Establishing Rapport and Matching   Communication Styles with Test Participants            Human Factors International, In...
Building on the Classic Advice of Dale Carnegie • Give honest and sincere appreciation. • Smile. • Remember that a persons...
Tips & Techniques for User Experience (UX) Interviews & Testing         This session will provide techniques for quickly c...
Goals for this Session • Learn practical tips for building rapport quickly • Understand techniques for establishing a pers...
A Few Quick Stories When We Faced Challenges What we did when we started a user interview or usability test and the partic...
Methods 1.        Engage in small talk 2.        Understand and match verbal interaction styles 3.        Be alert for ver...
1. Engage in Small Talk© 2012 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved.   7
Engage in Small Talk It is NOT small! • Relate experiences regarding the weather • Make associations concerning geography ...
Rules of Engagement for Small Talk 1.        Keep the conversation topic neutral: weather and geography work well. 2.     ...
Rationale for Engaging in Small Talk • You must quickly establish rapport and create a safe and open environment   for par...
2. Understand and Match           Verbal Interaction Styles© 2012 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved.  ...
Understand and Match Verbal Interaction Styles There are vast amounts of research available on personality types and mood,...
Interaction Styles      However, these are too extensive and complex to have bearing on the      quick assessment that you...
Direct Style • No-nonsense, to-the-point, clipped verbal responses • Not afraid to talk We suggest that you tone back your...
Light-hearted Style • Warm and engaging • Rarely need prompting to provide interaction We recommend that you scale up your...
Humorous Style • Quick with finding humor • Laughs easily We suggest you engage and respond with humor of your own, if you...
Quiet Style • Seems to say very little without prompting • Does not tend to elaborate • May be nervous or shy We recommend...
Audience Participation© 2012 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved.   18
Audience Participation We will conduct a very brief role play, having you use one or more of the rapport-building methods ...
Audience Participation Handout for INTERVIEWER Your practice interviewee here will be a bit challenging. Your job is to: •...
Audience Participation Handout for PARTICIPANT As the interviewer introduces the session, role play that you are uncomfort...
3. Be Alert for Verbal Cues© 2012 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved.   22
Be Alert for Verbal Cues • You should make note of how the participants express themselves. • By attempting to match the s...
Verbal Cues for Visual A primarily visual person may use visual language, such as: “I see what you mean,” or “That looks g...
Verbal Cues for Auditory A primarily auditory person may use language related to hearing, such as: “I hear you,” or “Sound...
Verbal Cues for Kinesthetic People who are primarily kinesthetic may use words related to touch & feeling, such as: “I fee...
Examples and Case Studies© 2012 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved.   27
Examples and Case Studies Formal Usability Testing Lab  Testing a Web site dealing with personal financial information In...
Summary • Engage in small talk • Understand and match verbal interaction styles • Be alert for verbal cues Use the techniq...
Human Factors International, Inc.                   User Experience for a Better World   Thanks!   mary.michaels@humanfact...
Job Aid for Establishing Rapport       Engage in small talk       1.       Keep the conversation topic neutral: weather an...
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UXPA 2012 Establishing Rapport and Matching Communication Styles with Test Participants

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UXPA 2012 Establishing Rapport and Matching Communication Styles with Test Participants

  1. 1. Establishing Rapport and Matching Communication Styles with Test Participants Human Factors International, Inc. User Experience for a Better World UPA International 21st Annual Conference 5 June 2012 Mary M. Michaels & Catherine D. Gaddy www.humanfactors.com© 2012 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved.
  2. 2. Building on the Classic Advice of Dale Carnegie • Give honest and sincere appreciation. • Smile. • Remember that a persons name is to that person the sweetest and most important sound in any language. • Make the other person feel important - and do it sincerely. Now, what else should we do to help establish rapport? http://www.westegg.com/unmaintained/carnegie/win-friends.html© 2012 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 2
  3. 3. Tips & Techniques for User Experience (UX) Interviews & Testing This session will provide techniques for quickly connecting with your participants. Learn what works and why so that you can increase your skills and effectiveness facilitating both in-person and remote moderated studies.© 2012 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 3
  4. 4. Goals for this Session • Learn practical tips for building rapport quickly • Understand techniques for establishing a personable tone during the sessions • Increase your skills in determining the interaction style of the participant through visual, verbal, and audio cues • Explore methods for matching the participant’s style • Discover ways to make the testing even more enjoyable, while still keeping the rigor needed • Gain insight on how these techniques can help you demonstrate leadership at your organization to assist others with their interview moderation skills© 2012 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 4
  5. 5. A Few Quick Stories When We Faced Challenges What we did when we started a user interview or usability test and the participant… • Would not make eye contact • Would not talk • Seemed very nervous© 2012 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 5
  6. 6. Methods 1. Engage in small talk 2. Understand and match verbal interaction styles 3. Be alert for verbal cues© 2012 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 6
  7. 7. 1. Engage in Small Talk© 2012 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 7
  8. 8. Engage in Small Talk It is NOT small! • Relate experiences regarding the weather • Make associations concerning geography • Forge positive first impressions by showing interest • Use body language to reinforce engagement© 2012 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 8
  9. 9. Rules of Engagement for Small Talk 1. Keep the conversation topic neutral: weather and geography work well. 2. Be specific (“Hi, how are you?” vs. “Hi, how was your ride in today?”) 3. If in person, use body language to indicate a welcoming atmosphere. • Avoid crossing your arms, having a closed body stance, or maintaining a “poker face.” • A smile, a nod, or a handshake is much more likely to be welcoming, and encourages others to engage with you. • Lean slightly towards the participant when you are seated to help indicate interest.© 2012 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 9
  10. 10. Rationale for Engaging in Small Talk • You must quickly establish rapport and create a safe and open environment for participants. • Data gathering interviews and usability testing situations benefit from the honest input and reactions from participants. • User experience testing probes deeper into the psychology of desire and the various factors dealing with Persuasion, Emotion, and Trust (PET) where there is more emphasis on the triggers and blocks in motivation. • You need to enhance your facilitation skills to be able to gain trust, particularly when asking participants about potentially sensitive topics on their decision making.© 2012 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 10
  11. 11. 2. Understand and Match Verbal Interaction Styles© 2012 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 11
  12. 12. Understand and Match Verbal Interaction Styles There are vast amounts of research available on personality types and mood, such as the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, or Keirsey Temperament Sorter, etc. From: http://www.keirsey.com/4temps/overview_temperaments.asp© 2012 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 12
  13. 13. Interaction Styles However, these are too extensive and complex to have bearing on the quick assessment that you need to do at the start of an interview. Therefore, you can somewhat oversimplify, and group the participant as:  Direct  Light-hearted  Humorous  Quiet http://www.amazon.com/White-Dwarfs-Disney-Special-Platinum/dp/B00003CXCQ© 2012 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 13
  14. 14. Direct Style • No-nonsense, to-the-point, clipped verbal responses • Not afraid to talk We suggest that you tone back your zeal somewhat, and keep the conversation fairly straightforward without embellishment.© 2012 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 14
  15. 15. Light-hearted Style • Warm and engaging • Rarely need prompting to provide interaction We recommend that you scale up your enthusiasm to match the participant’s. Still be mindful of your role to keep the testing session on track, and achieve objective results about both positive & negative aspects of the area being studied.© 2012 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 15
  16. 16. Humorous Style • Quick with finding humor • Laughs easily We suggest you engage and respond with humor of your own, if you can, while always ensuring that no insensitive or offensive remarks are made.© 2012 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 16
  17. 17. Quiet Style • Seems to say very little without prompting • Does not tend to elaborate • May be nervous or shy We recommend that you respect this style and scale back accordingly, while also looking for relevant opportunities to ask the participant to elaborate.© 2012 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 17
  18. 18. Audience Participation© 2012 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 18
  19. 19. Audience Participation We will conduct a very brief role play, having you use one or more of the rapport-building methods presented so far. This will provide an opportunity for you to practice, based on what we have just discussed.© 2012 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 19
  20. 20. Audience Participation Handout for INTERVIEWER Your practice interviewee here will be a bit challenging. Your job is to: • Build rapport quickly • Establish a personable tone • Match the interaction style of the participant Here is your script: Hi, my name is _______. Thanks for helping us today. We’re going to spend the next few minutes asking you about any problems or shortcomings you’ve noticed so far about your: [cell phone / smart phone / mobile device]© 2012 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 20
  21. 21. Audience Participation Handout for PARTICIPANT As the interviewer introduces the session, role play that you are uncomfortable, interrupt them, and ask a couple of questions, such as: • Are there right or wrong answers? • Can I show you whatever I want? • Are there other people watching or listening to us? Or…any other related questions you can think of!© 2012 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 21
  22. 22. 3. Be Alert for Verbal Cues© 2012 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 22
  23. 23. Be Alert for Verbal Cues • You should make note of how the participants express themselves. • By attempting to match the sensory wavelength of participants, you should be able to establish better communication connections. • The matching is a subtle method, but given the brief amount of time that you have with participants, it’s worth a reasonable effort. • Understanding participants and their emotions helps you uncover their decision-making processes.© 2012 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 23
  24. 24. Verbal Cues for Visual A primarily visual person may use visual language, such as: “I see what you mean,” or “That looks good.” During unscripted moments before a test or between interview sections, you can use visual phases, such as: “We are very interested in what you will see in ____.”© 2012 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 24
  25. 25. Verbal Cues for Auditory A primarily auditory person may use language related to hearing, such as: “I hear you,” or “Sounds good.” During unscripted times, you can use auditory phases, such as: “We are very interested hearing what you have to say about ____.”© 2012 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 25
  26. 26. Verbal Cues for Kinesthetic People who are primarily kinesthetic may use words related to touch & feeling, such as: “I feel good about that,” or “I don’t feel there is any difference.” During unscripted times, you can use phrases related to kinesthetics, such as: “We want to know what you feel about ____.” Quickly establishing rapport with participants is vital, since emotions and feelings are key to decision-making.© 2012 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 26
  27. 27. Examples and Case Studies© 2012 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 27
  28. 28. Examples and Case Studies Formal Usability Testing Lab  Testing a Web site dealing with personal financial information In-Person Onsite Testing  Testing an interface during a high-stress event at a convention Remote Moderated Usability Testing  Testing a Web app with upper-level IT staff about a global software support site© 2012 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 28
  29. 29. Summary • Engage in small talk • Understand and match verbal interaction styles • Be alert for verbal cues Use the techniques from job aid, and feel free to share with your colleagues. And enjoy your precious time with users… it’s like gold!© 2012 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 29
  30. 30. Human Factors International, Inc. User Experience for a Better World Thanks! mary.michaels@humanfactors.com cathy.gaddy@humanfactors.com Human Factors International Corporate Headquarters 410 West Lowe P.O. Box 2020 Fairfield, IA 52556 USA Phone: (800) 242-4480 (641) 472-4480 Fax: (641) 472-5412© 2012 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved.
  31. 31. Job Aid for Establishing Rapport Engage in small talk 1. Keep the conversation topic neutral: weather and geography work well. 2. Be specific (“Hi, how are you?” vs. “Hi, how was your ride in today?”) 3. If in person, use body language to indicate a welcoming atmosphere. Understand and match verbal interaction styles • Direct • Light-hearted • Humorous • Quiet Be alert for verbal cues • Visual • Auditory • Kinesthetic© 2012 Human Factors International, Inc. All rights reserved. 31

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