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CeBIT Gov 2.0 Conference 2012 - Professor John McMillan AO, Australian Information Commissioner, Office of the Australian Information Commissioner
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CeBIT Gov 2.0 Conference 2012 - Professor John McMillan AO, Australian Information Commissioner, Office of the Australian Information Commissioner

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Transcript

  • 1. Protecting information rights –- advancing information policy
  • 2. Open Government Trends in Australia
  • 3. Defining open government• Open government themes – Open information – public access to government information upon request – promotes lively democracy, integrity, better decisions – Open data – proactive publication of public sector information – drives innovation – Open dialogue – civic engagement and collaboration – leads to improved service delivery and participation• Open government styles – Political openness – transparency data – inert/offline data – Technological openness – operational data – adaptable/online data
  • 4. Open government challenges• Implementing open PSI – key challenges identified in OAIC survey of agency practice – complying with web accessibility guidelines – open licensing – applying metadata to documents – adopting charging policies that balance openness and commercialisation – creating an internal governance structure that is aligned to proactive release – leadership support for cultural change
  • 5. Open government challenges• Resolving internal cultural barriers to proactive release – Reluctance to release unrefined data or to lose control of data use – Fear of complaints or liability arising from public reliance on data – Aversion to allowing the private sector to capitalise freely on valuable government data – Misrepresentation of data by data recipients – Special interest objections to disclosure of particular information – Concern about privacy breaches arising from data-matching – Fear of unintended consequences through the way information is used
  • 6. Open government challenges• Aligning agency processes and culture to technological openness: is agency data – – Open by design? – Public by default? – Shared, discoverable, accessible, downloadable, adaptable, re-useable?• Review of the FOI framework for document access
  • 7. Requests (personal / other)Costs (inflation)Fees + charges (inflation) 7
  • 8. Open government challenges• FOI tension points – Increased workload and resource pressures on agencies, and unproductive battles with FOI applicants – Concern that FOI changes inhibit constructive policy development and distort agency briefing and recording keeping – Adapting FOI to current government practices (eg, digital record keeping and proactive engagement with community) – Protecting privacy (including of agency officials) when there is increased electronic publication of FOI disclosures
  • 9. Questions?Protecting information rights – advancing information policy www.oaic.gov.au