Diversity as an Essential Component of CSR

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This seminar was presented to students at the University of Toronto, St. Michael's Certificate in Corporate Social Responsibility on May 10, 2013.

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  • It isn’t different from…It includes the SWAMIt MUST include the SWAM
  • It isn’t different from…It includes the SWAMIt MUST include the SWAM
  • I cannot tolerate the word tolerance. Tolerance means I will put up with you but I wont like it. Inclusion means you are as welcome as me. I tolerate going to the dentist.
  • GRI G3.1, launched in 2011, has expanded guidance for reporting on human rights, local community impacts, and genderDifferentiate between Core and Additional Indicators. All Indicators have been developed through GRI’s multi-stakeholder processes, and those designated as Core are generally applicable Indicators and are assumed to be material for most organizations. An organization should report onthese unless they are deemed not material on the basis of the Reporting Principles. AdditionalIndicators may also be determined to be material.
  • GRI G3.1, launched in 2011, has expanded guidance for reporting on human rights, local community impacts, and genderDifferentiate between Core and Additional Indicators. All Indicators have been developed through GRI’s multi-stakeholder processes, and those designated as Core are generally applicable Indicators and are assumed to be material for most organizations. An organization should report onthese unless they are deemed not material on the basis of the Reporting Principles. AdditionalIndicators may also be determined to be material.There are 14 GRI indicators that focus on diversity equity and human rights.
  • GRI G3.1, launched in 2011, has expanded guidance for reporting on human rights, local community impacts, and gender
  • GRI G3.1, launched in 2011, has expanded guidance for reporting on human rights, local community impacts, and gender
  • GRI G3.1, launched in 2011, has expanded guidance for reporting on human rights, local community impacts, and gender
  • GRI G3.1, launched in 2011, has expanded guidance for reporting on human rights, local community impacts, and gender
  • GRI G3.1, launched in 2011, has expanded guidance for reporting on human rights, local community impacts, and gender
  • GRI G3.1, launched in 2011, has expanded guidance for reporting on human rights, local community impacts, and gender
  • GRI G3.1, launched in 2011, has expanded guidance for reporting on human rights, local community impacts, and gender
  • GRI G3.1, launched in 2011, has expanded guidance for reporting on human rights, local community impacts, and gender
  • GRI G3.1, launched in 2011, has expanded guidance for reporting on human rights, local community impacts, and gender
  • GRI G3.1, launched in 2011, has expanded guidance for reporting on human rights, local community impacts, and gender
  • GRI G3.1, launched in 2011, has expanded guidance for reporting on human rights, local community impacts, and gender
  • 1 in 5 Canadians a “visible minority.” HR Tribunal finds company negligent due to polices even though complainant could not prove discrimination.The Tribunal concluded that Herman Miller had not diligently followed up on his complaint that he was being discriminated against in the workplace. It also found he was terminated in part because he had raised issues of harassment and threatened to sue the company.The Tribunal awarded $55,799.70 in damages for lost wages and $15,000 in general damages for injury to dignity, feelings and self-respect. The company was also required to have a human rights expert review its policies and train managers. Fermo was ordered to complete the “Human Rights 101 eLearning Module” prepared by the Ontario Human Rights Commission, even though he was no longer employed by Herman Miller Canada Inc.
  • 1 in 5 Canadians a “visible minority.” HR Tribunal finds company negligent due to polices even though complainant could not prove discrimination.The Tribunal concluded that Herman Miller had not diligently followed up on his complaint that he was being discriminated against in the workplace. It also found he was terminated in part because he had raised issues of harassment and threatened to sue the company.The Tribunal awarded $55,799.70 in damages for lost wages and $15,000 in general damages for injury to dignity, feelings and self-respect. The company was also required to have a human rights expert review its policies and train managers. Fermo was ordered to complete the “Human Rights 101 eLearning Module” prepared by the Ontario Human Rights Commission, even though he was no longer employed by Herman Miller Canada Inc.
  • 1 in 5 Canadians a “visible minority.” HR Tribunal finds company negligent due to polices even though complainant could not prove discrimination.The Tribunal concluded that Herman Miller had not diligently followed up on his complaint that he was being discriminated against in the workplace. It also found he was terminated in part because he had raised issues of harassment and threatened to sue the company.The Tribunal awarded $55,799.70 in damages for lost wages and $15,000 in general damages for injury to dignity, feelings and self-respect. The company was also required to have a human rights expert review its policies and train managers. Fermo was ordered to complete the “Human Rights 101 eLearning Module” prepared by the Ontario Human Rights Commission, even though he was no longer employed by Herman Miller Canada Inc.
  • Women wont achieve equality for 228 years at our current pace of changeWomen in Canada are as healthy and educated as men, but gender equality plummets when it comes to economic and political opportunities, according to a new study.Even though six of Canada’s provinces and territories have female premiers, women’s representation in politics and on corporate boards has grown by just 2.3 per cent in the past two decades, says the study by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternativesreleased Tuesday.SRI Fund – Global Women Equity Corp, global women equity fund. Among the requirements: Companies in fund must have signed the UN’s Women Empowerment Principles – Equality Means Business commitment, must have 25% or more women directors or executive officers, be a member of Catalyst, signed and adhere to the Women on Board pledge from the European Commission.Lisa Raitt Prospectors and Developers Association of Canada
  • Women wont achieve equality for 228 years at our current pace of changeWomen in Canada are as healthy and educated as men, but gender equality plummets when it comes to economic and political opportunities, according to a new study.Even though six of Canada’s provinces and territories have female premiers, women’s representation in politics and on corporate boards has grown by just 2.3 per cent in the past two decades, says the study by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternativesreleased Tuesday.SRI Fund – Global Women Equity Corp, global women equity fund. Among the requirements: Companies in fund must have signed the UN’s Women Empowerment Principles – Equality Means Business commitment, must have 25% or more women directors or executive officers, be a member of Catalyst, signed and adhere to the Women on Board pledge from the European Commission.Lisa Raitt Prospectors and Developers Association of Canada
  • The number of people with disabilities has reached 1 in 5;
  • The number of people with disabilities has reached 1 in 5;
  • In the last decade we welcomed 2.1 million new immigrantsBy 2030, Canada will be 100% completely dependent on immigration for any population growth (Statistics Canada);Currently, we are already dependent on immigrants for any labour force growth (Conference Board);Yet immigrants are underemployed. 40% of newcomers make a downward shift in their careers when they arrive in Canada.People not working to full potential has $1.5 to 2 billion impact on economy.
  • In the last decade we welcomed 2.1 million new immigrantsBy 2030, Canada will be 100% completely dependent on immigration for any population growth (Statistics Canada);Currently, we are already dependent on immigrants for any labour force growth (Conference Board);Yet immigrants are underemployed. 40% of newcomers make a downward shift in their careers when they arrive in Canada.People not working to full potential has $1.5 to 2 billion impact on economy.
  • In the last decade we welcomed 2.1 million new immigrantsBy 2030, Canada will be 100% completely dependent on immigration for any population growth (Statistics Canada);Currently, we are already dependent on immigrants for any labour force growth (Conference Board);Yet immigrants are underemployed. 40% of newcomers make a downward shift in their careers when they arrive in Canada.People not working to full potential has $1.5 to 2 billion impact on economy.
  • Our seven key areas of expertise:When Michael began to envision this organization, it was originally conceived to be an association for D&I professionals in Canada. However, through discussions with many leading D&I professionals – many of whom became members of our Advisory Board – Michael realized that much more was needed. Therefore we have evolved our focus and now have 7 interconnected areas of expertise.   Member Association.Support for our members and employer partners on their D&I journey. Quarterly Networking and best practice sharing events in four cities, and expanding to other cities as we have more members there. We’ve already hosted two networking events in Alberta last week, and we received great feedback from the people who attended. We call them our Community of Practice Events. We have one in Vancouver on April 30th and Toronto on May 8th. The first ones are free and open to the public should you like to attend. Additional events might include ERG events, diversity council events, & executive or C-suite roundtables. Education.We are creating a library of courses including online, in-person and blended learning.Leadersmanagement teamsERG leadersHR and D&I professionalsGeneral courses for employeesAlso we will do custom courses and coachingMonthly webinars started this month, and we are committed to providing monthly webinars on at least one subject, provided at different times throughout the month.Canadian Diversity Professional certificationThink Tank.We are conducting cutting-edge exclusive research that will contribute to the Canadian conversation on diversity and inclusion. We want to address gaps, not reinvent the wheel or re-do research that has already been done.Our first report on measurement practices in Canadian organizations was released last week. It’s the first publicly available report on this topic in Canada. If you want read the report, there is a link to it from the front page of our website. Legislative Support.We are creating a practice that will provide help with legislative compliance for our members or clients. For example, employment equity reporting, employment equity audits, and AODA compliance, to name a few. AODA = Access for Ontarians with Disabilities Act, and is one of the most advanced disability access legislations to be enacted in any jurisdiction. Several other provinces have been consulting with the Ontario government and are considering enacting similar legislation. Knowledge Repository.We are creating an e-library for D&I research, data, and leading practice information from Canada and around the world. It will be indexed and searchable.Where reports are in the public domain, we’ll house the PDF’s right on our site.Where reports are available for purchase we’ll provide a synopsis and link to their site where people can purchase the report if they wish. We’ve already formed a partnership with the Conference Board to do this, and are in the process of speaking to other research organizations to partner with them and share their important research Consultancy.Our team collectively has nearly 30 years experience doing D&I work within organizations. We offer the following services on a for-fee basisbusiness case and diversity strategy development.policy and document development.inclusion surveys.metrics development.two online tools: a Equity Census and Diversity Scorecard D&I administration and project management.outsourced diversity management services.We will also refer work for which we don’t have the expertise to other qualified consultants in the market.
  • - We currently have 21 employer partners, all of which are listed here. - If your company is not on this list, I can only imagine how embarrassed you must be not seeing your logo up here. I would encourage you to speak with me after the presentation to find out more, or you can visit our website.- Ok. Enough of the sales pitch.
  • What do you think is missing from my report?What else would you have wanted to know?Are there any other research topics that you would like to see from the CIDI?
  • 1.Gathering Preliminary Information and Literature Review. Extensive internet research to find publicly available reports. Read the only book on the subject: The Diversity Scorecard, by E.E. Hubbard. Reviewed websites of every employer on the 2012 Canada’s Best Diversity Employers list. 2.Online Survey. wide range of sizes, geographies and sectors of employers, including non-profit, government, healthcare, education, and for-profit companies across Canada. 3.In-depth Research Interviews.19 interviews 16 D&I leaders at major Canadian employers and 3 consultants who have worked with dozens of organizations to set up diversity measures and scorecards.4. The writing always takes longer than you think it will. I’d like to thank the team at CIDI for multiple rounds of editing as well!
  • We reviewed the websites of the 2012 Canada’s Best Diversity Employers List. Looked at the write ups on the site for why they made the list, Also examined every page on diversity on each organizations website Purpose: To see what they were saying about their Diversity Measurement Practices. And we found. Not much. Most do not mention their diversity measurement practices at all. Some have vague references to goals which they measure, No explicit explanation of the goals or how they are measuring. Some orgs’ websites refer to “strategic plan”. We are left to infer that a strategic plans include measures of success for strategic goals. Some orgs that do have diversity scorecards don’t mention it at all on their website. Exceptions: Orgs doing Social Responsibility reporting using the GRI (Global Reporting Initiative) guidelines. Entire CSR report online with all the GRI goals & results. GRI is the world standard for CSR reporting andRequires standard measures re: financial, environmental and social impacts of an organization. The GRI Social indicators include D&I elements
  • Just over half of survey respondents (52.9%) conducted employee census or asked employees to self-identify based on demographic categories. That means nearly half of organizations do not even track basic demographic data about their workforces. Why does this matter?Gathering employee demographic data is widely considered a basic practice and a first step for organizations dedicated to improving inclusion. If you don’t understand who is in your organization, how can you develop strategies that respond to the needs of your people?Measuring the demographics in your organization is instrumental for:identifying gaps in representation and determining inclusion issues and Identifying barriers to advancement, so that you can: set goals, establish appropriate programs and initiatives, and measure results
  • 32.7 of survey respondents are collecting demographic data it because they are legally required to – either because they are federally regulated organizations or because they are federal contractors, Now remember from the last slide, only 52.0% of orgs are even collecting demographic data at all…..
  • That means, only 20.2 % of the organizations are doing it voluntarily.
  • Nearly 80% of organizations stated that diversity, inclusiveness, equity and/or human rights are considered a strategic priority within their organization.This is great right? Well we would hope to see 100%, but almost 80% is good. Right?
  • Less than 19% of organizations are measuring the impact, efficacy or ROI (return on investment) of their diversity, inclusiveness, equity and/or human rights initiatives.This is puzzling. How many other strategic initiatives does your organization NOT measure?Many organizations invest significant resources in D&I initiatives. Why would three fifths of organizations NOT measure something they consider to be a strategic priority? How can they know whether their efforts are effective or making an impact? This suggests a gap between Canadian organizations’ desire to see D&I as a strategic priority and the actual practices to back up that desire. For most organizations, anything that is truly a strategic priority has robust metrics to show efficacy or impact. Even more puzzling…..
  • Only 12.5 % of organizations are using a Diversity Scorecard. Why is this a problem?As we know – what gets measured gets done. What are the leaders of your organization paying attention to? Your strategic reporting or your scorecard, right?As D&I champions, we need to get better at showing our organizational leaders the value of our diversity initiatives.Let’s take a look at some stats from organizations that ARE using a Diversity Scorecard
  • What percentage of respondents who are using a Diversity Scorecard said that the Scorecard had raised the profile of their diversity, inclusiveness, equity and/or human rights initiatives among the organization's leadership?What percentage of respondents who are using a Diversity Scorecard said that it has become part of the strategic reporting for their organization?It’s hard to argue with 100%
  • What percentage of respondents who are using a Diversity Scorecard said that the Scorecard had raised the profile of their diversity, inclusiveness, equity and/or human rights initiatives among the organization's leadership?What percentage of respondents who are using a Diversity Scorecard said that it has become part of the strategic reporting for their organization?It’s hard to argue with 100%
  • Representation of diverse/under-represented groups by job levelRecruitment, promotion, and turnover statistics by demographic groupEmployee engagement scores by demographic groupDiversity-related or inclusiveness questions on employee surveys Human rights, harassment, or discrimination complaints Participation in training on diversity, inclusiveness, equity and/or human rightsParticipation in Employee Resource/Networking GroupsASK AUDIENCE - What do all methods 1 through 4 have in common? ANSWER: They all require the organizaton to have collected demographic data. Remember – just over half of organizations are collecting demographic data, and only 20 % were doThe O’Mara and Richter report “Global Diversity and Inclusion Benchmarks” indicates most of these measurements fall in the first and second quartile of global diversity initiatives.
  • lagging indicators measure of what has already happened in an organization, such as turnover, lawsuits and complaints, leading indicators predict what will happen with an employee’s experience, and those are more important than lagging indicators when measuring diversity and inclusion work. leading indicators may include whether the employee has a mentor or executive sponsor, or which employees are working on high-profile projects/clients.
  • What do you think was the biggest barriers to actually conducting robust diversity measurements within organizations?ResourcesLegal ObjectionsResistance to asking for personal / private informationConcerns over privacyHow to overcome the concerns: communications.
  • These findings are compiled from amongst the literature review and the interviews conducted with Canadian diversity leadersOwned by the most senior leaders of the company. The top leader is accountable for the results and hold their leadership teams accountable.Leaders are involved in developing the scorecardThe results are relevant to the organization’s strategic goalsThe organization is ready for the measures
  • These findings are compiled from amongst the literature review and the interviews conducted with Canadian diversity leadersA wide range of year-over-year data are available on all aspects of the employee experience throughout all levels of the organization Leadership teams regularly read and understand the scorecardLeadership and managers understand how they can personally impact the resultsIt is communicated effectively and consistently through multiple communication methodsMeasures demonstrate efficacy and impact, not just list activities undertaken
  • What do you think is missing from my report?What else would you have wanted to know?Are there any other research topics that you would like to see from the CIDI?
  • Diversity as an Essential Component of CSR

    1. 1. DIVERSITY & CSRCertificate in Corporate Social ResponsibilityUniversity of St. Michael’s CollegeMay 10, 2013Cathy Gallagher-LouisyDirector, Community Partnerships and Knowledge Services
    2. 2. Agenda for Today’s Session• Defining Diversity & Inclusion• What does Diversity have to do with CSR?• The Business Case for Managing Diversity & Inclusion• The CIDI Story• Highlights From our Research
    3. 3. DEFINING “DIVERSITY”“We do not see things as they are,we see things as we are.”-Anais Nin
    4. 4. What is Diversity?di·ver·si·ty1. the state or fact of being diverse;difference; unlikeness.2. variety; multiformity.3. a point of difference.
    5. 5. What is Inclusion?in·clu·sion1. the act of including.2. the state of being included.
    6. 6. Diversity and Inclusion Defined.DifferenceIncluding• Diversity is about Difference.• Inclusion is about Including.
    7. 7. Diversity and Inclusion Defined.DifferenceIncluding• Diversity is about Difference.• Inclusion is about Including.Diversity hassometimes been aboutcounting people.Inclusion is aboutmaking people count.
    8. 8. But What IS Diversity?Diverse Non-Diverse
    9. 9. But What IS Diversity?Diverse
    10. 10. Organizational Diversity Terminology• Diversity & Inclusion• Equity & Human Rights• Equality• Anti-Racism Policy• Anti-Oppressive Practice
    11. 11. Verbiage is ImportantInclusionvsTolerance
    12. 12. Verbiage is ImportantEquality is giving everyoneEquity is giving everyone
    13. 13. Verbiage is ImportantEquality is giving everyonea shoe.Equity is giving everyonea shoe that fits.
    14. 14. Diversity Major Areas of Focus• Gender• Race/Ethnicity• Culture• Indigenous Peoples• Ability• Sexual Orientation• Age / Generation• Socioeconomic Status... and many more ...
    15. 15. DIVERSITYAS AN ESSENTIALCOMPONENT OF CSR“The real voyage of discovery consists notin seeking new landscapes, but in havingnew eyes.”– Marcel Proust.
    16. 16. CommunityEnvironment Ethics/GovernanceEmployeesHuman RightsCSRPillars of CSR
    17. 17. CommunityEnvironment Ethics/GovernanceEmployeesHuman RightsCSRDIVERSITYPillars of CSR
    18. 18. CommunityEnvironment Ethics/GovernanceEmployeesHuman RightsCSRDIVERSITYPillars of CSR
    19. 19. GRI SOCIAL INDICATORSG3.1 Guidelines (released 2011)"Communities that include everyonebecome stronger and everyone wins."-Jane Imbody
    20. 20. Labor Practices and Decent WorkAspect: EmploymentCore Indicator LA1• Total workforce by employment type, employmentcontract, and region, broken down by gender.Core Indicator LA2• Total number and rate of new employee hires andemployee turnover by age group, gender, and region.Core Indicator LA15• Return to work and retention rates afterparental leave, by gender.
    21. 21. Labor Practices and Decent WorkAspect: Occupational Health and SafetyCore Indicator LA7• Rates of injury, occupational diseases, lost days, andabsenteeism, and total number of work-related fatalities,by region and by gender.
    22. 22. Labor Practices and Decent WorkAspect: Training and EducationCore Indicator LA10• Average hours of training per year per employee bygender, and by employee category.Additional Indicator LA12• Percentage of employees receiving regular performanceand career development reviews, by gender.
    23. 23. Labor Practices and Decent WorkAspect: Diversity and Equal OpportunityCore Indicator LA13• Composition of governance bodies and breakdown ofemployees per employee category according to gender,age group, minority group membership, and otherindicators of diversity.
    24. 24. Labor Practices and Decent WorkAspect: Equal Remuneration for Women and MenCore Indicator LA14• Ratio of basic salary and remuneration of women to menby employee category, by significant locations ofoperation.
    25. 25. Human RightsAspect: Investment and Procurement PracticesCore Indicator HR1• Percentage and total number of significant investmentagreements and contracts that include clausesincorporating human rights concerns, or that haveundergone human rights screening.Core Indicator HR2• Percentage of significant suppliers, contractors, and otherbusiness partners that have undergone human rightsscreening, and actions taken.
    26. 26. Human RightsAspect: Investment and Procurement PracticesCore Indicator HR3• Total hours of employee training on policies andprocedures concerning aspects of human rights that arerelevant to operations, including the percentage ofemployees trained.
    27. 27. Human RightsAspect: Non-discriminationCore Indicator HR4• Total number of incidents of discrimination and correctiveactions taken.Aspect: Security PracticesAdditional Indicator HR8• Percentage of security personnel trained in theorganization’s policies or procedures concerning aspectsof human rights that are relevant to operations.
    28. 28. Human RightsAspect: Indigenous RightsAdditional Indicator HR9• Total number of incidents of violations involvingrights of indigenous people and actions taken.
    29. 29. Human RightsAspect: AssessmentCore Indicator HR10• Percentage and total number of operations that have beensubject to human rights reviews and/or impact assessments.Aspect: RemediationCore Indicator HR11• Number of grievances related to human rights filed,addressed, and resolved through formal grievancemechanisms.
    30. 30. SocietyAspect: : Local CommunitiesCore Indicator SO1• Percentage of operations with implemented localcommunity engagement, impact assessments, anddevelopment programs.Core Indicator S09• Operations with significant potential or actual negativeimpacts on local communities.
    31. 31. SocietyAspect: Local CommunitiesCore Indicator SO10• Prevention and mitigation measures implemented inoperations with significant potential or actual negative impactson local communities.Aspect: ComplianceCore Indicator SO8• Monetary value of significant fines and total number of non-monetary sanctions for non-compliance with laws andregulations.
    32. 32. THE BUSINESS CASE“Most progressive corporations understandthat this is one of those instances where whatyou think is the right thing to do and what is inyour business interest, cross over perfectly.”- Ed Clark, president and chief executiveofficer of Toronto-Dominion Bank.
    33. 33. “It takes 20 years to build areputation and five minutes toruin it.” – Warren Buffet
    34. 34. “It takes 20 years to build areputation and five minutes toruin it.” – Warren Buffet
    35. 35. Recent Headlines – Ethnicity
    36. 36. Recent Headlines – Ethnicity
    37. 37. Recent Headlines – Ethnicity
    38. 38. Recent Headlines – Women
    39. 39. Recent Headlines – Women
    40. 40. Recent Headlines – LGBT
    41. 41. Recent Headlines – LGBT
    42. 42. Recent Headlines – LGBT
    43. 43. Recent Headlines – Disabilities
    44. 44. Recent Headlines – Disabilities
    45. 45. Recent Headlines – Immigration
    46. 46. Recent Headlines – Immigration
    47. 47. Recent Headlines – Immigration
    48. 48. Recent Headlines – Aboriginal People
    49. 49. Recent Headlines – Aboriginal People
    50. 50. Aboriginal Statistics.Aboriginal people are the fastest growing population, but have:• Lower life expectancy• Higher infant mortality rate• An average income $10,000 less than non-Aboriginal peopleAboriginal people are:• Three times more likely to be unemployed• Four times more likely to depend on welfare• Five times more likely to be in jail• Six times more likely to be murdered* Canadian Council for Aboriginal Business
    51. 51. QuizIn what school year did women start to account for morethan 50% of undergraduate degrees?
    52. 52. QuizIn what school year did women start to account for morethan 50% of undergraduate degrees?1979-1980
    53. 53. Women in Canadian BusinessCatalyst. Catalyst Pyramid: Canadian Women in Business. New York: Catalyst, 2013.
    54. 54. WHY FOCUS ON DIVERSITY?"Inclusion and accessibility are basicpillars of everyday democracy.”- Michael Briguglio
    55. 55. Effectiveness increative tasksReference: Adler, N. J. International Dimensions of Organizational Behavior. 4th ed. Cincinnati, OH: South-Western, 2002.Monocultural TeamsMulticulturalTeamsMulticulturalTeamsLess More-- -- --- -++ +++ + ++Managing Diversity
    56. 56. Leader acknowledges andsupports cultural differenceCultural difference becomes anasset to performanceEffectiveness increative tasksReference: Adler, N. J. International Dimensions of Organizational Behavior. 4th ed. Cincinnati, OH: South-Western, 2002.Leader ignores or suppressescultural differenceCultural difference becomesan obstacle to performanceMonocultural TeamsMulticulturalTeamsMulticulturalTeamsLess More-- -- --- -++ +++ + ++Managing Diversity
    57. 57. Bottom Line ImpactsIncrease revenuesEmbracing diversity can help increase revenues by:• Attracting new customers and finding new markets• Building customer loyalty; retaining existing business• Expanding your global growth strategy• Improving success in crosscultural negotiations
    58. 58. Bottom Line ImpactsReduce costsFostering a diverse and inclusive environment will helpyour company reduce costs by;• Eliminating differential turnover across demographicgroups• Controlling relocation costs• Minimizing litigation costs
    59. 59. Bottom Line ImpactsIncrease ProductivityCultivating a diverse and inclusive work environmentensures that you get the most from your employees by:• Recruiting and retaining the top talent• Maximizing productivity through flexibility• Maximizing employee engagement – engaged employeesare more productive employees, go above and beyond,and experience less absenteeism.
    60. 60. WHAT IS THE CIDI?“Without inclusion, diversity really doesn’tmake a difference.”-Danyelle Granger
    61. 61. The CIDI MandateEducationConsultancyCommunityConnectorThink TankLegislativeSupportKnowledgeRepositoryMemberAssociation
    62. 62. CIDI EMPLOYER PARTNERS"Inclusion elevates all."- Elaine Hall
    63. 63. Current Employer Partners
    64. 64. “We all should know that diversity makes for arich tapestry, and we must understand that allthe threads of the tapestry are equal in valueno matter what their color.”-Maya Angelou
    65. 65. WHAT GETS MEASUREDGETS DONEHighlights from the ResearchFull report:http://www.cidi-icdi.ca/?page_id=1331“Hard metrics are vitally important, but we needboth qualitative and quantitative measures to tellthe full story of where an organization is on itsdiversity journey” – Mary-Frances Winters
    66. 66. Stages of Research1. Preliminary research and literature review2. Online Survey3. Interviews4. Writing
    67. 67. Website Review
    68. 68. Collecting Demographic Data52.9%
    69. 69. Employment Equity Requirements32.7%
    70. 70. Voluntarily Measuring Demographics20.2%
    71. 71. D&I is a Strategic Priority79.6%
    72. 72. Measuring Impact of D&I Programs18.8%
    73. 73. Using a Diversity Scorecard12.5%
    74. 74. Results of Using Diversity ScorecardRaised profile of D&I initiativesamong organizations’ leadership.Diversity Scorecard has becomepart of the organization’s overallstrategic reporting.
    75. 75. Results of Using Diversity ScorecardRaised profile of D&I initiativesamong organizations’ leadership.Diversity Scorecard has becomepart of the organization’s overallstrategic reporting.
    76. 76. Standard Measures of Inclusion:1. Representation2. Recruitment, promotion, and turnover3. Employee engagement4. Inclusiveness questions5. Human rights, harassment, or discrimination complaints6. Participation in training7. Participation in Employee Resource/Networking Groups
    77. 77. Going Beyond Basic MeasuresLeading vs. Lagging Indicators
    78. 78. AccountabilitySenior Leaders
    79. 79. AccountabilitySenior LeadersAll People Managers
    80. 80. AccountabilitySenior LeadersAll People ManagersAll Employees
    81. 81. Barriers and Roadblocks• Resources• Legal Objections• Personal / private info• Privacy / confidentiality
    82. 82. Successful Diversity Scorecards• Owned by the most senior leaders.• Top leader is accountable.• Top leader holds leadership teams accountable.• Leaders are involved in developing the scorecard.• Results are relevant to organization’s strategic goals.• Organization is ready.
    83. 83. Successful Diversity Scorecards• Wide range data available.• Leadership teams regularly review and understand thescorecard.• Leadership and managers understand their impact.• Communicated effectively and consistently.• Measures demonstrate efficacy and impact.Read the full report for complete details and the toolkit:http://www.cidi-icdi.ca/?page_id=1331
    84. 84. "Inclusion elevates all."- Elaine Hall
    85. 85. THANK YOUCathy Gallagher-LouisyDirector, Community Partnershipsand Knowledge Servicescathy.gallagherlouisy@cidi-icdi.cawww.cidi-icdi.caca.linkedin.com/in/cathygl@CatGL

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