatial@gov conference 2011 greg scott Presentation Transcript

  • Spatial Enablement:International Activities & Perspectives Greg Scott, Geoscience AustraliaAbbas Rajabifard, University of Melbourne spatial@gov 2011 15-17 November 2011, Canberra
  • Presentation abstract• Discuss current initiatives and activities taking place in the international arena that contribute to spatially enabled governments and society• Examine progress to date and consider worldwide challenges and new initiatives that the United Nations and member countries are implementing• Discuss trends, strategies and a vision for a spatially enabled future
  • Permanent Committee on GIS Infrastructure for Asia and the Pacific (PCGIAP)Established in 1995 by a United Nations Resolution
  • PCGIAP aims Maximise the economic, social and environmental benefits of geographic information by providing a forum for nations from Asia and the Pacific to:• Cooperate in the development of a regional geographic information infrastructure• Contribute to the development of the global geographic information infrastructure• Share experiences and consult on matters of common interest• Participate in any other form of activity such as education, training, and technology transfer
  • PCGIAP objectives• Define the nature of a regional geographic information infrastructure that each country can contribute to• Determine the nature of legislative and administrative processes for the acquisition and sharing of spatial data• Develop a regional geodetic framework, regional topographic datasets, national cadastral datasets and regional geographical names datasets as the basis for regional GIS activity• Document the status of key geographic datasets and key agencies in each member nation, and develop a framework for the exchange of such information
  • UNRCC-AP: Background• United Nations Regional Cartographic Conference for Asia and the Pacific – UNRCC-AP – established 1947• Reports to the UN Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC)• Secretariat – UN Statistics Division (UNSD)• Governments of Member States stimulate surveying and mapping of their national territories• Include application of modern technology in surveying and mapping in developing countries, GIS for application in mapping for statistics, population census, land use, environmental protection, cadastral registration, etc.
  • 18th UNRCC-AP Resolutions, October 2009 “Spatial Enablement and the Response to Climate Change and the Millennium Development Goals”1. Regional geodesy2. Capacity building in disaster management3. Data access4. Data integration5. Spatially enabled government and society6. Annual forum on land administration7. Global geographic information management8. 19th UNRCC-AP Strong emphasis on disaster management – a tangible driver for spatially enabled society in the Asia-Pacific region
  • 18th UNRCC-AP Resolutions, October 2009 “Spatial Enablement and the Response to Climate Change and the Millennium Development Goals”WG1: Regional Geodesy Technologies and ApplicationsWG2: Geospatial Data Management and ServicesWG3: Spatially Enabled Government and Society Strong emphasis on disaster management – a tangible driver for spatially enabled society in the Asia-Pacific region
  • The Forum is the result of a Resolution passed by the 14th PCGIAP meeting in Malaysia in 2008 to conduct an annual Land Administration Forum in Asia-Pacific region. 4th UN Sponsored Land Administration Forum 5-7 October 2011, Melbourne Australia
  • Forum Aims and Objectives• To discuss mapping, spatial information, SDI and land administration strategies to facilitate spatially enabled government• To share land administration experiences with a focus on delivering spatial enablement• To share experiences in the Asia and Pacific with a focus on national land administration and 3D cadastre to support e-government• To discuss the role of land administration and mapping agencies in developing a vision for “beyond spatial enablement”
  • Emerging Trends / changing drivers• Participation – Government mandates vs incentives – User feedback• Location as the 4th element of decision making• High accuracy ‘AAA’ data vs. other (crowd-sourced) data• Evolving Standards• Changing directions – Simple vs complex – Autonomous vs interdependent – Spatial everywhere• Growing awareness for openness of data – Licensing – Openness driving improved quality• Services• Enablement vs dependency
  • UN-GGIM
  • UN-GGIM – Geospatial Industry ExchangeThis ‘invitation only’ exchange brought together 90+ leadinternational industry and national mapping organisationrepresentatives to exchange views and discuss the roleof the geospatial industry, and to provide concretesuggestions for input into the UN-GGIM deliberations
  • UN-GGIM – 24-26 October 2011Theme: Global Challenges, Global Mechanism, Global Leadership1st High Level Forum on GGIM opened by Prime Minister Hwang SikKim, Republic of Korea; United Nations Under-Secretary-GeneralMr. Sha Zukang; and Prof. Bill Cartwright, President of the JBGIS350 participants from 90 countries, 15 from internationalorganisations, 22 from industry, and many United Nations agencies(UNSD, UNCS, UNGEGN, UNOOSA, etc)
  • UN-GGIM – Ministerial SegmentMinisters from Chile, Finland, India,Korea, Malaysia, Mongolia, Namibia,and Niger provided views, includingthe value proposition, on the role ofgeospatial information in nationaldevelopmentThe demand for geospatial data doesnot only come from the political levelin the context of policy formulationand decision making, but alsoincreasingly from civil society in thecontext of efficient public servicedelivery, a process that was describedas the “democratization of data”
  • UN-GGIM – 24-26 October 2011Four Thematic Sessions: Session 1: Challenges in Geospatial Policy Formulation and Institutional Arrangements Session 2: Developing Common Frameworks and Methodologies Session 3: International Coordination and Cooperation in Meeting Global Needs Session 3: Capacity Building & Knowledge Transfer
  • UN-GGIM – 24-26 October 2011• The inaugural UN-GGIM Committee of Experts met immediately following the Forum• Opened by Paul Cheung, Director of UN Statistics Division• Elected Co-Chairs: Vanessa Lawrence, DG UK Ordnance Survey, & Mr. Seong-An Leem, DG NGII, Republic of Korea• Second CoE session: 13-15 August 2012, UN in New York• Second UN-GGIM Forum: Doha, Qatar December 2012• Prepare a UN-GGIM statement paper for Rio+20• ECOSOC requested a comprehensive report for the year 2016 – a detailed 5 year progress report• Seoul Declaration prepared
  • UN-GGIM – Seoul Declaration• Foster GIM among UN Member States, international organisations, and the private sector• Foster and strengthen national, regional and global cooperation with the aim of developing an interconnected global community of practice on GI under the umbrella of the UN• Promote common frameworks and standards, as well as harmonised definitions and methods for the treatment of national geospatial data in order to enhance GIM at the national, regional and global level• Share experiences in policy-making, supporting legislation, and funding strategies, to encourage and develop best practices in GIM (collect, store, maintain and disseminate)
  • In conclusion spatial enablement??• Globally, governments and societies are facing increasing and unprecedented challenges. As our coastal cities and urban populations grow, we are becoming increasingly exposed to nature and the results of our own actions. There are different underlying issues that we need to respond to in order to address these challenges• These factors underscore the demand for spatial enablement of government and society. They emphasise the importance of location. The pressing demands for further innovations, to make better use of the available spatial information, and the creation of new, smart applications to harness, integrate and interpret spatial data• Spatial enablement will assist developed and developing nations to pursue sustainable development objectives and it will ensure better productivity and efficiency. To achieve this, the spatial information community must embrace the challenges of location, innovation, and collaboration• Collaboration is critical – forging new partnerships, bringing together communities of practice, sharing knowledge, and working together to better plan and respond to global challenges
  • Spatial Enablement:International Activities & Perspectives Greg Scott, Geoscience AustraliaAbbas Rajabifard, University of Melbourne spatial@gov 2011 15-17 November 2011, Canberra
  • Presentation abstract• Discuss current initiatives and activities taking place in the international arena that contribute to spatially enabled governments and society• Examine progress to date and consider worldwide challenges and new initiatives that the United Nations and member countries are implementing• Discuss trends, strategies and a vision for a spatially enabled future
  • Permanent Committee on GIS Infrastructure for Asia and the Pacific (PCGIAP)Established in 1995 by a United Nations Resolution
  • PCGIAP aims Maximise the economic, social and environmental benefits of geographic information by providing a forum for nations from Asia and the Pacific to:• Cooperate in the development of a regional geographic information infrastructure• Contribute to the development of the global geographic information infrastructure• Share experiences and consult on matters of common interest• Participate in any other form of activity such as education, training, and technology transfer
  • PCGIAP objectives• Define the nature of a regional geographic information infrastructure that each country can contribute to• Determine the nature of legislative and administrative processes for the acquisition and sharing of spatial data• Develop a regional geodetic framework, regional topographic datasets, national cadastral datasets and regional geographical names datasets as the basis for regional GIS activity• Document the status of key geographic datasets and key agencies in each member nation, and develop a framework for the exchange of such information
  • UNRCC-AP: Background• United Nations Regional Cartographic Conference for Asia and the Pacific – UNRCC-AP – established 1947• Reports to the UN Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC)• Secretariat – UN Statistics Division (UNSD)• Governments of Member States stimulate surveying and mapping of their national territories• Include application of modern technology in surveying and mapping in developing countries, GIS for application in mapping for statistics, population census, land use, environmental protection, cadastral registration, etc.
  • 18th UNRCC-AP Resolutions, October 2009 “Spatial Enablement and the Response to Climate Change and the Millennium Development Goals”1. Regional geodesy2. Capacity building in disaster management3. Data access4. Data integration5. Spatially enabled government and society6. Annual forum on land administration7. Global geographic information management8. 19th UNRCC-AP Strong emphasis on disaster management – a tangible driver for spatially enabled society in the Asia-Pacific region
  • 18th UNRCC-AP Resolutions, October 2009 “Spatial Enablement and the Response to Climate Change and the Millennium Development Goals”WG1: Regional Geodesy Technologies and ApplicationsWG2: Geospatial Data Management and ServicesWG3: Spatially Enabled Government and Society Strong emphasis on disaster management – a tangible driver for spatially enabled society in the Asia-Pacific region
  • The Forum is the result of a Resolution passed by the 14th PCGIAP meeting in Malaysia in 2008 to conduct an annual Land Administration Forum in Asia-Pacific region. 4th UN Sponsored Land Administration Forum 5-7 October 2011, Melbourne Australia
  • Forum Aims and Objectives• To discuss mapping, spatial information, SDI and land administration strategies to facilitate spatially enabled government• To share land administration experiences with a focus on delivering spatial enablement• To share experiences in the Asia and Pacific with a focus on national land administration and 3D cadastre to support e-government• To discuss the role of land administration and mapping agencies in developing a vision for “beyond spatial enablement”
  • Emerging Trends / changing drivers• Participation – Government mandates vs incentives – User feedback• Location as the 4th element of decision making• High accuracy ‘AAA’ data vs. other (crowd-sourced) data• Evolving Standards• Changing directions – Simple vs complex – Autonomous vs interdependent – Spatial everywhere• Growing awareness for openness of data – Licensing – Openness driving improved quality• Services• Enablement vs dependency
  • UN-GGIM
  • UN-GGIM – Geospatial Industry ExchangeThis ‘invitation only’ exchange brought together 90+ leadinternational industry and national mapping organisationrepresentatives to exchange views and discuss the roleof the geospatial industry, and to provide concretesuggestions for input into the UN-GGIM deliberations
  • UN-GGIM – 24-26 October 2011Theme: Global Challenges, Global Mechanism, Global Leadership1st High Level Forum on GGIM opened by Prime Minister Hwang SikKim, Republic of Korea; United Nations Under-Secretary-GeneralMr. Sha Zukang; and Prof. Bill Cartwright, President of the JBGIS350 participants from 90 countries, 15 from internationalorganisations, 22 from industry, and many United Nations agencies(UNSD, UNCS, UNGEGN, UNOOSA, etc)
  • UN-GGIM – Ministerial SegmentMinisters from Chile, Finland, India,Korea, Malaysia, Mongolia, Namibia,and Niger provided views, includingthe value proposition, on the role ofgeospatial information in nationaldevelopmentThe demand for geospatial data doesnot only come from the political levelin the context of policy formulationand decision making, but alsoincreasingly from civil society in thecontext of efficient public servicedelivery, a process that was describedas the “democratization of data”
  • UN-GGIM – 24-26 October 2011Four Thematic Sessions: Session 1: Challenges in Geospatial Policy Formulation and Institutional Arrangements Session 2: Developing Common Frameworks and Methodologies Session 3: International Coordination and Cooperation in Meeting Global Needs Session 3: Capacity Building & Knowledge Transfer
  • UN-GGIM – 24-26 October 2011• The inaugural UN-GGIM Committee of Experts met immediately following the Forum• Opened by Paul Cheung, Director of UN Statistics Division• Elected Co-Chairs: Vanessa Lawrence, DG UK Ordnance Survey, & Mr. Seong-An Leem, DG NGII, Republic of Korea• Second CoE session: 13-15 August 2012, UN in New York• Second UN-GGIM Forum: Doha, Qatar December 2012• Prepare a UN-GGIM statement paper for Rio+20• ECOSOC requested a comprehensive report for the year 2016 – a detailed 5 year progress report• Seoul Declaration prepared
  • UN-GGIM – Seoul Declaration• Foster GIM among UN Member States, international organisations, and the private sector• Foster and strengthen national, regional and global cooperation with the aim of developing an interconnected global community of practice on GI under the umbrella of the UN• Promote common frameworks and standards, as well as harmonised definitions and methods for the treatment of national geospatial data in order to enhance GIM at the national, regional and global level• Share experiences in policy-making, supporting legislation, and funding strategies, to encourage and develop best practices in GIM (collect, store, maintain and disseminate)
  • In conclusion spatial enablement??• Globally, governments and societies are facing increasing and unprecedented challenges. As our coastal cities and urban populations grow, we are becoming increasingly exposed to nature and the results of our own actions. There are different underlying issues that we need to respond to in order to address these challenges• These factors underscore the demand for spatial enablement of government and society. They emphasise the importance of location. The pressing demands for further innovations, to make better use of the available spatial information, and the creation of new, smart applications to harness, integrate and interpret spatial data• Spatial enablement will assist developed and developing nations to pursue sustainable development objectives and it will ensure better productivity and efficiency. To achieve this, the spatial information community must embrace the challenges of location, innovation, and collaboration• Collaboration is critical – forging new partnerships, bringing together communities of practice, sharing knowledge, and working together to better plan and respond to global challenges