A Network Mindset Practical Approaches to Everyday Networked and Collaborative Behaviors
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A Network Mindset Practical Approaches to Everyday Networked and Collaborative Behaviors

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Guest lecture at Columbia University, Information and Knowledge Strategy master's program residency, April 2014

Guest lecture at Columbia University, Information and Knowledge Strategy master's program residency, April 2014

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A Network Mindset Practical Approaches to Everyday Networked and Collaborative Behaviors A Network Mindset Practical Approaches to Everyday Networked and Collaborative Behaviors Presentation Transcript

  • A Network Mindset Practical Approaches to Everyday Networked and Collaborative Behaviors Guest lecture at graduate residency Information and Knowledge Strategy Masters program Columbia University, April 8-13, 2014 Catherine Shinners
  • 2 Perspective on identity Activate, expand one’s identity and contribution to the organizational network Social collaboration – working out loud Habitats of collaborative contexts Shutterstock/Milos Dizajn A network mindset
  • People are ‘situated’ Job title Job duties Assignments Reporting structure 3 Job title ‘grade level’ emphasis Obscured–active role, history, background, range of tacit knowledge, social capital Corporate Directory • Jane Doe • Program Manager • 3rd level down from VP of Supply Chain • Works in Los Angeles Shutterstock/vajuariel Emphasis on reporting-based ties Organizational identity Ways we are known inside organizations
  • 4 Construct, groom identity Network connections, awareness, growth Mobilize network Cultivate social, reputational capital • Sequential account of assigned roles • Your story about your roles • Education • Licensing • Samples of your work • Role-based recommendations • Affirmations of your posted content • Skills endorsements • Demonstrate quality, robustness of network Social-sharing • Comments, likes • Discussion forums • Metrics • Affiliations • Profile views • Prompted affirmations • Assess connection impact • Aggregated prompts via email • Search, research • Direct engagement • Outreach to network • Activate with purpose • Develop new connections • Re-invigorate Shutterstock/Milos Dizajn Professional networked identity
  • Rich profiles Assigned role – job position Photo (important in global companies) Claimed role - background, credentials Social role– member of communities, answers questions, reflects and writes (blog), shares quick insights (microblogs) expertise based on experience (tags), exposes work products Activities (posts, comments) Social feedback (comments, likes) Personal interests Links to external assets (LinkedIn profile, Twitter presence, blogs, websites) Develop connections to other employees (follow) 5 …and yet many people leave their profile on ‘mute’ New social tools in organizations
  • 6 Director of Corporate Social Responsibility Director of Governmental Affairs Prepares annual public CSR report Preparing vice president to accompany governor of state on international trade mission They both need to know about sustainability, labor and environmental practice in the company supply chain Expertise need Shutterstock:Cheryl Savan Shutterstock:hfng
  • 7 Manages the company’s supply chain sustainability processes • As she works in a complex, rapidly evolving domain, she updates her profile quarterly, describing the focus of work • blogs about key business challenges in supply chain sustainability, discusses where best practice and policy is headed with respect to suppliers • posts information about industry consortiums that she participates in • shares video recordings and presentation files from industry speaking engagements • tags her content, skills, expertise • links to her public facing presence – LinkedIn, Twitter • Her activity stream is rich with commentary and observations about her many trips to Asia-based suppliers (she’s in LA due to the frequency of travel to Asia) • She’s a member of the sustainability and innovation communities of interest/knowledge networks Meet Jane Doe From org chart to network agent Shutterstock:bikeriderlondo
  • profile 8 Form fill exercise • Connected, dynamic resource • Launch point for knowledge sharing, networking • Reflects multi-dimensional facets of roles, projects, experience • Talent discovery
  • 9 Transparent conversational flow of work Content awareness and accessibility Network- based group cohesion & connection Knowledge building • Robust profiles-greater context • Share updates (microblogs, comments, social feedback • Subscribe, contribute to, leverage discussion forums • Visibility of work expands knowledge base, invites diversity of inputs • Tacit knowledge more available as an artifact • Transparently co-create content • Social feedback (comments, likes) • Connect content to work dialogue tags, streams • Content change awareness via streams, alerts, filters, tags • Collective commentary *Bryce Williams, 2010 Working Out Loud Dynamics – Catherine Shinners Merced Group Social collaboration-dynamics of ‘working-out-loud’
  • 10 Transparent conversation al flow of work Content awareness and accessibilit y Network- based Group cohesion & connection Knowledge building Project content visible to stakeholders, contributors Project interactions in persistent stream Contributors set alerts, filters for project content - discussion forum notifications Team members with robust, rich profiles People presence- Project post or group area links to profiles of globally dispersed Interactive dynamics brings opportunity to elicit more tacit knowledge contributions Transparency yields rapid orientation, onboarding; without real-time meetings Project groups can collectively observe content contribution - avoids duplication, mis-timing Awareness of flow via content change or comment alerts, notifications Group, team members activate range of feedback, expressions, inputs, keep project momentum (likes, Network, social dimension of knowledge inputs visible Conversation, work stream becomes a project artifact, i.e., problem solving in context Project interaction, problem-solving, new ideas both collective an immediate Expand, integrate social graph around project Content linked with context Knowledge base builds for next project Spatial Temporal Visual Relational Informational Collaborative WOL practice–focus on projects, complex work processes
  • 11 Transparent conversation al flow of work Content awareness and accessibilit y Network- based Group cohesion & connection Knowledge building Global business advisory & deal assessment for large technical services organization Global team members connect with one another for expert information Contributors set alerts, filters for project content - discussion forum notifications Profiles, expertise detail highlighted in profiles Interactive dynamics brings opportunity to elicit more tacit knowledge contributions Project groups can collectively observe content contribution - avoids duplication, mis-timing Awareness of flow via content change or comment alerts, notifications Group, team members activate range of feedback, expressions, inputs, keep project momentum (likes, Network, social dimension of knowledge inputs visible Conversation, work stream becomes a project artifact, i.e., problem solving in context Project interaction, problem-solving, new ideas both collective an immediate Expand, integrate social graph around project Content linked with context Knowledge base builds for next project Spatial Temporal Visual Relational Informational Rapidly changing market conditions Collaborative WOL practice–focus on knowledge building
  • Community of Practice/Knowledge Network Shared knowledge, best practice, advance domain knowledge Team Collaboration Joint project work Artifact development Combine expertise, skills Network Collaboration Learnings, engagement within ecosystem Insight and influence Reporting-basedProjectorInterest-based role-based Inside organization Wider world Nature of ties Habitats of collaborative contexts
  • Palo Alto, CA +1-650-704-3889 catherineshinners@mercedgroup.com blog: collaboration-incontext.com www.mercedgroup.com http://about.me/catherineshinners www.linkedin.com/catherineshinners @catshinners Skype: CatherinePaloAlto Social Business Strategic Consulting and Enterprise 2.0 Services