Reading Strategies -  A Concrete Approach Carrie Weaknecht Wilkes University November 2011 Based on ideas retrieved from  ...
Setting the Foundation: <ul><li>Students must first understand metacognition (thinking about our own </li></ul><ul><li>thi...
Strategy #1: Schema <ul><li>Encourage students to make connections to personal schema (prior knowledge). </li></ul><ul><ul...
Strategy #2: Inferring <ul><li>Schema + Text evidence = Solid inference </li></ul><ul><li>Begin with concrete ideas about ...
Strategy #3: Questioning <ul><li>Encourage curiosity in your students. </li></ul><ul><li>Provide “Thinking Stems” to get t...
Strategy #4:  Determining Importance <ul><li>Filter text for valuable information. </li></ul><ul><li>Activity: Pour a pot ...
Strategy #5: Visualizing <ul><li>Create mental or sensory images when you read. </li></ul><ul><li>Activity:  Read aloud or...
Strategy #6: Synthesizing <ul><li>Expand original thoughts as we encounter new information. </li></ul><ul><li>Activity: Us...
Citations <ul><li>McGregor, T. (2007).  Comprehension connections: Bridges to strategic reading.  Portsmouth, NH.  Heinema...
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Reading strategies

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Reading strategies

  1. 1. Reading Strategies - A Concrete Approach Carrie Weaknecht Wilkes University November 2011 Based on ideas retrieved from Comprehension Connections by Tanny McGregor.
  2. 2. Setting the Foundation: <ul><li>Students must first understand metacognition (thinking about our own </li></ul><ul><li>thinking; monitoring our own thoughts) </li></ul><ul><li>Activity: Model metacognitive reading with a read aloud and create a “Reading Salad” </li></ul><ul><li>Text + Thinking = Real Reading </li></ul>
  3. 3. Strategy #1: Schema <ul><li>Encourage students to make connections to personal schema (prior knowledge). </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Text-to-self </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Text-to-text </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Text-to-world </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Activity: Write down some experiences, thoughts, feelings on bits of paper. Use a lint roller to represent your brain as it rolls up your unique schema. Tear off your individual Schema Sheet. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Strategy #2: Inferring <ul><li>Schema + Text evidence = Solid inference </li></ul><ul><li>Begin with concrete ideas about inferring. </li></ul><ul><li>Activity: “Who wears these slippers?” Show students a pair of slippers. Have them make inferences about the owner, </li></ul><ul><li>citing evidence. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Strategy #3: Questioning <ul><li>Encourage curiosity in your students. </li></ul><ul><li>Provide “Thinking Stems” to get them started. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>I wonder… </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What if… </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Why… </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How could… </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Activity: Bring in an object of personal significance. Let the students generate questions about its meaning. Reveal bits of information each day. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Strategy #4: Determining Importance <ul><li>Filter text for valuable information. </li></ul><ul><li>Activity: Pour a pot of water and cooked spaghetti through a strainer. Lift the strainer and tell students this is how our brains work when we read. </li></ul><ul><li>Ask them to figure out how </li></ul><ul><li>the experiment shows this. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Strategy #5: Visualizing <ul><li>Create mental or sensory images when you read. </li></ul><ul><li>Activity: Read aloud or </li></ul><ul><li>play music while students </li></ul><ul><li>sketch what they “see” </li></ul><ul><li>or feel. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Strategy #6: Synthesizing <ul><li>Expand original thoughts as we encounter new information. </li></ul><ul><li>Activity: Use nesting dolls set out in ascending order to represent how thinking changes and grows. </li></ul>
  9. 9. Citations <ul><li>McGregor, T. (2007). Comprehension connections: Bridges to strategic reading. Portsmouth, NH. Heinemann. </li></ul><ul><li>Schema image – Retrieved from http://www.flickr.com/photos/8331761@N07/2502131903/ </li></ul><ul><li>Inferring image – Retrieved from http://www.flickr.com/photos/sk8geek/4465813974/ </li></ul><ul><li>Questioning image – Retrieved from http://www.flickr.com/photos/dumbledad/4988915427/ </li></ul><ul><li>Determining Importance image – Retrieved from http://www.flickr.com/photos/daviderickson/2386739301/ </li></ul><ul><li>Visualizing image – Retrieved from http://www.flickr.com/photos/shrimphead/3861398003/in/photostream/ </li></ul><ul><li>Synthesizing image – Retrieved from http://www.flickr.com/photos/cayetano/3351617200/in/photostream/ </li></ul>

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