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10 reasons  against waitrose malmesbury on the avon mills site
10 reasons  against waitrose malmesbury on the avon mills site
10 reasons  against waitrose malmesbury on the avon mills site
10 reasons  against waitrose malmesbury on the avon mills site
10 reasons  against waitrose malmesbury on the avon mills site
10 reasons  against waitrose malmesbury on the avon mills site
10 reasons  against waitrose malmesbury on the avon mills site
10 reasons  against waitrose malmesbury on the avon mills site
10 reasons  against waitrose malmesbury on the avon mills site
10 reasons  against waitrose malmesbury on the avon mills site
10 reasons  against waitrose malmesbury on the avon mills site
10 reasons  against waitrose malmesbury on the avon mills site
10 reasons  against waitrose malmesbury on the avon mills site
10 reasons  against waitrose malmesbury on the avon mills site
10 reasons  against waitrose malmesbury on the avon mills site
10 reasons  against waitrose malmesbury on the avon mills site
10 reasons  against waitrose malmesbury on the avon mills site
10 reasons  against waitrose malmesbury on the avon mills site
10 reasons  against waitrose malmesbury on the avon mills site
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10 reasons against waitrose malmesbury on the avon mills site

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10 reason why we should not have a Waitrose on this Malmesbury field. Greenfield Campaign.

10 reason why we should not have a Waitrose on this Malmesbury field. Greenfield Campaign.

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  • 1. 10  reasons  why  we  should  not  have  a    Waitrose  on  this  Malmesbury  field  View  of  Malmesbury  and  Avon  Mills  field  and  Silk  Mills  ©  Jeremy  Moore  2013    And    some  quesBons    Waitrose  have  yet  to  answer  
  • 2. 1.  The  field  is  part  of  our  heritage  daBng  back  1000+  years,  and  in  the  Malmesbury  ConservaBon  Area,  first  designated  1973  “English  Heritage  has  submiPed  formal  comments  to  the  Council  and  advised  that  in  accordance  with  the  policy  provisions  of  the  NPPF  the  allocaBon  of  the  site  for  such  development  will  in  principle  cause  substanBal  harm  to  the  conservaBon  area  and  the  seTng  of  listed  buildings  as  designated  heritage  assets.    In  accordance  with  policy  133  of  the  NPPF  such  harm  should  be  excepBonal,  must  be  outweighed  by  substanBal  public  benefits,  and  is  necessary  to  achieve  them.”      David  Stuart,  English  Heritage,  Le5er  to  Malmesbury  Neighbourhood  Steering  Group,  April  2013  Source  of  images:  Malmesbury  ConservaBon  Area  Appraisal  2007    
  • 3. Two  leading  historians  agree  this  is  wrong                “  I  heard  about  the  Waitrose  development  when  we  were  filming  our  Aethelstan  programme  for  the  BBC  last  year  and  I  never  dreamed  it  would  be  passed  on  a  historic  site  so  close  to  the  town.    As  someone  who  has  been  visiBng  the  town  for  40  years,  and  who  has  wriPen  about  its  role  in  history,  and  made  films  here  -­‐  the  most  recent  soon  to  be  shown  on  the  BBC  -­‐  I  am  astonished  that  the  planners  could  even  consider  giving  the  site  by  Avon  Silk  Mills  over  to  a  supermarket  development.  “      Michael  Wood  is  a  historian,  TV  presenter  and  expert  on  Æthelstan.  He  is  the  Professor  of  Public  History  at  the  University  of  Manchester.  His  recent  BBC  TV  series  include  The  Great  BriBsh  Story:  A  People’s  History  and  The  Story  of  England.  He  is  author  of  The  Story  of  England  (Viking)  and  In  Search  of  the  Dark  Ages  (BBC  Books).                “This  proposal  threatens  to  damage  Malmesbury  environmentally  and  aestheBcally,  by  disrupBng  an  important  conservaBon  area  and  destroying  the  visual  appearance  of  the  town  for  locals  and  the  vista  seen  by  travellers  arriving  from  the  south  and  east  to  enter  over  the  old  town  bridge.  “                “Malmesburys  long  and  disBnguished  history  makes  this  an  important  site  for  visitors  interested  in  the  early  history  of  Wiltshire,  medieval  monasBcism  and  in  the  origins  of  the  kingdom  of  England.  This  planned  supermarket  threatens  permanently  to  destroy  a  crucial  part  of  that  heritage.”                  Sarah  Foot  is  Regius  Professor  of  EcclesiasBcal  History  at  Oxford  University,  and  an  expert  on  early  medieval  history.  She  is  author  of  Æthelstan:  the  First  English  Monarch  (Yale  University  Press).  
  • 4. 2.  The  field  is  a  buffer  between  the  historic  town  and  the  bypass                  “The  foodstore  bulk,  its  service  yard,  earth  berms  and  extensive  customer  car  parking  will  create  a  significant  visual  and  physical  barrier,  and  break  in  the  ring  of  ‘green’  landscape  around  the  base  of  the  historic  town…”  Brian  Johnson,  Urban  Designer,  Wiltshire  Council              “The  current  integrity  of  this  green  ring,  which  has  survived  from  Saxon  Bmes,  can  clearly  be  seen  in  Fig.14  of  the  Malmesbury  ConservaBon  Area  Appraisal.    These  green  river  valleys  and  adjoining  open  green/agricultural  land  are  an  essenBal  component  of  the  character  and  seTng  of  the  town,  compleBng  a  scene  within  which  the  town  can  be  seen  and  a  backdrop  when  looking  to  the  countryside  beyond.    I  would  have  fundamental  concerns  about  any  urbanized  development,  with  building,  extensive  remodeling  of  the  terrain,  lighBng  and  large  areas  of  hard  standing  on  this  very  historic  site,  development  of  which  would  represent  a  huge  sacrifice  of  over  1000  years  of  history,  which  once  lost  can  never  be  regained  for  future  generaBons  (PPS  5  policy  HE9.1).  “                Sarah  Gostling,  Senior  ConservaIon  Officer,  Wiltshire  Council  
  • 5. We  have  superimposed  the  Waitrose  plan  onto  Google  maps.  This  is  to  scale,  and  you  can  see  the  site    in  proporBon  in  the  Malmesbury  ConservaBon  Area.    
  • 6.              “..the  field  is  an  integral  part  of  the  ‘green’  landscape  wrapping  around  the  historic  town  which  rises  steeply  up  from  the  riverside  onto  the  plateau.  …  This  is  the  defining  element  of  the  unique  and  dramaBc  seTng  from  which  the  fundamental  character,  idenBty  and  history  of  the  town  as  an  elevated  medieval  defensive  sePlement  is  drawn.  …  the  loss  of  the  field  to  development  (let  alone  on  the  scale  proposed)  will  undermine  the  completeness  of  this  valued  and  cherished  seTng”                    Brian  Johnson  Dip  Arch  RIBA,  Urban  Designer,                      Wiltshire    Council              The  locaBon,  scale,  form  and  type  of  development  currently  being  proposed  will  in  my  opinion  result  in  permanent  and  irreversible  harm  to  the  quality  of  the  towns  seTng  and  the  character  of  the  conservaBon  Area,  which  will  far  exceed  the  ‘benefit’  that  it  aPempts  to  deliver.  The  proposed  development  permanently  harms  the  long  held  historic  integrity  and  cultural  legacy  of  the  town,  it  damages  much  more  than  visual  quality  and  views  from  within  and  from  outside  the  ConservaBon  Area,  it  will  destroy  the  drama  and  wider  appreciaBon  of  townscape  panorama  from  the  south  east  and  east.  GranBng  consent  for  this  development  would  in  my  opinion  represent  the  Bpping  point  &  moment  in  history  where  the  seTng  for  Malmesbury  and  the  relaBonship  between  the  historic  core  of  the  town,  its  seTng  within  the  local  landscape,  and  the  integrity  of  the  ConservaBon  Area  to  the  south  of  the  town  was  lost  forever.                          Mark  Goodwin,  CMLI,  Landscape  Architect,                        Wiltshire  Council      Photos  from  Brian  Johnson  Report  
  • 7. 3.  It’s    been  in  conBnuous  agricultural  use  for  the  past  few  hundred  years.  There  are  signs  of  farming  in  archaeological  remains  daBng  back  to  1BC    ©Neil  Bryars  2013  
  • 8. 4.  It’s  an  out  of  town  site            The  distance  from  the  entrance  of  the  site  is  well  over  300m  from  the  first  shop  in  Malmesbury  High  Street,  add  59  steps  for  the  proposed  pedestrian  exit  nearest  the  town,  or  add  80m  for  the  sloping  ramp  exit.  Anyone  making  a  “linked  trip”  will  have  to  walk  up  a  steep  hill.  It’s  great  exercise,  but  we  doubt  many  Waitrose  shoppers  will  do  it  -­‐  these  pictures  come  from  Google  Street  View.  1.  59  steps  down  to  the  road  from  the  right,  cross  over  new  pelican  crossing.  Then  across  the  footbridge.  2.  Come  through  gate  on  the  lep.  3.  Next,  up  the  hill,  along  narrow  pavements    4.  Nearly  there,  the  shops  start  at  the  top  of  this  photo.      
  • 9. 5.  This  view  will  be  ruined  View  from  car  park  behind  town  library    
  • 10. “The  proposed  development  …  damages  much  more  than  visual  quality  and  views  from  within  and  from  outside  the  ConservaBon  Area,  it  will  destroy  the  drama  and  wider  appreciaBon  of  townscape  panorama  from  the  south  east  and  east.”      Mark  Goodwin,  Wiltshire  Council  And  all  this  would  all  be  paved  over    
  • 11. 6.  It  will  ruin  the  “seTng”  of  the  iconic  Grade  II  Listed  Silk  Mills,  neighbouring  listed  buildings,  and  access  to  Malmesbury  over  the  Town  Bridge  
  • 12. The  earliest  known  mill  on  this  site  was  Schotesbure  Mill  in  the  13th  century,  the  current  Grade  II  Listed  building  was  built  in  1791  and    listed  in  1951.    It  is  an  important  landmark  in  Malmesbury,  and  its  size  and  locaBon  make  it  a  popular  feature  of  tourist  walks  and  photographs,  postcards  and  even  a  tea  towel.    The  Silk  Mills  have  their  own  display  in  the  town’s  Athelstan  Museum  and  light  up  in  the  town  model  display  Athelstan  Museum  website  
  • 13. 7.  There  is  no  mandate    from  the  people  of  Malmesbury  and  neighbouring  villages  for  this  applicaBon  •  Of  327  responses  to  the  Waitrose  applicaBon  in  2012,  in  favour  97,  against  189  •  120+  named  individuals  voted  against  the  Waitrose  applicaBon    in  a  recent  online  peBBon,  41  people  signed  a  peBBon  in  favour  in  2012.  •  Only  42%  of  the  346  individual  respondents  were  in  favour  of  the  overall  drap  Neighbourhood  Plan,  169  responses  supported  the  supermarket  applicaBon.    •  Compare  this  to  703  who  returned  the  housing  and  supermarket  quesBonnaire  (did  not  include  quesBons  about  specific  supermarket  sites).  Although  70%  think  Malmesbury  needs  a  new  supermarket,  only  42%  would  support  a  store  if  it  had  a  negaBve  impact  on  the  High  Street.  •  By  contrast,  over  2000  local  residents  signed  a  peBBon  in  favour  of    Tesco  Marlborough  in  response  to  a  local  campaign  “Marborough  MaPers”          www.thisiswiltshire.co.uk/news/8873200.dreams_come_true_on_marlborough_store          Even  with  the  “berms”  and  trees  we  can  sBll  see  the  building!    Source  hPp://goo.gl/dkwaf      
  • 14. 8.  Residents  have  been  misled  by  poor  data  analysis,  with  a  drap  Neighbourhood  plan    based    an  unconvenBonal  scoring  system            “Malmesbury  Neighbourhood  Steering  Group  (MNSG)  have  used  a  bespoke,  unconvenBonal  scoring  system  copyrighted  by  leading  members  of  MNSG.  Unlike  convenBonal  schemes  adopted  by  Wilts  Council  in  developing  its  Core  Strategy  and  all  other  Neighbourhood  Plan  developments  we  have  found,  the  MNSG  system  mathemaBcally  distorts  the  differences  between  the  various  opBons  being  considered.”    Professor  Jeff  Hand,  Resident  of  Outer  Silk  Mills    See  also  hPp://goo.gl/hNbbi        31  responses    to  the  draP  Neighbourhood  Plan  included  criIcism  of  the  scoring  system:    “I  find    the  scoring  for  pedestrian,  public  transport  and  cycling  very  biased  towards    the  Waitrose  applicaBon  “  Comment  383    “The  scoring  or  "criterion  weighBng"  system  is  too    complicated  and  inadequately  explained.”          Comment  342    “The  selected  sites  seem  to  have  been  subjecBvely  idenBfied  some  Bme  ago,  with  the  criteria  and  scoring  system    designed  to  support  their  selecBon.  “  Comment  283    “Goal  posts  have  been  moved  in  order  to  promote  the  potenBal  building  sites  and  supermarket  of  choice,  in  as  much  as    the  scoring  system  for  the  various  sites  has  been  inflated  or  deflated  in  a  shameless  fashion  depending  on  what  suits  the  MNSGs  objecBves.”      Comment  281  
  • 15.        "I  think  a  lot  of  it  is  shopkeepers  knowing  they  dont  want  Sainsburys,  so  saying  they  support  Waitrose  because  they  think  that  wont  be  as  bad.  I  dont  want  either.  I  wouldnt  want  the  Waitrose  plan.  Itll  also  be  a  click  and  collect  point  for  John  Lewis,  and  that  will  have  an  impact  on  everyone.”    HJ  Knees  quoted  in  Western  Daily  Press,  6  June  2013                25%  of  John  Lewis’s  business  is  now  online,  25%  of  purchases  are  collected  from  John  Lewis  and  Waitrose  stores,  with  growth  in  online  sales  for  John  Lewis/Waitrose  in  2012/13  was  41%.    Source  GazePe  &  Herald  The  biggest  store  in  Malmesbury  is  family-­‐run  department  store  HJ  Knees.    11%  of  the  respondents  to  the  Malmesbury  supermarket  survey  already  shop  for  groceries  online.  Those  arguing  for  for  the  economic  benefits  of  this  applicaBon  have  failed  to    consider  the  huge  growth  of  online  shopping.  Much  of  the  evidence  used  to  support  the  argument  for  another  supermarket  comes  from  reports  by  consultants  GVA  commissioned  by  Wilts  Council.      The  consultants  are  equivocal  in  their  recommendaBons,  and  actually  state  “..  there  is  no  clearly  defined  quanBtaBve  need  for  the  scale  of  retailing  proposed”.  
  • 16. 9.  There  are  alternaBves,  there  is  no  need  for  us  to  rush  into  a  bad  decision    We  could  extend  the  Gloucester  Road  Co-­‐op  (Co-­‐op  won’t  do  this  because  the  anB  flooding  measures  make  this  too  costly  for  them,  but  another  chain  might),  or  build  on  StaBon  Yard,  by  re-­‐developing  one  or  more  industrial  units.  Waitrose  &  Sainsbury’s  argue  the  laPer  is  too  difficult,  but  they  have  a  vested  interest  in  their  current  applicaBons.              “You  appear  to  have  opted  for  the  Silk  Mills  site  simply  because  that  is  one  of  the  two  planning  applicaBons  currently  before  the  Unitary  Council…  a  curious  way  of  planning  the  strategic  future  of  the  town.  Surely  it  would  be  bePer  to  decide  where  you  want  the  supermarket,  even  if  there  are  no  current  plans  lodged  for  it?  …  I  would  alternaBvely  much  prefer  to  see  a  Waitrose  development  in  the  High  Street.  That  of  course  would  be  expensive  and  inconvenient  for  Waitrose,  but  it  would  preserve  the  vibrancy  of  the  High  Street,  which  despite  their  protestaBons  to  the  contrary  the  Silk  Mills  site  would  not.”  James  Gray,  MP    Many  people  are  impaBent  for  more  consumer  choice,  simply  because  one  chain,  Co-­‐op,  owns  both  Malmesbury  stores  and  they  are  not  very  good.  A  change  of  ownership,  improvements  to  the  exisBng  stores,  maybe  another  convenience  store  on  the  High  Street  would  solve  this.      The  most  recent  Wiltshire  Retail  Study  idenBfies  a  potenBal  need  for  an  addiBonal  209  sq  metres  of  retail  space  in  Malmesbury.  This  versus  the  1,672  sq  metres  of  retail  space  proposed.  We  don’t  need  more  parking  either,  Wiltshire  Council  stats  say  that  the  Cross  Hayes  Car  Park  runs  at  average  of  78%  occupancy  and  the  StaBon  Road  car  park  at  less  than  20%.  
  • 17. 10.  It  would  be  wrong  to  pre-­‐empt  the  Malmesbury  Neighbourhood  Plan  •  It  will  only  take  unBl  November  for  the  process  to  be  completed.    •  The  responses  to  the  recent  consultaBon  exercise  contain  tens  of  thousands  of  words  of  important  ideas  and  opinions:          “…many  people  now  use  internet  shopping  so  having  a  major  store  within  5  miles  is  not  essenBal.    Even  the  big  4  food  retailers  recognise  that  major  edge  of  town  sites  are  not  the  way  forward  and  they  are  all  pushing  for  high  street  presence.”  Response  195          “A  supermarket  either  Sainsbury  or  Waitrose  would  lead  to  the  DEATH  OF  THE  HIGH  STREET.”  Response  184    
  • 18. QuesBons  Waitrose  sBll  need  to  answer  •  Why  haven’t  we  seen    computer  generated  3D  representaBons  of  views  of  the  supermarket  site,  level  with  the  second  floor  of  the  Outer  Silk  Mill?  (see  red  line)        •  How’s  the  pedestrian  access  going  to  work?  Waitrose  propose  a  ramp  near  the  roundabout,  and    a  complex  set  of  59  steps  down  the  steep  near  the  Outer  Silk  Mill.    •  The  field  is  on  top    of  a  complex  system  of  underground  streams  that  flow  down  towards  the  River  Avon.  How  do  you  know  the  anB  flooding  measures  will  really  work?  •  Why  couldn’t  you  wait  unBl  aper  the  referendum  for  the  neighbourhood  plan?  Malmesbury  St  John’s  Street  flooding,  source  BBC  LocaBon  of  Waitrose  steps    Site  level  
  • 19. “…  think  very  very  hard  about  the  long  term  good  of  the  people  of  Malmesbury.  John  Betjeman  years  ago  memorably  described  the  town  as  Œthe  Queen  of  Britain’s  hill  top  towns  .  That  is  sBll  true.  The  views  from  all  direcBons  as  you  approach  the  town  with  its  wonderful  abbey  towering  over  the  landscape-­‐  founded  in  the  Dark  Ages  inside  an  Iron  Age  hillfort,  later  made  into  a  Viking  Age  fortress  by  Alfred  the  Great-­‐  it  is  quite  simply  unique,  and  should  be  kept  that  way.”                    Michael  Wood,  Historian  

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