New Developments In Arts Marketing Slideshow

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Overview of the latest thinking in marketing and audience development for the cultural sector. Developed and delivered by Heather Maitland in association with Audiences North East.

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New Developments In Arts Marketing Slideshow

  1. 1. NEW DEVELOPMENTS IN ARTS MARKETING Heather Maitland in association with
  2. 2. <ul><li>Audiences North East (ANE) is the strategic agency for the North East of England, working across the whole cultural sector to grow, sustain and develop the region’s audiences. </li></ul><ul><li>We offer a range of research, development and promotional opportunities, all of which are tailored to meet the specific needs of the cultural sector. </li></ul><ul><li>We commissioned cultural sector consultant and author Heather Maitland to develop a 4 hour seminar aimed at disseminating the latest thinking in Marketing and audience development. </li></ul><ul><li>The seminar was delivered to a variety of arts professionals in Stockton and in Newcastle in </li></ul><ul><li>March 2009. </li></ul>
  3. 3. New Developments in marketing <ul><li>Consumer trends </li></ul><ul><li>Tips for surviving the recession </li></ul><ul><li>The future of advertising </li></ul><ul><li>New ways of looking at audiences </li></ul><ul><li>Branding trends </li></ul><ul><li>Online trends </li></ul><ul><li>2009’s most influential marketing theory </li></ul>
  4. 4. CONSUMER TRENDS
  5. 5. FACT Consumers are cutting back
  6. 7. THE LIPSTICK EFFECT
  7. 10. The rise of the FRUGALISTA
  8. 12. <ul><li>“ We did a survey with our customers at the beginning of the year. They said they are now making product choices around quality and value for money.” </li></ul>
  9. 13. But they don’t take our word for it Data firm Jupiter found that 77% of online shoppers are using reviews and ratings when making their purchasing decisions
  10. 14. The death of bling
  11. 15. COCOONING
  12. 17. AUTHENTIC HUMAN CONTACT
  13. 19. VIRTUAL ESCAPES
  14. 20. Consumer trends <ul><li>Less conspicuous consumption </li></ul><ul><li>Reduced spend on big items </li></ul><ul><li>The rise of small self-treating instead </li></ul><ul><li>Researching expenditure </li></ul><ul><li>Value for money </li></ul><ul><li>Retreat into the home </li></ul><ul><li>Less experimentation </li></ul><ul><li>Escapism </li></ul>
  15. 21. So what?
  16. 22. SURVIVING THE RECESSION
  17. 23. Innovate 72% of marketing executives said the resources they put into innovation will be sustained or increased in 2009
  18. 24. Insight 39% of marketing executives say that their spend on market research will increase
  19. 25. Do what works The trend gurus all say that return on investment will become all important – so you need to know what works
  20. 26. Keep existing customers More resources will be focused on building relationships with customers and on making the most of customer data
  21. 27. Customer satisfaction Keeping customers depends on how happy they are – marketers will be striving for better dialogue with them to resolve problems quicker
  22. 28. THE FUTURE
  23. 29. THE FUTURE OF ADVERTISING
  24. 34. Engaging and empowering the people Asking for $25 contributions The total? $500 million Using the internet to register new voters Enlisting supporters to create their own campaigns on social networking sites: the YouTube election “ At homes”
  25. 35. So what?
  26. 36. GENERATION G
  27. 37. (THAT’S G FOR GENEROSITY)
  28. 38. Cynical consumers 13% of Americans say they trust big business ¾ of Americans feel that companies don’t tell the truth in advertising
  29. 39. Wall Street sign
  30. 40. Need for Generosity Challenging times see people craving care, empathy, sympathy and generosity
  31. 42. Generosity as status symbol The lasting trend is for passionate, empowered individuals more willing and able to give, share, collaborate
  32. 44. 33 million flickr users 16 million Wikipedia pages 13 hours of video uploaded to You Tube every minute 20 million hotel reviews on Trip Advisor
  33. 45. Values not social responsibility projects
  34. 46. Strategies to target Generation G Show you care …
  35. 47. Co-donation
  36. 48. Free love
  37. 50. Make their lives easier Give your customers fun or useful services using widgets and apps
  38. 52. Random acts of kindness Send your best customers surprise gifts. Send thank you letters (that don’t try and sell them anything).
  39. 54. Help them out, be flexible
  40. 55. So, be nice to your customers….. They’ll be extra-appreciative in these troubled times They won’t forget They’ll tell other people about you They’ll be more willing to collaborate And working for a company with a caring, generous mindset can actually be good for your soul, too :-)
  41. 56. So what?
  42. 57. THE YOUTH MARKET
  43. 76. Summary <ul><li>It’s a dialogue </li></ul><ul><li>Show you care </li></ul><ul><li>Build a fan base </li></ul><ul><li>Relevance not price </li></ul><ul><li>Relevance is about social currency </li></ul><ul><li>Your whole organisation needs to have the right mindset </li></ul>
  44. 77. So what?
  45. 78. BRANDING TRENDS
  46. 79. BACK TO BASICS FOCUS DISTINCTIVENESS
  47. 82. FACT Our brains act as filters to protect us from too much information
  48. 83. <ul><li>&quot;In the West we maybe see, at a conservative estimate, 500 advertising messages every day. We see as many advertising messages in a year as our parents saw in their entire lives.” </li></ul><ul><li>Tim Phillips, Technology Journalist </li></ul><ul><li>http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/programmes/click_online/5285058.stm </li></ul>
  49. 90. THREE MORE TRENDS ROBERT JONES HEAD OF NEW THINKING WOLFF OLINS
  50. 91. Post-Consumer Activist Brands will become platforms on which people can do things
  51. 93. BUT
  52. 96. Brand as multiplier Umbrella brands that grow the impact exponentially
  53. 98. Post-Western Plurality Brands will become a theme with variations rather than the duplication of a formula
  54. 99. “ Identity not identical”
  55. 100. So what?
  56. 101. AUDIENCE DEVELOPMENT IS DEAD
  57. 102. … .LONG LIVE PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT
  58. 103. Audience development <ul><li>‘ The term audience development describes activity which is undertaken specifically to meet the needs of existing and potential audiences and to help arts organisations to develop on-going relationships with audiences. It can include aspects of marketing, commissioning, programming, education, customer care and distribution.’ </li></ul><ul><li>[1] Information: Grants for the Arts - audience development and marketing, Arts Council England, consulted at www.artscouncil.org.uk/documents/information/audiencedevgfta_phpx05G6i.doc accessed 30th June 2008 </li></ul>
  59. 104. The McMaster Report <ul><li>Tessa Jowell, the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport asked Brian McMaster to consider, among other things, ‘how artistic excellence can encourage wider and deeper engagement with the arts by audiences’ </li></ul><ul><li>Supporting Excellence in the Arts: from measurement to judgement, Sir Brian McMaster, DCMS, January 2008, p 6 </li></ul>
  60. 105. What is public engagement <ul><li>‘ Public engagement’ has a political dimension centred on public value. It is based on a belief that for public subsidy to be legitimate, the organisations that get funded must have the trust and support of the public. Public engagement is a process. It’s the way that public managers can help citizens identify and express their collective preferences. It is, in effect, a tool for bringing public services and citizens closer together, for redressing the ‘democratic deficit’. </li></ul><ul><li>Deliberative Democracy and the Role of Public Managers, L Horner, R Lekhi and R Blaug, The Work Foundation, November 2006. </li></ul>
  61. 106. What’s the difference <ul><li>Public engagement is about trust through accountability </li></ul><ul><li>In theory, effective audience development is a two-way exchange requiring the building of trust </li></ul><ul><li>In practice, most arts organisations don’t see themselves as accountable to their audiences </li></ul><ul><li>Many arts organisations see themselves as artistically led </li></ul><ul><li>Public engagement responds to the public’s collective preferences </li></ul><ul><li>Public engagement i about the importance of democracy in the delivery of effective public services. </li></ul><ul><li>Audience development describes a set of activities to increase and broaden audiences for the creative work. </li></ul>
  62. 107. Excellence and engagement <ul><li>Excellence in culture happens ‘when an experience affects and changes an individual.’ </li></ul><ul><li>‘ for something to be excellent it has to be relevant, and for it to be relevant it has to be continually reinterpreted and refined for and by its audience’ </li></ul><ul><li>‘ nothing can be excellent without reflecting the society which produces and experiences it’ </li></ul><ul><li>‘ Excellence is about experience and good practice is what leads to it’ </li></ul><ul><li>Supporting Excellence in the Arts: from measurement to judgement, Sir Brian McMaster, DCMS, January 2008, pp 9-10 </li></ul>
  63. 111. Excellence is about experience So we need to understand the experience…
  64. 112. MARKET RESEARCH TRENDS
  65. 114. Don’t ask questions Observe and listen
  66. 115. So what?
  67. 116. ONLINE TRENDS
  68. 117. ONLINE DIALOGUE
  69. 119. Who’s online? Ofcom report 2008 65% of homes have internet access 58% of households have access to broadband 59% in rural areas
  70. 120. Social networking Twice as many marketers as last year say they are sick of hearing about social networking
  71. 122. E-STRATEGY
  72. 123. Offline and online integration Use offline media to drive people to the web
  73. 125. Do what works Was it worth the time, energy and money?
  74. 127. Do what works Work to increase conversion rates so A/B testing is crucial
  75. 128. Better targeting What are the customer behaviours that lead to ticket sales
  76. 131. Better leverage of online communities It’s good to talk but it’s much better if they do something
  77. 134. User saturation Users are making choices – find out which ones
  78. 136. ONLINE COMMUNICATIONS
  79. 137. Anticipated, relevant, timely Better targeted, more pertinent messages…
  80. 138. <ul><li>… over a variety of devices </li></ul>
  81. 139. Non-intrusive communications Providing information when and where people need it
  82. 140. Events led communications Customer behaviour should trigger a communication so we need our databases to integrate with sales functions
  83. 141. WEBSITES
  84. 142. Two way communication so… … can visitors to your website communicate easily with you?
  85. 144. Social content not just sales Co-creation through comments, reviews and ratings
  86. 146. More attractive content, not just sales talk Business blogs are now standard (because they support SEO and customer engagement)
  87. 147. Lightweight websites … … that work on netbooks and smartphones
  88. 151. SEARCH ENGINES
  89. 152. Search engine optimisation matters They are still the first place online users look for information
  90. 154. www.ranks.nl
  91. 155. Google really matters 74% of UK searches are through Google
  92. 157. BUT Some people don’t like Google and are searching via blogs and co-created sites like Trip Advisor
  93. 158. SO 14% trust advertising but 78% trust recommendations so user generated content is King
  94. 159. Use of local searches growing cinema stockton theatres in newcastle
  95. 161. More smartphones means… … even more localised searches using mobile applications
  96. 162. So what?
  97. 163. MOST INFLUENTIAL MARKETING CONCEPT 2009
  98. 164. Influencers A small number of people can influence the mass market
  99. 165. The bottom line? More than £500m is spent each year on targeting influentials. This is growing at 36% a year
  100. 166. But this is old news to the arts Alan Brown wrote about Initiators and Responders: a new way to view orchestra audiences in 2004
  101. 167. Initiators People who enjoy creating cultural experiences for friends and family
  102. 168. Responders The potential attenders of your event sitting at home waiting for a friend to phone or email with an invitation
  103. 169. www.wolfbrown.com
  104. 170. Sometimes NEW DEVELOPMENTS IN MARKETING start with the arts!
  105. 171. Credits <ul><li>TRENDS </li></ul><ul><li>Top Marketing Trends for 2009: </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.marketingcharts.com/interactive/top-marketing-trends-for-2009-execs-sick-of-web-20-7448/ </li></ul><ul><li>Key trends in 2009: http://www.marketingimprovement.com/key-trends-in-2009 </li></ul><ul><li>Daphne Kasriel, Top 10 Consumer Trends for 2009 : http://www.euromonitor.com/TOP_10_CONSUMER_TRENDS_FOR_2009 </li></ul><ul><li>UK Film Council: A Short Note on UK Cinema Admissions During Recessions: </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.ukfilmcouncil.org.uk/media/pdf/n/t/A_short_note_on_UK_cinema_admissions_during_recessions.pdf </li></ul><ul><li>AUDIENCES </li></ul><ul><li>Generation G : </li></ul><ul><li>http://trendwatching.com/briefing/ </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.cultureoffuture.com/ </li></ul><ul><li>Graham Brown, mobileYouth.org, 50 Youth Marketing Trends for 2009 </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.slideshare.net/mobileyouth/part-1-50-youth-marketing-trends-for-2009-by-graham-brown-mobileyouthorg-presentation </li></ul><ul><li>BRANDING </li></ul><ul><li>Marty Neumeier, Neutron LLC, The Brand Gap </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.slideshare.net/coolstuff/the-brand-gap </li></ul>
  106. 172. Credits <ul><li>ONLINE TRENDS </li></ul><ul><li>Heidi Cohen, Seven Top Online Marketing Trends for 2009 : http://www.clickz.com/3632306 </li></ul><ul><li>30 Web Trends for 2009 : http://www.seoptimise.com/blog/2008/12/30-web-trends-for-2009.html </li></ul><ul><li>Strange Corporation, Online Marketing Trends for 2009 http://www.strangecorp.com/news/view/online-marketing-trends-in-2009 </li></ul><ul><li>SEARCH ENGINE DATA </li></ul><ul><li>Hitwise </li></ul><ul><li>http://weblogs.hitwise.com/robin-goad/2008/03/local_search_in_the_uk.html http://weblogs.hitwise.com/to-go-uk/2009/02/searches_for_valentine_breaks.html http://weblogs.hitwise.com/robin-goad/2009/01/searches_for_flights_down_eurozone_usa_turkey.html </li></ul><ul><li>INFLUENCERS </li></ul><ul><li>Duncan Brown and Nick Hayes, Influencer Marketing (2008) </li></ul><ul><li>Ruth Mortimer, ‘Marketing Theory: Treasure Seekers’ , Brand Strategy , 9/6/08 </li></ul><ul><li>http://goliath.ecnext.com/coms2/gi_0199-7953006/MARKETING-THEORY-Treasure-seekers.html </li></ul><ul><li>Alan Brown, Initiators and Responders : a new way to view orchestra audiences </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.wolfbrown.com/index.php?mact=News,cntnt01,detail,0&cntnt01articleid=37&cntnt01origid=414&cntnt01detailtemplate=articles_detail&cntnt01returnid=417 </li></ul>

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