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Wireless and VoIP Training Manual
Wireless and VoIP Training Manual
Wireless and VoIP Training Manual
Wireless and VoIP Training Manual
Wireless and VoIP Training Manual
Wireless and VoIP Training Manual
Wireless and VoIP Training Manual
Wireless and VoIP Training Manual
Wireless and VoIP Training Manual
Wireless and VoIP Training Manual
Wireless and VoIP Training Manual
Wireless and VoIP Training Manual
Wireless and VoIP Training Manual
Wireless and VoIP Training Manual
Wireless and VoIP Training Manual
Wireless and VoIP Training Manual
Wireless and VoIP Training Manual
Wireless and VoIP Training Manual
Wireless and VoIP Training Manual
Wireless and VoIP Training Manual
Wireless and VoIP Training Manual
Wireless and VoIP Training Manual
Wireless and VoIP Training Manual
Wireless and VoIP Training Manual
Wireless and VoIP Training Manual
Wireless and VoIP Training Manual
Wireless and VoIP Training Manual
Wireless and VoIP Training Manual
Wireless and VoIP Training Manual
Wireless and VoIP Training Manual
Wireless and VoIP Training Manual
Wireless and VoIP Training Manual
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Wireless and VoIP Training Manual

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  • 1. area system marc mapping field plotting cellular tower circuit sector ringback wireless testing ali ani regio p phase routing trunks emergency transfers phone voip wireline repair location coverage area m marc mapping field plotting cellular tower circuit sector ringback wireless testing ali ani region psap phase ro Public Safety Answering Point unks emergency transfers phone voip wireline repair location coverage area system marc mapping field plottin ar tower circuit sector ringback wireless testing ali ani region psap phase routing trunks emergency transfers p Wireless emergency VoIP voip and transfers phone wireline repair location coverage area system marc mapping field plotting cellular tower circuit sector ringback ess testing ali ani region psap phase routing trunks eline Training Manual repair location coverage area system marc mapping field plotting cellular tower circuit sector ringbac esstesting ali ani region psap phase routing trunks emergency transfers phone voip wireline location coverage area system marc mapping field plotting cellular tower circuit sector ringback wireless testin region psap phase routing trunks emergency transfers phone voip wireline repair location coverage area s marc mapping field plotting cellular tower circuit sector ringback wireless testing ali ani region p routing trunks emergency transfers phone voip wireline repair location coverage area system m ing field plotting cellular tower circuit sector ringback wireless testing ali ani region psap phase routing trunks gency transfers phone voip wireline repair location coverage area system marc mapping field plotting cellular to t sector ringback wireless testing ali ani region psap phase routing trunks emergency transfers phone voip wire location coverage area system marc mapping field plotting cellular tower circuit sector ringba ess testing ali ani region psap phase routing trunks emergency transfers phone voip wireline repair location c e area system marc mapping field plotting cellular tower circuit sector ringback wireless testing ali ani region phase routing trunks emergency transfers phone voip wireline repair location coverage area system marc mapp plotting cellular tower circuit sector ringback wireless testing ali ani region psap phase g trunks emergency transfers phone voip wireline repair location coverage area system marc mapping field plo ellular tower circuit sector ringback wireless testing ali ani region psap phase routing trunks emergency transfe e voip wireline repair location coverage area system marc mapping field plotting cellular tower circuit sector rin wireless testing ali ani region psap phase routing trunks emergency transfers phone voip wireline r r location coverage area system marc mapping field plotting cellular tower circuit sector ri wireless testing ali ani region psap phase routing trunks emergency transfers phone voip wireline repair locatio age area system marc mapping field plotting cellular tower circuit sector ringback wireless testing ali ani region phase routing trunks emergency transfers phone voip wireline repair location coverage area system marc mapp plotting cellular tower circuit sector ringback wireless testing ali ani region psap phase routing trunks emergen Provided by MARC’s Public Safety Communications Program ers phone voip wireline repair location coverage area system marc mapping field plotting cellular tower circuit commenco ringback wireless testing ali ani region psap phase routing trunks emergency transfers phone voip ne repair location coverage area system marc mapping field plotting cellular tower circuit sector ringback wire
  • 2. Table of Contents Introduction and Overview of Implementation ...................................................................1-3 PlantCML and GeoLynx Sample Screens for Phase I Wireless, Phase II Wireless, VoIP and Wireline Calls ............................................4-11 Emergency Services Numbers (ENS) for Wireless and VoIP ..................................................12 Guidelines for Minimum Response to Wireless 9-1-1 Calls .............................................13-15 Error Reporting Procedures and Sample Screens .............................................................16-17 Wireless Testing Guidelines.................................................................................................18 VoIP Testing Guidelines ......................................................................................................19 Emergency Support Contact Information ..............................................................................20 Frequently Asked Questions ...........................................................................................21-23 Glossary and Definitions ................................................................................................24-25 Test Questions .....................................................................................................................27
  • 3. Introduction The Mid-America Regional Council (MARC) serves as the association of city and county governments for the bistate Kansas City region. This region includes the following counties: • Cass • Johnson • Platte • Clay • Leavenworth • Ray • Jackson • Miami • Wyandotte MARC acts as the coordinating agency for the Kansas City Regional 9-1-1 System, which handles approximately 2 million emergency calls each year. MARC is the single point of contact for all telephone companies and wireless service providers that interconnect with the regional system and the 45 public safety answering points (PSAPs) operated by government agencies. MARC also coordinates the regional 9-1-1 GIS/mapping program, which provides each 9-1-1 agency with the ability to display an accurate street map of the region as 9-1-1 calls are received. Wireless 9-1-1 Calls 9-1-1 equipment in the region has been upgraded to accommodate wireless 9-1-1 features. This equipment upgrade permitted the Regional 9-1-1 System leadership to invoke FCC emergency number mandates on all wireless service providers that operate in the region. FCC regulations required all wireless service providers to offer Phase I and Phase II 9-1-1 services within specified time frames. Normally, enhanced wireless services are deployed in two phases. Our region chose to implement both Phase I and Phase II together. The following carriers operate within the MARC region: • AllTel • Sprint-Nextel • U.S. Cellular • AT&T Mobility • T-Mobile • Verizon • Cricket Collectively, these companies operate more than 5,200 wireless sectors in the Kansas City region. 1
  • 4. Overview of Implementation Wireless Phase I Wireless Phase I is the first step in providing better emergency response service to wireless 9-1-1 callers. With Phase I, a wireless 9-1-1 call comes into the PSAP with the wireless phone callback number, the address of the cellular tower, the specific tower sector (facing) the call accessed, and the type code of the mobile or wireless service provider of that cellular tower. When a Phase I call is received, the tower site and approximate sector coverage area will display on the GeoLynx map. This coverage area is an estimate. The actual location of the wireless 9-1-1 caller may be slightly outside the indicated area. Wireless Phase II Wireless Phase II provides even better emergency response service to wireless 9-1-1 callers. A wireless Phase II 9-1-1 call contains the wireless phone callback number and the approximate location of the wireless caller based on the X,Y (latitude and longitude) coordinates determined by the system at the time the caller hit “send” on his/her phone. The X,Y coordinate is an estimate. The actual location of the wireless 9-1-1 caller may not be exactly as indicated. Beginning in 2003, the Kansas City region implemented both Phase I and Phase II wireless 9-1-1 services. Wireless 9-1-1 Call Routing The Kansas City Regional 9-1-1 System installed redundant selective routers to process wireless 9-1-1 calls. These routers are expensive telephone switches installed at secure facilities in diverse areas of the region. Wireless service providers send their 9-1-1 calls to the selective router via a special telephone network. Once the wireless 9-1-1 call is received by a MARC selective router, it is sorted through a routing database and delivered to the appropriate PSAP. The appropriate PSAP is pre- determined based on the jurisdiction of the majority of the cellular sector coverage area. However, many cell sectors in the region cover multiple PSAP jurisdictions. Also, this coverage area is estimated; the actual location of the wireless 9-1-1 caller may be outside the indicated area. Wireless 9-1-1 Trunks Because the wireless and wireline 9-1-1 networks have been split in the Kansas City region, all wireless and VoIP 9-1-1 calls are received in the PSAP on separate 9-1-1 trunks from wireline calls. In the unlikely event of either wireless or wireline system failure, the other system should remain operational. This system also has the benefit of preventing calls about a major accident or other emergency reported by multiple wireless subscribers from jamming the entire 9-1-1 system. The number of wireless and wireline trunks at each PSAP is based on call volume and is closely monitored. 2 abc
  • 5. Voice over Internet Protocol Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) is a non-traditional type of phone service that uses the Internet to place telephone calls. While VoIP service providers are required by FCC regulation to connect to 9-1-1, this is a fairly new technology which requires a great deal of coordination. The MARC region currently has several VoIP providers connected through the wireless/VoIP network. These 9-1-1 calls are delivered via the existing wireless trunks. A call from a VoIP user will include the callback phone number and the self-registered address of the party. Testing MARC coordinates testing with all phone service providers for initial implementation and maintenance. Field testing verifies that calls made from each cell site and cell sector are routed correctly to the appropriate PSAP, the callback number is delivered and displayed correctly, the pANI (routing number) is received and displayed correctly, and the correct cell site/sector data is provided along with the call. Wireless testing is scheduled through MARC at least one to two business days in advance of the testing start time. MARC will notify the PSAP Manager of requested test schedules so that preparations can be made, if necessary. During the tests, PSAPs will receive calls from service provider technicians using a variety of phones including digital, local service, uninitialized, roaming, etc. The technician will verify the PSAP and ALI display. If at any point in the testing process a PSAP should become over burdened, testing may be temporarily suspended by notifying the technicians. PSAPs are responsible for contacting the technician as soon as testing can resume. Transfers Transfers to other PSAPs work basically the same as wireless, wireline and VoIP 9-1-1 calls, as long as the transfers are to PSAPs within the MARC region. Transfer buttons and speed dial lists are pre-programmed based on information provided by each PSAP. Transfer buttons for entities outside the MARC region may also be programmed. Star code lists are also made available for PSAPs within the region. Emergency Re-Routing (Wireless and Wireline) MARC’s Systems Operation Center (SOC) is the single point of contact for repair and maintenance issues involving the Regional 9-1-1 System. If at any time an agency needs to re-route 9-1-1 calls to a backup center or another PSAP (due to equipment failure, building evacuation, etc.), the MARC maintenance technicians should be contacted immediately (See page 20 for contact information). After regular business hours, this line rings Commenco for 24-hour PSAP service. def 3
  • 6. PlantCML and GeoLynx Sample Screens Phase I Wireless Call, PlantCML Screen Shot A Phase I 9-1-1 call may appear like this on a telecommunicator’s screen. Both the pANI (routing number) and CPN (calling party number) are listed. The cellular tower address and sector directional should appear in the address field. If X,Y coordinates are provided on a Phase I call, they represent the latitude and longitude of the tower, not the caller. 4 ghi
  • 7. Phase I Wireless Call Location, GeoLynx Screen Shot A Phase I call should display like this sample. The cell sector coverage area will be displayed on GeoLynx software. This represents the approximate coverage area at the time the caller pushed “send.” Subsequently, the caller could actually be located outside the displayed area at any time during the call. jkl 5
  • 8. Phase II Wireless Call, PlantCML Screen Shot A Phase II 9-1-1 call should appear like this. One difference between a Phase I and Phase II screen shot is that the X,Y coordinates displayed on a Phase II call are for the caller’s location, while for Phase I they are the tower location. The X,Y coordinates (latitude and longitude) give the “real world” coordinates rather than the general coverage area. Keep in mind that the location may not be exact and should be verified whenever possible. 6 mno
  • 9. Phase II Wireless Call Location, GeoLynx Screen Shot A Phase II call may be displayed like this sample. The caller’s location (indicated by the cell phone symbol) is more detailed than for a Phase I call. As long as the 9-1-1 call is active, a dispatcher may request ALI/retransmit ALI, or rebid to get updated location information on the PlantCML workstation. This could be very helpful, especially if the caller is traveling. (See Frequently Asked Questions section for directions on conducting a rebid.) pqrs 7
  • 10. VoIP Call, PlantCML Screen Shot VoIP calls look like a cross between wireless and wireline calls. The 9-1-1 calls are delivered over the wireless trunks, but have a stationary address. The biggest difference is that the type or class of service code shows VoIP. 8 tuv
  • 11. VoIP Call Location, GeoLynx Screen Shot The sample above illustrates how location information is currently displayed for a VoIP call. wxyz 9
  • 12. Wireline Call, PlantCML Screen Shot This PlantCML screen shot is an example of what PSAPs currently see displayed for wireline 9-1-1 calls. 10
  • 13. Wireline Call Location, GeoLynx Screen Shot Since the regional 9-1-1 map was initially developed to plot enhanced wireless 9-1-1 calls, many wireline calls would not plot accurately or at all. For this reason, the GeoLynx software was programmed to automatically display the location on wireless calls only. In 2008, functionality will be turned on to plot all types of 9-1-1 calls, including wireless, wireline and VoIP. MARC worked with local governments to correct address databases and improve map data so this function could be available. 11
  • 14. Emergency Service Numbers (ESNs) Public Safety Answering Point Wireless/VoIP ESN Each primary PSAP has been issued one ESN for Belton Police Department 238 wireless and VoIP calls. Blue Springs Police Department 239 These are necessary for Cass County Sheriff’s Office 231 routing the 9-1-1 calls. Clay County Sheriff’s Office 241 Claycomo Police Department 1009 These numbers are Excelsior Springs Police Department 1020 different from wireline Ft. Leavenworth Provost Marshall 1001 ESNs, and are issued Gladstone Public Safety 233 by PSAP rather than jurisdictional boundary. Grandview Police Department 236 Harrisonville Police Department 1002 Secondary PSAPs are Independence Police Department 251 not issued wireless/VoIP Jackson County Sheriff’s Office 1003 ESNs because calls are Johnson County Sheriff’s Office 249 transferred to them by a Kansas City, Missouri Police Department 232 primary PSAP. Leavenworth County Sheriff’s Office 252 Leavenworth Police Department 203 Leawood Police Department 250 Lee’s Summit Police Department 253 Lenexa Police Department 245 Liberty Police Department 237 Miami County Sheriff’s Office 1022 North Kansas City Police Department 234 Olathe Police Department 248 Overland Park Police Department 246 Platte County Sheriff’s Office 254 Pleasant Hill Police Department 1004 Pleasant Valley Police Department 1005 Prairie Village Police Department 244 Ray County 9-1-1 1006 Raymore Police Department 240 Raytown Police Department 235 Riverside Department of Public Safety 1007 Shawnee Police Department 247 Sugar Creek Police Department 1008 Unified Government/Wyandotte County 243 12
  • 15. Guidelines for Minimum Response to Wireless 9-1-1 Calls The Public Safety Communications Board adopted the following minimum response guidelines for wireless 9-1-1 calls for regional use. Some PSAPs may have established other procedures, and this document does not supersede policies or procedures currently in use. I. INTRODUCTION A. Purpose: The wireless enhancements to the regional 9-1-1 system provide additional features for the 9-1-1 personnel operating the system. Public safety agencies have developed these minimum guidelines for handling wireless 9-1-1 calls received with enhanced features. B. Applicability: The terms established by this guideline recommend operating procedures for PSAPs participating in the regional 9-1-1 system. This guideline is established and administered by the Public Safety Communications Board. C. Definitions: 1. Public Safety Communications Board: The policy board created by the Interlocal Cooperation Agreement signed by the participants in the Kansas City Regional 9-1-1 System, or any subcommittee of the policy board. 2. MARC: The Mid-America Regional Council. 3. MARC 9-1-1 service area: The nine-county Kansas City metropolitan area, composed of Cass, Clay, Jackson, Miami, Platte and Ray counties in Missouri, and Johnson, Leavenworth and Wyandotte counties in Kansas. 4. MARC 9-1-1 system: The network, database and customer-premises equipment owned and operated by MARC and/or the MARC 9-1-1 system participants and used to provide 9-1-1 service in the MARC 9-1-1 service area. 5. MARC 9-1-1 system participants: The governmental entities within the MARC 9-1-1 service area that contribute to the cost of the MARC 9-1-1 system or operate a PSAP cost-shared under the 9-1-1 Interlocal Cooperation Agreement. 6. PSAP: A public safety answering point, the location at which 9-1-1 calls are initially answered. 13
  • 16. 7. Phase I Wireless 9-1-1 Call: A wireless 9-1-1 call that is routed to a PSAP and includes the tower location and callback number identified by the system. 8. Phase II Wireless 9-1-1 Call: A wireless 9-1-1 call that is routed to a PSAP with the callback number and approximate caller location identified by the system. 9. Wireless 9-1-1 Disconnect: A wireless 9-1-1 call that is disconnected or one in which the caller hangs up before the 9-1-1 professional is able to ascertain any information. II. PHASE I WIRELESS 9-1-1 DISCONNECT A. Call Back. 9-1-1 personnel will attempt to call back a wireless telephone when a 9-1-1 call is routed to the PSAP and the call disconnects before personnel can adequately ascertain if assistance is needed. Personnel will call the number back once in an attempt to ascertain if assistance is needed. If the wireless phone is busy or there is no answer, additional attempts to contact the caller will not be made by communications personnel. If the call back attempt goes to voicemail, no message will be left. B. Contact. If contact is made with the 9-1-1 caller, 9-1-1 personnel will follow call-handling procedures established by the local agency to determine whether a public safety response is necessary. C. Indicated Emergency. Any evidence of an emergency situation will result in communications personnel initiating efforts to re-contact the caller to determine the nature of the incident and an accurate location for appropriate public safety response, according to procedures established by the local agency. Extraordinary attempts to locate a Phase I wireless 9-1-1 disconnect caller will only be made in the instance where an emergency is clearly indicated. III. PHASE II WIRELESS 9-1-1 DISCONNECT A. Call Back. 9-1-1 personnel will attempt to call back a wireless telephone when a 9-1-1 call is routed to the PSAP and the call disconnects before personnel can adequately ascertain if assistance is needed. Personnel will call the number back once in an attempt to ascertain if assistance is needed. If the wireless phone is busy or there is no answer, additional attempts to contact the caller will not be made by communications personnel. If the call back attempt goes to voicemail, no message will be left. B. Contact. If contact is made with the 9-1-1 caller, 9-1-1 personnel will follow call-handling procedures established by the local agency to determine whether a public safety response is necessary. C. Indicated Emergency. Any evidence of an emergency situation will result in communications personnel initiating efforts to re-contact the caller to determine the nature of the incident and an accurate location for the appropriate public safety response, 14
  • 17. according to procedures established by the local agency. If attempts to contact the 9-1-1 caller are unsuccessful, a field public safety response will be initiated based on the caller location provided by the 9-1-1 system. Extraordinary attempts to locate a Phase II wireless 9-1-1 disconnect caller will only be made in the instance where an emergency is clearly indicated. IV. 9-1-1 PERSONNEL DISCRETION A. Discretion. Communications personnel should pay close attention to background noise, tone and word choice of the caller as additional evidence to help determine the status of the 9-1-1 call. The time of day and location of the caller may provide additional clues to indicate whether a response is necessary. In any situation where the 9-1-1 professional believes an emergency situation may exist, an appropriate public safety response will be initiated. B. Cancellation. Communications personnel can disregard a wireless 9-1-1 call if there is evidence that the call is one of the following situations: 1. 9-1-1 Misdial. A call is classified as a 9-1-1 misdial when the caller stays on the line and admits to the misdial. 2. Unintentional 9-1-1 Call. A call is classified as unintentional when the 9-1-1 personnel can hear conversation, radio, etc. in the background and have listened sufficiently to determine that there are no sounds of an emergency situation. 3. Children playing on the phone or prank 9-1-1 calls. V. GUIDELINE MODIFICATIONS The Public Safety Communications Board may modify these guidelines and recommended procedures in accordance with their normal operating practices. 15
  • 18. Error Reporting Procedures ANI/ALI Errors The error reporting process has been designed to be as easy as possible for 9-1-1 personnel. An error should be reported to MARC each time there is a misrouted 9-1-1 call, a “No Record Found” result, incorrect ANI, incorrect ALI or incorrect/missing map data. The PlantCML equipment offers an ALI discrepancy form called Info Manager that will automatically populate the ALI fields received. The dispatcher should fill out all information needed to correct the error, as well as the calltaker’s name and contact information so that MARC staff can obtain additional information if needed. It is imperative that error reports be completed fully and submitted in a timely fashion and on every error so that data is corrected. Errors are e-mailed directly to MARC from each workstation by clicking on the envelope icon. These e-mails are sent through a closed network, not through ordinary e-mail servers. Users should not add any other e-mail addresses in either the “To” or “CC” lines, as this will cause an error message and delay the report. ALI Discrepancy Form 16
  • 19. GIS/Mapping Errors GeoLynx offers a GIS/Map error report form. This form should be used if a call does not plot accurately, a street is missing from the map data or a cell tower plots incorrectly or not at all. Again, this form can be e-mailed to MARC by selecting the “E-Mail” button at the bottom of the report form. Map Error Report 17
  • 20. MARC Wireless 9-1-1 Testing Guidelines October 2007 In preparation for wireless deployment, the Mid-America Regional Council (MARC) prepared guidelines for use by wireless service providers for Phase I and II testing. Two types of tests will be conducted by wireless service providers, but only one (field testing) will affect dispatchers. MARC is the point of contact through which wireless service providers request scheduling of field testing. If a wireless service provider contacts a PSAP directly to schedule testing, please advise them to contact MARC with the request. Scheduling and Notification System Testing: System testing occurs prior to any field testing, and is designed to test the different call scenarios and variables that may occur with wireless calls. This type of test also confirms that the wireless carrier’s mobile switching center (MSC) is routing correctly through the 9-1-1 selective router. Initial system testing should be scheduled through MARC Public Safety. Testing should be scheduled at least 72 hours in advance. Field Testing: Field testing, also known as drive testing, verifies that calls made from each cell site and cell sector are routed correctly to the designated PSAP, the callback number is delivered and displayed correctly and the correct cell site/sector data is provided along with the call. Wireless field testing should be scheduled through MARC on behalf of each PSAP. All scheduling is subject to the specific needs of each PSAP and each wireless service provider. The use of different types of phones is encouraged for field testing (local service, uninitialized, roaming, etc.) If at any point in the testing process a PSAP should become overburdened, testing may be suspended until notified by the PSAP or MARC to continue. All scheduling for field testing should be requested at least 72 hours before conducted. MARC will coordinate with Commenco and the PSAP(s) involved. Certification: Each wireless service provider is asked to provide a letter of certification to MARC upon the successful completion of testing in each county. It is expected that each wireless service provider will comply with accuracy standards mandated by the FCC. Contact Information MARC: Saralyn Hayes, (816) 701-8314 or shayes@marc.org Nikki Moss, (816) 701-8323 or nmoss@marc.org Commenco: Bill Holcomb, (816) 753-2166 or billh@commenco.com Brent Hathhorn, (816) 753-2166 or brent@commenco.com 18
  • 21. MARC VoIP 9-1-1 Testing Guidelines October 2007 In preparation for VoIP deployment, the Mid-America Regional Council (MARC) prepared guidelines for use by VoIP providers for implementation and maintenance testing. Scheduling and Notification System Testing: System testing occurs prior to any field testing and is designed to test the different call scenarios and variables that may occur with VoIP calls. This type of test also confirms that the VoIP (or third-party provider) switching center is routing correctly through the 9-1-1 selective routers. System testing should be scheduled through MARC Public Safety. Testing should be scheduled at least 72 hours in advance. Field Testing: Field testing verifies that calls made from each PSAP coverage area are routed correctly to the designated PSAP, and that the callback number and location are delivered and displayed correctly. All field testing should be scheduled through MARC on behalf of each PSAP. Scheduling is subject to the specific needs of each PSAP and provider. If at any point in the testing process a PSAP should become overburdened, testing may be suspended until notified by the PSAP or MARC to continue. All field testing should be scheduled at least 72 hours in advance. MARC will coordinate with technical services and the PSAP(s) involved. Certification: Each VoIP provider is asked to provide a letter of certification to MARC upon the successful completion of implementation testing in each county. It is expected that each VoIP provider will comply with all orders and rulings mandated by the FCC. Information: A spreadsheet will be provided to each carrier that includes 10-digit phone numbers for the PSAPs in case of a router failure, wireless/VoIP ESN listings, default PSAP listings, PSAP by county listings and wireless trunk information. Contact Information MARC: Saralyn Hayes, (816) 701-8314 or shayes@marc.org Nikki Moss, (816) 701-8323 or nmoss@marc.org Commenco: Bill Holcomb, (816) 753-2166 or billh@commenco.com Brent Hathhorn, (816) 753-2166 or brent@commenco.com 19
  • 22. Emergency Support Service Contacts SPECIAL CARRIER PURPOSE PHONE NUMBER INSTRUCTIONS Alltel Emergency 866-820-0429 option 1 AT&T Wireless Emergency 800-635-6840 option 4 (formerly Cingular) option 1, Cricket Communications Emergency 858-882-9301 must provide password Sprint-Nextel Emergency 888-877-7330 option 1 Verizon Emergency 800-451-5242 option 4 T-Mobile Emergency 973-292-8911 must listen to options US Cellular Emergency 630-875-8270 must listen to options PREPAID PROVIDERS Trac Phones Emergency 800-820-8632 option 1 Daytime 908-607-4119 Virgin Mobile option 6 After hours 866-868-6622 VOIP PROVIDERS AT&T Call Advantage Emergency 800-829-1011 option 9 Vonage Contact TCS 800-959-3749 option 1 THIRD PARTY PROVIDERS TCS for VoIP & Wireless Emergency 800-959-3749 option 1 Intrado for VoIP & Wireless Emergency 800-357-4911 OTHER IMPORTANT NUMBERS MARC Systems Operation 24/7 816-421-2911 Center (SOC) Commenco 24/7 816-753-2166 AT&T 9-1-1 Resolution Wireline 866-722-3911 Center Call Trace 20
  • 23. Frequently Asked Questions Q. During a wireless call, does the ringback feature work the same as a wireline call? A. Yes. Both the ringback and previous call feature will work the same with wireless, VoIP and wireline calls. Q. What do I do if a wireless 9-1-1 call comes in with garbled ANI/ALI? A. There will be no change in the way request ALI/retransmit ALI is done. As long as the 9-1-1 call is active, a request ALI function may be sent every 20 seconds. Q. What if a wireless service provider directly contacts my PSAP to schedule testing? A. Advise the carrier that all scheduling should be coordinated through MARC. MARC contact information is provided in this manual. Q. What if I start getting 9-1-1 calls across my 10-digit phone lines? A. This indicates that there has been some type of failure and the MARC Systems Operation Center (SOC) needs to be contacted immediately. SOC’s contact information is provided in this manual. Q. Do I look up previous calls the same way as wireline? A. Yes. Both the ringback and previous call features work the same with wireless, wireline and VoIP calls. Q. Why am I receiving errors when plotting wireline calls? A. This indicates the 9-1-1 database and map data are not in sync for this particular address and the error should be reported to MARC. This can be done using Info Manager from the PlantCML workstation, e-mail or fax. Q. Who do I contact if I have a concern about a 9-1-1 trunk or my 9-1-1 equipment not working properly? A. MARC has a maintenance department that takes service calls such as this. After-hours calls will automatically ring to Commenco. The phone number is 816-421-2911. For non-emergency situations, you may also e-mail 911techs@marc.org. Q. Will Phase I and II information locate on my CAD map? A. No, only GeoLynx contains cell tower data and can plot enhanced wireless calls. Q. If I need to call a cellular phone back, would I dial the pANI or CPN? A. The CPN is the “Calling Party Number” and would be the call back phone number. The ringback feature is the most time-efficient way to call back. Do not attempt to dial the pANI, which is a routing number used by service providers. 21
  • 24. Q. Can I request ALI on a 9-1-1 cellular call that is no longer active? A. No, the 9-1-1 call must be active to receive updated location information. If the call is disconnected and call back is unavailable, you may contact the service provider directly to inquire about the location of the caller. Q. Why would I request ALI (rebid) during a wireless 9-1-1 call? A. There are several reasons you may want to request ALI during a wireless 9-1-1 call: • If the initial 9-1-1 call came in as Phase I, you may request ALI to get updated Phase I information. This is helpful if the caller is traveling and may have moved to a different cell tower sector. The updated Phase I information will also display on GeoLynx. • If the initial 9-1-1 call came in as Phase I, you may request ALI and receive Phase II information. Some cellular phones delay in providing Phase II information, but it will be available upon request after approximately 20 seconds. As long as the 9-1-1 call is kept active, the dispatcher can request ALI every 20 seconds to get updated location information. The updated location information will also display on GeoLynx. • If the initial 9-1-1 call came in as Phase II, the dispatcher can request ALI after the call has been active for 20 seconds to get updated latitude and longitude information. This will also appear on GeoLynx. The dispatcher can then request ALI every 20 seconds to get updated location information. This is especially helpful if the caller is moving. Q. How do I rebid for updated location information? A. If the 9-1-1 call is still active, select the “request ALI” button on your Plant CML screen. A separate window will open. Select “request ALI” from the window. Thinking bars will scroll across the screen. Select “keep” which will close the window and re-populate the ALI with updated location information. Q. Can I rebid if a 9-1-1 call is no longer active? A. A rebid or request ALI can be completed on landline calls if the call is no longer active, but wireless and true VoIP calls must be active to conduct a rebid. This is because the caller’s location could be moving and therefore the location would not be valid. Q. Why do I get Phase I information on some calls and Phase II on others? A. The solution the wireless carrier has chosen and the type of phone the caller is using could determine what information the PSAP will receive. As accuracy progresses, more calls will plot Phase II information in a more timely manner. Q. What do I do if a wireless 9-1-1 call is misrouted or the ANI/ALI is incorrect? A. Fill out an error report form and submit it to MARC via the electronic process explained earlier in this manual to ensure the issue is addressed and corrected. 22
  • 25. Q. What if I receive a 9-1-1 cellular call that should have been delivered to a different PSAP? A. Some transferring will still be required. Transfers will be conducted the same way for wireless calls as they are for wireline calls. If the caller is a significant distance from the PSAP, fill out an error report indicating where the call should have been routed to. Q. Are dispatchers involved in 9-1-1 test calls? A. Yes. MARC will schedule the testing, but dispatchers will be answering 9-1-1 test calls and providing information to the service providers. Q. What if I have a wireless callback phone number but no location, and the call is disconnected? A. First, attempt to call the phone number back. During a Phase I and II call, you will receive the calling party’s phone number. If that is not successful, contact the wireless service provider, as they may be able to provide location information. Contact information and instructions for each wireless service provider are included in this manual. (For the most recently updated contact information, visit www.marc.org/ publicsafety/wireless-service-numbers.pdf) Remember to report this to MARC as an error for further investigation. Q. Why do some VoIP 9-1-1 calls look like wireline and others like wireless? A. True VoIP calls have a Class of Service or Type code of VOIP. Some companies sell their service as VoIP, but send 9-1-1 calls through the landline network. These calls will have a Class of Service the same as landline. Most of these companies are registered through the state utility commission as a service provider. Q. Why do some 9-1-1 calls have a callback number with “911” as the area code and why can’t I call these numbers back? A. A 9-1-1 call that has “911” as the area code typically indicates that the caller is using a cell phone that has been disconnected or the SIM card removed. No active service is associated with the phone, therefore; a generic phone number is listed which is actually part of the serial number of the phone used. The FCC mandates all cell phones have the ability to call 9-1-1 whether active or not, so they may call 9-1-1, but not have the ability to receive incoming calls. 23
  • 26. Glossary and Commonly Used Terms ALI (Automatic Location Identification): A record displayed automatically at an answering position indicating the location corresponding to the caller telephone number. The ALI record may also indicate the ESN, the X,Y coordinates and other pertinent information associated with the caller’s location. ALI Circuit: Dedicated telephone lines that ALI information travels through to the PSAP. ANI (Automatic Number Identification): The telephone number of the 9-1-1 caller. CAD (Computer-Aided Dispatch): A computer-based system that aids PSAP attendants by automating selected dispatching and record keeping activities. CAD systems are connected to the 9-1-1 equipment that allows ANI and ALI to “spill” into the CAD. Cellular Phone: Wireless device used to call other wireline or wireless devices, including 9-1-1. Cell Tower: Wireless telecommunications antenna serving a specific geographic area. Cell Tower Sector: Also known as the face of cell tower. Each sector operates independently of others and is uniquely identifiable. Commenco: Local project manager of 9-1-1 equipment installation and maintenance. CPN (Calling Party Number): Also known as ANI. CPU: Computer Processing Unit. E9-1-1: An enhanced service that provides selective routing, ANI and ALI. ESN (Emergency Service Number): A three- to five-digit number that tells the switch how to route 9-1-1 calls. For wireline calls, unique ESNs are assigned to each community’s police, fire and EMS responders. Wireless and VoIP ESNs are assigned by PSAP. FCC (Federal Communications Commission): An independent U.S. government agency, directly responsible to Congress. The FCC is charged with regulating interstate and international communications by radio, television, wire, satellite and cable. GeoLynx: Mapping software installed in regional 9-1-1 systems. Displays location of map data. GIS (Geographic Information Systems): A computer technology that combines geographic data and other types of information to generate visual maps and reports. 24
  • 27. Lat/Long (latitude/longitude): Also known as the X,Y coordinates. Relating to angular distance to earth’s surface, they are used to determine location during a Phase II call. MARC (Mid-America Regional Council): The association of local governments and metropolitan planning organization that serves as facilitator of the regional 9-1-1 system. MSC (Mobile Switching Center): Equipment owned and maintained by the wireless carrier. Wireless calls go into the MSC before being sent through dedicated trunks to the selective router and on to a PSAP. pANI (pseudo Automatic Number Identification): This is a nondialable routing number used to support routing of wireless 9-1-1 calls. It identifies the particular cell sector from which the call originates. Phase I: The delivery of a wireless 9-1-1 call with callback number and identification of the cell-sector from which the call originated. Phase II: The delivery of a wireless 9-1-1 call with Phase I requirements plus location of the caller using the latitude/longitude coordinates where the caller selected “send.” PlantCML: Manufacturer of the regional 9-1-1 equipment. PSAP (Public Safety Answering Point): Facility equipped and staffed to receive 9-1-1 calls. A primary PSAP receives an initial 9-1-1 call. Secondary PSAPs do not receive initial 9-1-1 calls, but will have 9-1-1 calls transferred to them. Ringback: With a single touch of the screen, the dispatcher can automatically reestablish a communication channel with a caller. Selective Routing: The routing of a 9-1-1 call to the proper PSAP based upon the location of the caller. Selective routing is controlled by the ESN which is derived from the callers location. Transfer: The ability to send a 9-1-1 call back through the selective router and to a different PSAP. Trunk (9-1-1): Dedicated telephone lines from the selective router to the PSAP. These lines carry a higher restoration priority than regular lines, in case of failure. VoIP (Voice over Internet Protocol): Technology that allows voice calls using an internet connection instead of traditional phone lines. Wireless Service Provider: Also known as wireless carrier. Company that provides cellular service. 25
  • 28. 26
  • 29. Test Questions 1. A CAD map will display the same 7. An error report form should be wireless location information as GeoLynx completed and submitted to MARC software. every time there is a misroute, incorrect True False ANI or ALI or No Record Found. True False 2. All 9-1-1 testing will be coordinated through MARC. 8. Why would a dispatcher request ALI True False during a wireless 9-1-1 call? A) get updated Phase I information 3. What is a CPN? B) get updated Phase II information A) routing number C) move call from Phase I to Phase II B) calling party number D) all the above C) medical term D) name of wireless provider 9. A pANI is a dialable phone number. True False 4. A wireless 9-1-1 call will always have Phase II information. 10. Phase I wireless will provide what information to the 9-1-1 call taker? True False A) Calling Party Number 5. 9-1-1 personnel will be asked to provide B) cell tower address and sector information to service providers during facing 9-1-1 testing. C) approximate coverage area of cell sector True False D all of the above 6. Who is the first point of contact for all 9-1-1 outages, malfunctions, trunk and CPU issues? A) Commenco B) the phone company C) MARC SOC D) GeoComm Name: ______________________________ Agency: __________________________________ Agency Address: ________________________________________________________________ Phone: ______________________________ E-mail: __________________________________ This manual is certified with the State of Missouri for telecommunicator training hours. Please complete and return a copy of this test to: MARC, Regional 9-1-1 Program, 600 Broadway Suite 200, Kansas City, MO 64105 27
  • 30. 600 Broadway, Suite 200 • Kansas City, MO 64105 • Phone 816-474-4240 • www.marc.org/publicsafety

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