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ENTITLE - Libraries Lifelong Learning

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Presentation given by Rob Davies outlining the ENTITLE Libraries for Lifelong Learning project at the Kick-off Meeting. London, 5/6 February 2008

Presentation given by Rob Davies outlining the ENTITLE Libraries for Lifelong Learning project at the Kick-off Meeting. London, 5/6 February 2008

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  • This table illustrates the self-assessed results of monitoring the 10 point action plan from theOeiras Manifesto (PULMAN) – see the CALIMERA website. It shows that the national starting points across Europe are very different.

Transcript

  • 1. ENTITLE kick off: introduction Rob Davies, MDR London 5/6 February 2008
  • 2. Libraries and lifelong learning: a brief overview of EU initiatives and projects
  • 3. Political and strategic initiatives - i-2010
    • One of major pillars calls for "inclusion, better services for citizens and quality of life"
    • Emphasises enhanced use of ICT for life-long learning and social inclusion
    • Improve quality and effectiveness of EU education and training systems
    • Ensure they are accessible to all
    • Open up education and training to the wider world
      • especially those who, due to their geographical location, socio-economic situation or special needs, do not have easy access to traditional education and training.
  • 4. Some EU communications and reports (there are more…)
    • 2001 EC Communication Making a European Area of Lifelong Learning a Reality
      • traditional systems must be transformed to become more open and flexible
      • learners to have individual learning pathways, suitable to needs/interests
      • take advantage of opportunities throughout their lives
    • 2006 - Joint Interim Report on progress under the "Education and Training 2010" work programme
      • all citizens need to acquire and update their skills throughout life
      • special attention to specific needs of those at risk of social exclusion
      • adult learning ( quantity and quality) is also important for the competence development of medium and high-skilled people
  • 5. 2006 EU Communication Adult Education: it's never too late to learn
    • Countries to promote adult learning in Europe and place it firmly on the political agenda
    • Personal benefits of development and fulfillment
    • Raise skill levels
    • Reduce social exclusion
    • Promote active citizenship
    • Support employability and mobility in the labour market
    • Major challenge: lifting the barriers to participation for all groups, especially the ageing population and migrants
    • European Qualifications Framework (EQF)
  • 6. Action Plan (2007) It’s always a good time to learn – key messages http://ec.europa.eu/education/policies/adult/com558_en.pdf
    • Implement the 5 key messages in the Communication to remove barriers to participation
      • increase quality and efficiency
      • speed up the process of validation and recognition
      • ensure sufficient investment
      • monitor the sector
      • focus on those who are disadvantaged because of low literacy levels, inadequate skills for work and social integration
  • 7. Action Plan: some goals
    • Complexity of sector
    • Reduce labour shortages due to demographic changes
    • Address problem of high number of early school leavers (nearly 7 million in 2006)
      • offer a second chance
    • Increase integration of migrants in society and labour market
    • Increase participation in lifelong learning
      • decreases after the age of 34
      • adult (age 25-64) participation in lifelong learning is no longer increasing
  • 8. The Action Plan: some specific aims
    • Increase possibilities for adults to go "one step up"
      • to achieve a qualification at least one level higher than before
      • broader notion of individual ‘progression’?
    • Speed up assessment of skills and social competences
      • have them validated and recognised in terms of learning outcomes
    • Improve the monitoring of adult learning sector
    • Member States developing National Qualification Frameworks linked to the European Qualification Framework
      • how to access, progress and transfer
    • 2008 analysis of the implication of national reforms
    • 2009 results of analysis showing trends, achievements and gaps at European and national level
    • Can ENTITLE tie-in?
  • 9. Improve the quality of provision in the adult learning sector
    • Affected by policy, resources, accommodation etc
    • Key factor is the quality of staff involved in delivery
    • Little attention has been paid to the training (initial and continuing), status and payment of adult learning staff
      • crucial in motivating adult learners to participate
    • 2008 results of the study Adult learning professions in Europe to be published
      • identify existing good practice in Member States and formulate recommendations
    • 2009 Development of standards for adult learning professionals, including guidance services, based on existing good practice
    • 2010 Further research on development of quality standards and accreditation of providers
      • will contribute to the monitoring of the sector
    • Can ENTITLE tie in?
  • 10. Speed up assessing and recognizing non-/informal learning for disadvantaged groups
    • Recognition and validation of non-/informal learning
      • many Member States have a legal framework and pilot programmes
    • Assessment and recognition of skills and social competences, regardless of where and how
      • especially important for those who do not have basic qualifications
    • Positive approach to recognition of non/informal learning
      • including that brought by migrants
    • 2008 Identification of good practice in recognition/validation of non/informal learning
      • special focus on social competences, acquired outside formal learning
    • 2009 Peer learning activity at European level
      • exchange of good practice, crossborder exchanges, funded by LLP
    • 2010 First report of results presented and discussed
    • Can ENTITLE tie-in?
  • 11. Improve monitoring of the adult learning sector
    • Lack of comparable data in the sector
      • a minimum set of core data is required every 2 years
    • Strong relationship with the ongoing development and work on indicators and benchmarks
      • including work done in the Standing Group on Benchmarks and Indicators
    • 2008 Study launched by the Commission leading to proposal on consistent terminology to be agreed by Member States/ stakeholders
      • Study also to propose a set of core data
    • 2009 Collection of core data will start in the Member States who wish to participate
    • 2010 Results published in Joint Progress Report on Education and Training 2010
    • ENTITLE tie-in?
  • 12. Key funding programmes
    • LLP (Grundtvig, Comenius, Leonardo da Vinci, Erasmus, KAs)
      • KAs are ‘transversal’
      • Practice to policy
    • ESF/national structural funds
    • These 2 seen as specific to implementation of the Action Plan on Adult Learning
    • IST research programme (cultural heritage applications and technology-enhanced learning)
    • eContentplus
    • EQUAL
    • Interreg
    • National funding programmes
  • 13. Informal learning, technology etc
    • Learning not confined to formal institutions such as schools, colleges and universities
    • Learning occurs increasingly through leisure activities that are mediated by digital technologies
      • part of people's social and cultural lives
      • playing of computer games; use of chat rooms; mobile devices; exploitation of digital media (cameras); digital television etc
    • Young people are immersed in ICT-related activities in their homes and with their friends
      • Young people are getting older…and anyway old people do it too
    • Concept of a wide ‘ecology’ of learning
      • education institutions, homes, families and friends, the workplace, talking to people, leisure activities etc
      • interaction with libraries and other community and cultural organisations all play a role
  • 14. Public libraries and the learning agenda
    • Public libraries in Europe are used by lots of people
      • (180 million ‘members’)
    • Increasingly able to extend multiple learning experiences to visitors
      • from all age groups and sections of society
    • Many calls for greater collaboration between libraries, schools/adult education sector
      • most often takes place at local level, even where a broad national policy framework exists.
    • Interest in informal learning is a more mainstream political concern
      • not assigned sufficient resources or co-ordinated to maximise impact
    • Lots of projects, programmes to develop/promote the role of libraries
      • digital literacy, ICT skills development, provision of digital content e-Learning
      • How big is the impact?
    • Public libraries must offer new and innovative services and activities
  • 15. Some ‘important’ projects to date
    • IST Research Programmes FP4-6 (1998-2005)
      • PubliCA, PULMAN and CALIMERA
      • Oeiras Manifesto compiled under PULMAN, monitored under CALIMERA - disparities
      • Guidelines on public library services (including learning) translated into 30 languages
    • Projects under LLP and predecessors (Grundtvig etc)
      • DILLMULI (public libraries and museums)
      • PULLS
      • Games in libraries (AITMES, Mapps.com)
      • There are more….
    • EQUAL
      • LearnEast
      • ABSIDE
  • 16. CALIMERA http://www.calimera.org
  • 17. Oeiras Manifesto (2003): 4 strands
    • Democracy and citizenship
    • Economic and social development
    • Cultural diversity
    • Lifelong Learning
    • Focus on the needs of children, and those who care for them, by providing a fun, safe and stimulating environment for school work and leisure, incorporating games and new technologies and by creating partnerships with schools and other educational bodies
    • Develop their role as centres for de-institutionalised and informal learning, offering content, training and support to citizens at all stages of their lives, taking full advantage of the potential of e-learning
    • Contribute to the development of a functionally literate information society by continuing to promote reading, using all means, including the World Wide Web
  • 18.  
  • 19. DILLMULI toolkit http://www.dillmuli.feek.pte.hu/tk1.pdf
    • Toolkit
      • intended to assist practitioners and policy makers to identify guidance and best practice across a wide range of aspects concerning the role of museums and libraries in adult education
      • structured according to six main content categories
        • Policies
        • Applied learning: theory and practice
        • Good practice, barriers and problems
        • Staffing
        • Funding programmes
        • Dissemination and advocacy
    • Exhibition
      • included e.g. Inspiring Learning for All and PULMAN
  • 20.  
  • 21. Position of international library associations
    • IFLA
      • The Role of Libraries in Lifelong Learning Final report of the project under the Section for Public Libraries, 2004 http://www.ifla.org/VII/s8/proj/Lifelong-LearningReport.pdf
      • Recommendations on library and educational policy, co-operation, need for change in public libraries (working methods, new professional profiles)
    • EBLIDA
      • Statement to the EC Memorandum on Lifelong Learning (June 2001) Role of libraries in lifelong learning
        • libraries have fundamental role to play in development of strategies
        • disappointed that libraries mentioned just once along with shopping malls and bus stations
        • overlooks key function of libraries: active partner offering access, professional guidance and training to global resources in local setting
        • Children actively encouraged to use and evaluate information independently
    • LLL one of 5 stated current priorities for EBLIDA
  • 22. Position of European education associations
    • European Schoolnet
    • European Association for Adult Education (EAEA)
  • 23. ENTITLE: objectives and workplan
  • 24. What is ENTITLE doing - broadly speaking?
    • Multilateral project under LLP KA4 Dissemination and Exploitation of Results
      • ‘ valorisation’ = getting the most out of things
    • Support and extend progress made to date by Europe’s public libraries in supporting learning
      • for all age groups and sections of society
      • ‘ transversal’ i.e. across education ‘sectors’: school, higher, vocational
    • Disseminating, consolidating, enhancing the work of key existing networks, projects and initiatives
    • Trying to develop ways to measure the impact of learning through (public) libraries
    • Focus on the contribution to be made through informal learning settings (libraries) to lifelong learning ,
      • combating digital illiteracy and social exclusion
      • special attention to role of ICT
  • 25. Underlying assumptions
    • Informal learning organisations e.g. libraries have a vital job to do
      • supporting individual learners’ needs
      • providing them with choices and flexibility
      • helping people to continue and return to learning
      • enabling adults to get a job, qualification or skill
      • signposting and inspiring people to take up other courses
      • helping children to learn
      • supporting schools in diversifying children’s experiences
    • Specific case for investment needs to be better and more measurably demonstrated to policy makers and funders
    • Deployment and mainstreaming of innovative activities and services remains inconsistent across EU countries
      • effective co-ordination lacking in some countries
  • 26. ENTITLE: 2 main objectives
    • Identify, describe and disseminate good practice
      • specific services, tools and approaches used for learning in public library settings
      • build on work conducted under different programmes
      • support multiplication and mainstreaming
      • enable fuller understanding of contribution to learning agendas, maximise consensus
      • recommendations to Member States/EU for supporting and extending contribution to lifelong learning policies and actions
    • Provide an evidence-based framework for comparison and exploitation of results within and between countries
      • impact on learners
      • potential for future use in comparative research studies
  • 27. ‘Significant and continuing effect’
    • Development and assessment of new learning services provided by public libraries
    • Development of fruitful relationships with learning partner organisations
    • ‘ Ripple-effect’ at both policy and practitioner level.
    • Benefit for end users
      • among schools, adult learners and vocationally-oriented learners
      • access and experience of informal/non-formal learning
      • + more seeking access to informal opportunities
    • Sustain a Europe-wide community of practice
      • post-project arrangements for collaborative web environment, at least two years after project
  • 28. Measuring our success: quantitative indicators
    • Public library services of 12 member states
      • account for about 30% of Europe’s estimated 96,000 public libraries
      • about 50,000 staff.
      • 180 million citizens of the EU currently use public libraries
    • Assumption: about 15% of staff have an explicit responsibility for provision of learning services
    • By end of the process initiated by the project about 40% (3000) of these will be aware of the project’s results.
    • Impact assessment framework will be understood by smaller number of more specialist staff
      • management and decision-maker level
      • estimated at about 50% (1500) of the above.
    • Extension of project results to other Member States through web and final conference (policy makers)
  • 29. Can we define and measure learning outcomes?
    • How do how public library services contribute to valid learning outcomes (knowledge, personal development, skills, inclusion etc)
      • Supporting basic skills and competences (reading, numeracy, ICT)
      • Language learning
      • Digital Literacy, creativity and content creation;
      • Strengthening progression to other phases of learning and employment
      • Complementing and enriching formal learning (vocational and business education, homework, course, research and project support, out of school, holiday activities)
  • 30. Libraries need to act
    • Public libraries have natural advantages including
      • strong roots in local communities
      • tradition of partnership with schools and learning-oriented services of various kinds for children
      • increasingly established role as part of Lifelong Learning ‘landscape’
    • Embed more thoroughly into their policies a learning culture
    • Find ways of measuring/demonstrating their impact on people’s learning
    • Spread awareness of results of successful initiatives across Europe
    • Convince education and cultural policy makers that they have a key role in learning delivery
    • Work out where their major value lies in new learning agendas
  • 31. Outcomes for libraries
    • Build a learning culture which enables and empowers libraries to:
      • provide effective learning opportunities
      • consult and form partnerships with other stakeholders
      • create a learning environment (spaces, equipment, staff support for learners)
      • respond to political initiatives and gain funding
      • promote the organisation as a place to learn
      • evaluate the impact of services on learners and learning
  • 32. ENTITLE: expected results
    • Guidelines and recommendations
    • Establish a web-based dissemination environment
      • Including case studies
    • Promotion innovation and consult via a series of national meetings
    • Establish an impact assessment framework
      • specific contributions of libraries to learning
      • provide a basis for future comparison, experience sharing and assessment of progress
    • Valorise and endorse through Final Conference for policy makers
  • 33. Who are we aiming at
    • Policy makers, associations and networks in the cultural and educational sectors
      • • regional, national, and European level
      • • municipality and regional learning departments and decision-makers
      • • library managers and practitioners in the provision of learning services
      • • teachers/practitioners in the school, vocational and adult contexts and frameworks
  • 34. This meeting: Day 1
    • Libraries and lifelong learning: a brief overview of EU initiatives and projects (Rob Davies)
    • Overview of project objectives and workplan (Rob Davies, MDR)
    • Public libraries, innovation, ICT and adult learning (Anne-Marie
    • Schmidt, Aarhus)
    • Children, schools, libraries and learning (Roger Blamire, European SchoolNet)
    • How can we assess the impact of lifelong learning through libraries: learning from experience (John Dolan, MLA)
    • Progression and accreditation through informal learning: from what to what? (Peter Wilson, NIACE)
    • The ENTITLE website: what does it need to do? (Luc Chase, MDR)
  • 35. Day 2
    • Key developments in participating countries (tour de table - 10 mins
    • each max)
    • Discussion: what are the main similarities and differences between
    • national approaches? Can we achieve a comparative framework?
    • Project responsibilities, management and finance: how it will
    • work and next steps (Rob Davies, MDR)
  • 36. The ENTITLE consortium
    • 12 country focus
      • Austria, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, Greece, Hungary, Malta, Portugal, Romania, Slovenia and UK
      • BUT results to be applicable and usable in all countries of Europe.
    • Complementary competences
      • 1 European network – European Schoolnet (+Eblida?)
      • 2 national agencies – MLA (UK) and NUK (Slovenia) - with strategic responsibiity
      • 5 major municipal public library services – Aarhus (Denmark), Cluj (Romania), Helsinki (Finland), Lisbon (Portugal), Veria (Greece)
      • 3 national professional library associations – BVOE (Austria), ULISO (Bulgaria) and Publika (Hungary)
      • 3 NGO/SMEs – CrossCzech (Czech Republic), AcrossLimits (Malta) and Malta (UK) with EC implementation track records and strong ministerial contacts
  • 37. WP 1 kick-off meeting and briefing (leader – MDR)
    • Brief participants on project concepts, workplan, financial and reporting provisions etc
    • Gather preliminary information on policy backgrounds, trends, initiatives
    • Present innovative and stimulating approaches
    • Assess the state of the art in impact assessment in each country
    • D1 Report of kick of meeting (WP1)
    • A report on the initial country-by-country findings on the state of the art and an action plan for the project
  • 38. WP 2 Review of existing results, initiatives and progress (leader – Cross Czech)
    • Structured survey, designed and co-ordinated by MDR
    • Completed for all participating countries
      • identify and document the policy background
      • good practice instances
      • dissemination and exploitation activities
      • Results of available data collection and evaluation activities
        • national and regional/local level
      • impact assessment activities and frameworks
    • Results consolidated and gaps identified
      • presented on web site
      • enable future moderated contributions (WIKI?)
      • baseline for gap analysis and future work
    • D2 Baseline survey results
      • A systematic structured baseline document with data on which to base development of the remaining project work and outputs
  • 39. WP 3 Impact assessment framework design and testing (leader - MLA )
    • Design a framework for impact assessment
      • build on work to date
      • range of quantitative and qualitative instruments
      • MLA working with MDR and EUN
    • Online document for test completion by 3 countries
      • both institutional and national or regional level data completion
      • 4 month testing period
    • Multi-stakeholder meeting in Slovenia (M10)
      • experts review framework in light of preliminary results
    • Revise and extend framework to all participant countries
    • Review and produce final framework
      • conclusions and gaps in data availability highlighted
      • basis for full scale use in future comparative studies
    • D3 Finalised impact assessment framework
    • A portfolio document providing validated and tested instruments for conducting impact assessment and analysing the data collected
  • 40. WP 4 Guidelines and recommendations (leader - Aarhus)
    • Series of concise guidelines on e.g. effective policy provisions, learning management, use of ICT
      • draw on results of WP2
      • Define coverage of guidelines
      • link to good practice in service provision (e.g. CALIMERA)
      • working group of 5 partners, editing by EUN and MDR
      • dissemination and contributive comment on Web
      • integrate with impact assessment work
    • Draft recommendations for policy makers and professionals
      • in public libraries and wider related learning communities
    • Assess and review at multi-stakeholder workshop in Slovenia (M10)
      • modify as agreed
      • translate into national languages (nb limited funding)
    • D4 Guidelines with draft recommendations
    • A structured and navigable web tool for online browsing
  • 41. Possible areas for guidelines - l earning management
    • Staff competences and workforce development
    • Funding for the development of learning services;
    • Improving diversity of provision: types of learning services
    • Partnerships with schools, adult learning providers and employers
    • Increasing learner participation
      • re-engaging adult learners, including marginal groups, family and inter-generational learning)
    • Learner support methods
    • Accreditation: availability and demand for learning certification
      • including services currently provided, such as ECDL)
    • Development of an organisational learning and evaluation culture and practices
  • 42. Possible areas for guidelines - ICT
    • Creation of networked eLearning environments
    • Personalisation of learning
    • New tools (mobile learning, interactive TV, Web 2.0, computer games-based learning etc)
    • Designing inspiring, safe and accessible learning spaces and virtual environments
    • ALSO Guidelines on Learning Outcomes
  • 43. WP 5 Twelve National Meetings (leader - Veria)
    • Audience
      • policy makers, senior practitioners and partners from other learning sectors to disseminate
    • Discuss and promote adoption of emerging ENTITLE results
      • guidelines, recommendations and impact assessment framework
    • 60-150 people
    • Held in national languages
    • Common core agenda
      • flexibility to incorporate national perspectives and agendas
      • outcomes incorporated in guidelines, recommendations, impact assessment
    • WP 5 Reports from 12 national meetings
    • Compiled as a section within the ENTITLE web environment , structured according to template format for purposes of comparability in national languages with translated versions in English
  • 44. WP6 Web environment (leader - MDR)
    • Basic site available by Month 3, ongoing development
      • Established and maintained by MDR
    • Based on a leading OS Content Management System
      • Integrate moderated contributor access (wiki format?)
    • All content and results disseminated through website
      • guidelines, recommendations and impact assessment framework
      • stakeholder database for distribution
      • RSS newsfeeds
      • newsletter
      • lightweight registration (to receive notifications)
    • Session later to discuss site sections and functionality
      • Cost limitations !
    • D6 ENTITLE web environment (WP6)
      • An attractive and user friendly interface to project outputs, a news dissemination facility and a means of developing and involving a sustainable community of practice
  • 45. WP7 Final Conference and Report (leader - Publika)
    • Hosted in Hungary (by Publika)
    • Target: up to 150 policy makers and representatives of national and European associations in the learning sector
      • special focus on countries not directly represented in ENTITLE
      • additional, wider opportunity to validate, disseminate and promote exploitation of ENTITLE results
      • high-level political keynote speaker
      • issue a ‘Declaration’
      • Conference organisation committee
    • ENTITLE Final Report in English
      • editorial support of MDR
    • D7 Final Report and Conference Proceedings
    • A composite report on the ENTITLE’s work, including the proceedings and resolutions of the Final Conference, available via the web environment and also in print format ,in English. Summary translations will be produced in participants’ national languages and encouraged in all major EU languages
  • 46. WP8 Project Management (leader - MDR)
    • Project co-ordination, management and web dissemination infrastructure
      • communication and reporting to the Commission
      • day to day communications between partners
      • effective management of the project’s finances
      • assuring quality of project outputs (peer review, through wiki?)
    • Project decisions will be taken by PMB
      • 6 partners (secretariat support provided by MDR)
      • Meets 5 times (combined with other events)
    • Quality of project outputs
      • Peer review e.g. through wiki
    • WP leaders have high level of responsibility for results
  • 47. Workplan overview PM PM PM PM PM WP8 Project Management FC WP7 Final conference and report WP6 Web environment NM NM NM NM NM NM NM WP5 National meetings MS WP4 Guidelines and recommendations MS WP3 Impact assessment framework design and testing WP2 Review of existing results, initiatives and progress KO WP1 kick-off meeting and briefing M24 M23 M22 M21 M20 M19 M18 M17 M16 M15 M14 M13 M12 M11 M10 M9 M8 M7 M6 M5 M4 M3 M2 M1
  • 48. Summary of meetings
    • Kick-off meeting (UK) Feb 08 2 days
    • Multi-stakeholder workshop (Slovenia) Oct 08 2 days
    • 12 National Meetings Apr-Oct 09 1 day
    • Final Conference Nov 09 1.5 days
    • Four more Project Management Board meetings
      • M6 (June 08)
      • M10 (October 08, Slovenia)
      • M17 (May 09)
      • M22 (Oct 09, Hungary)
  • 49. Funding overview (EUR)
    • Total costs 313,744
    • Staff costs 218,229 (74.4%)
    • Travel and subsistence 43,990 (15%)
    • Equipment 2,500 (0.85%)
    • Subcontracting
    • Other 28,500 (9.72%)
    • Indirect costs (o’head) 20,525 (7%)
    • LLP contribution (74.8%) 234,680
  • 50. The budget ‘cut’
    • From 399,276 in proposal to 313,744 in grant agreement
    • 30% of staff costs across all categories
      • Days now reallocated in line with costs
    • Travel costs reduced from 27% to 15% of total
  • 51. Project responsibilities, management and finance: how it will work and next steps (Rob Davies, MDR)
  • 52. Contract
    • Agency implements LLP and other education/culture programmes on behalf of Commission
    • Commission does strategy, programme development, high level monitoring
    • MDR contract with the Agency circulated
    • See Annex III (URL) for the latest on admin, financial management
    • and reporting
    • ttp://eacea.ec.europa.eu/static/en/llp/reporting/
  • 53. LLP project lifecycle
    • Signature of Agreement
    • First pre-financing payment
    • Progress Report and 2 nd pre-financing payment
    • Final report and balance payment/recovery
    • Amendments
    • Possible audit within 5 years: keep all docs
  • 54. Management roles
    • MDR co-ordinator
    • WP leaders – QA and progress on their
      • MDR
      • Cross Czech
      • MLA
      • Aarhus
      • Veria
      • MDR
      • Publika
      • MDR
  • 55. Partner involvement
    • WP 1 – all partners
    • WP 2 – all partners
    • WP 3 (expanded) – MLA, MDR, Across Limits, BVOE, Cluj, NUK, ULISO, Veria, EUN
      • NUK will host multi-stakeholder workshop
    • WP 4 (expanded) – all partners
    • WP5 – all partners (except EUN)
    • WP6 – MDR
    • WP7 – Publika, MDR, Cross Czech, EUN (Helsinki, Lisbon)
    • WP8 – PMB (proposed): MDR, Aarhus, Helsinki, NUK, Lisbon, Veria, EUN
  • 56. Funding overview (EUR)
    • Total costs 313,744
    • Staff costs 218,229 (74.4%)
    • Travel and subsistence 43,990 (15%)
    • Equipment 2,500 (0.85%)
    • Subcontracting
    • Other 28,500 (9.72%)
    • Indirect costs (o’head) 20,525 (7%)
    • LLP contribution (74.8%) 234,680
  • 57. ‘ Other’ Costs (EUR)
    • Venue & catering for national meetings 750 X 12 = 9000
    • Venue & catering for final conference = 6000
    • Printing and publishing of publicity, final report = 2500
    • Translation costs ex English (avg 1K per partner) = 12000
  • 58. The budget ‘cut’
    • From 399,276 in proposal to 313,744 in grant agreement
    • 30% of staff costs across all categories
      • Days now reallocated in line with costs
    • Travel costs reduced from 27% to 15% of total
  • 59. Cost claim and payment procedures
    • First advance (40% minus partner share of costs of kick off meeting)
    • Cost claim after 12 months followed by second advance (project receives 40%)
      • 70% of original advance must be spent
    • Last 20% after final report
    • Cost reporting is in summary form
    • Timesheets needed
    • MDR will send you forms when EACEA produces them
  • 60. Claiming costs
    • Claim actual expenditure but within budget
    • Note ceilings
      • personnel rates per country (EACEA has request in to derogate rtes for Bulgaria, Romania maybe others to higher 2008 rates)
      • per staff category
      • Travel and subsistence rates per city (actuals or per diems are ok)
  • 61. Some rules
    • In effect there are no fixed total partner budgets!
      • management of overall budget is co-ordinator responsibility
      • regard partner personnel budgets as a fixed ceiling (n.b. days have been recalculated to match budget)
      • travel, accommodation, ‘other costs’ depend on actual expenditure on that activity across all partners – within ceilings
      • contract between partners and MDR voluntary
        • EACEA is going to provide a template
  • 62. Eligible costs
    • Reasonable, justified and necessary
    • Directly connected with the project
    • Generated during project lifetime
    • Actually incurred and duly recorded in accounts, identifiable and verifiable
    • Staff costs to be reported on a real basis
    • Indirect costs, flat rate fixed at 7%
    • Subcontracting no more than 30%
    • Equipment depreciation governed by national rules
    • Profit not allowed: all sources of income to be declared
    • Money remains property of Commission until final payment
    • Interest generated must be reported
    • EC contribution may be reduced if someone else pays over 25%
  • 63. Supporting documentation
    • Timesheets for staff costs (salary plus social charges)
    • Same documents as those required by national accounting rules
    • Currency: apply infoeuro rate on 1 st day of eligibility period http://ec.europa.eu/busget/infoeuro/
  • 64. Changes
    • Must be requested before they take effect
      • Not close to end of project
    • Should never substantially modify the project
    • Depending on type of change – amendment signed by both parties (MDR and Agency) or simple exchange of letter
    • Appropriate forms published on Agency website
    • Budget transfers between cost categories up to 10% of recipient category
    • Accepted only if justified and a consequence of change in workprogramme
    • Within cost categories up to consortium/co-ordinator
  • 65. Next steps
    • WP 1 MDR reports on kick off meeting (27 Feb): leave or send your slides
    • WP 6 Website launched (20 March)
    • WP 2 MDR circulates survey (21 March)
    • WP 3 Impact working group begins work (21 March); three countries for initial testing identified
    • FIX DATES FOR OCTOBER MEETING
    • More detailed timetable